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Your bushcraft/woods play suggestions

Discussion in 'EDC Bags' started by Chester, Jan 8, 2015.

  1. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    Hey guys, so I have been trying to come up with a good all around kit for a simple woods, bushcraft kit.

    The bag I have right now and want to use is the Maxpedition Jumbo Versipack/foliage green.

    I want two divide my kit into three parts:
    Shelter roll (poncho or tarp, liner or wool blanket, spare paracord etc.)
    Main Kit Bag (5 cs, spare shelter setup, spare knives and tools, etc.)
    Essentials bag (not sure how to incorporate this one, but a small sling pouch with the essentials and stuff for just going out into the woods to mess around)

    So anyways, here are the actual questions:
    1. What would you choose for a bedroll, shelter roll? Just for ideas mainly.
    2. What is in your main woods kit? What would you use for a small cooking setup?
    3. What would you put in your essentials pouch? And also, can you take a look at the cabelas camo possibles pouch and tell me what you think?

    Anyways, thanks guys for reading my post and for any suggestions or answers to my questions.

    Chester out
     
  2. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    Also my choice of the 5 cs:
    Cutting: ESEE CM6, plus smaller spare knife, winchester small skinning knife. Leatherman charge Tti for MT.

    Combustion: Sweedish soldier model fire steel, and bic lighters and stormproof matches. Plus fire kit of course.

    Container: klean kanteen 40 oz.

    Cordage: Paracord of assorted sizes, for ridgelines, clothlines, random tying tasks, belaying food items, etc. And twine possibly for wilderness shelter building.

    Cover: GI Poncho, or larger tarp in a backpack. Plus tent pegs and spare cordage.
     
    ManVsLawn likes this.
  3. blacmud8

    blacmud8 Loaded Pockets

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    My main advice: Don't over think it.

    Alot of what to take depends on the climate and what you plan to do. If you're going to sleep out overnight and have a fire then you don't need too much stuff. If you're going to go for several days or longer then you'll need different stuff. Climate is v important. Let us know the climate and kind of surroundings you'll be in. It's impossible to advise on what to take to get some kip if we've no idea what temps/humidity/precipitation/wind/etc, you'll be in.

    In relatively benign conditions I think trial and error and erring on the side of taking too little is the way to go. In more serious conditions like cold or very wet and windy this could be dangerous, but most people don't go out to learn and practice bushcrafty stuff in those condtions. People seem to have a habit of overthinking and overpacking to the point that they don't actually ever experience the stillness and peace that (for me) going into the forest is all about. As I saw one blogger had written recently, now it's always called Wild Camping (tm) with endless gear related anxiousness. What a load of cobblers!
     
  4. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    Washington state, says it all.
     
  5. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    So I was thinking an essentials pouch/small sling would be good for the essentials/small tools (general porpose, woods and edc)

    Here what I was thinking:
    *My leatherman charge Tti + bit kit and extender.
    *My soldier model fire rod + spare bics and some stormproof matches maybe a mag block.
    *Tinder kit with cottonballs and vaseline (for wetter conditions), lint (for dryer conditions), tea light candles for light + reusable fire starter.
    *Little bit of cordage.
    *Duct Tape.
    *RITR Notepad and pencil(s)
    *Small Flashlight and batteries
    *Power Battery for phone.
    *Spare bandana.
    *Carabiners/sbiners for attatching wattle bottle to person on belt, and more cordage on pouch or belt.
     
  6. blacmud8

    blacmud8 Loaded Pockets

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    No, it doesn't. I have never been there and I'm not from the US.

    Here's my view on your list:

    Leatherman charge and bit kit is heavy and largely redundant. I've never found a bolt or a screw in the forest that needs tightening or loosening. I've never found the need to use pliers. Perhaps the can opener and knive would be useful.

    I use fire rod, magnesium block and one lighter.

    Cottonwool with vaseline will do for all conditions, so why carry other stuff?

    Cord is probably useful, I wouldn't bother with duct tape but it can be good for blisters.

    I wouldn't take the notepad. I've never ever desired the need to write something down.

    Headtorch > flashlight.

    What do you use a bandana for? I know, like RITR, they are very popular here, but I've never used or felt the need for one, so don't bother to carry one unless you know you will use it.

    Climbing crabs can be heavy and complete overkill. Get a little one, or better still just learn the appropriate knot to tie with all that cord you have.
     
    FL Woods Bum likes this.
  7. FL Woods Bum
    • In Omnia Paratus

    FL Woods Bum Your Grace!

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    Chester ..

    First, when are you planning to start your Bushcrafting adventures? Will you be going alone? I ask because we both know the weather in Seattle, WA right now and I don't see anything in your setup that will protect you from exposure... Don't take undue risks while you are practicing your Bushcraft skills. Stay closer to home than you would and make sure you take the necessary cold/wet weather gear to deal with a cold campsite in case you aren't able to get a fire going. This may sound rude, but it happens to everyone, and you are just starting out.. don't take the risks while you are learning, exposure will kill you quickly (although I am sure you know that growing up in Seattle). I will post some comments on your kit when I get back, but I wanted to post a weather forecast for the month for blacmud8

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. AK Adventurer

    AK Adventurer Ice, Ice, Tigre

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    Huh. It actually gets below freezing in the Seattle area in the winter? Didn't know that... Thought it stayed warmer there. (learn something new every day! :) )

    I'll wait till after FWB comments on stuff to add my thoughts on gear etc, he has a LOT more experiance than I do at this.... I'll defer to the more knowledgeable guy. :)
     
  9. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    Blacmud8, that was me being more sarcastic than anything just so you know. :)
    This was mainly my idea for a basic essentials pouch for general use for both EDC, with stuff like the Leatherman and bit accessories, and for woods, with stuff like the bandana, which btw is just so I can have a comfort item to wipe the mud off my hands with, and the cordage. The notepad and pencil is mainly just a comfort item for scribbling in and more notes for whatever reason. The fire making stuff is for both use in the woods and just to have some fire making stuff handy for backyard fires, but I suppose you are right about the cotton balls and Vaseline. The attachment biners were mainly just for convenience more than anything.

    But thanks for your input ;)
     
  10. Chester

    Chester Loaded Pockets

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    I will put my idea together of the small kit and put a picture up for visual aid. ;)
     
  11. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

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    Since you're also in the PNW, I'm assuming you already have a closet (or three) completely stuffed with brightly-colored jackets, fleece products, rain shells, parkas, gloves, hats, etc. :p Those are always good to have around. Exposure is the one thing that will polish you off in no time.

    In response to your questions, and take this all with a grain of salt because I'm not a full-time, hard-core bushcrafter -- but rather, more of a car camper and traveler:

    1. Definitely need something to keep the rain and weather off you (besides clothing), and then something to insulate you. Wool is a nice choice for a blanket, as is fleece, and they work better than cotton when wet. A heavy-duty reusable "Sportsman's Blankets" sits in our vehicle, as well as in a survival kit pack.
    2. Kind of a combination of camping bin + survival kit + vehicle gear & FAK, plus whatever is EDC for the day (usually on person + bag).
    3. Looked at Cabela's "Possibles Pouch". It's nice, but honestly, if I was going to be carting all of this stuff around, I'd rather have a backpack and keep two hands free. And I'd opt for simpler things like Kifaru's little zippered pockets and pullouts, or Topo Design's similar offerings, or Mystery Ranch's, or Goruck's pockets, etc. They can all be used now and down the road for other projects.

    I used to try and cram everything I could into small little bags, with sophisticated little kits and gadgets, and incorporate them all over the place. I've moved from that philosophy to instead maintaining larger (and sometimes heavier) K.I.S.S. gear that just plain works, and can be used day-to-day if needed for other tasks. For example, I ditched a tiny Petzl e+Lite and went with a Tactikka. Easier to find AAA batteries, longer battery life, more comfortable to wear, etc. That way I don't feel like I've got all this gear that's tied up in a "break glass in case of emergency" kit, never to be used.

    Anyway, I'm kind of rambling now... time to move along. :)
     
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