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Winter Bug Out/EDC

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by suburbDad, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. suburbDad

    suburbDad Loaded Pockets

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    hi all, do you see yourself changing out your bug out bag or edc gear due to changing of the seasons? The only thing I have added is more hand warmers, but aside from the wintery boots I wear, gloves, and a thicker jacket, what else would truly be different?
     
  2. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    I keep a pair of Yak Trax slip-on shoe traction devices in my car since the parking lot at my work is ginormous and usually fairly icy. I also make sure my car carry winter stuff is up-to-speed: blanket, folding shovel, FAK.
     
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  3. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    I've added, like you, hand-warmers, to my EDC pouch, plus a space blanket (which should stay there all seasons anyway as hypothermia is a 365 days a year potential risk).

    My EDC backpack has now also a larger heat belt (similar concept as hand-warmers, just larger, to be glued - like a band-aid - to ones lower back, to warm the lever where blood needs to come through).

    A buff (used to protect neck) is always in my EDC - but these days it's get used more often, depending on jacket and wind/temperatures.

    When real winter (below 0°C) will be here my wife will, always, highly recommend Nivea or other lotion to protect hand/face skin from drying out - and I will, as always, thankfully reject - as real men don't need lotion! :uhhuh:
     
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  4. SOS24
    • +2 Supporter

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    A wool balaclava or hat and neck gaiter provide good head/neck protection and warmth. Extra socks are also good to layer and swap if get wet.
     
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  5. JHGM

    JHGM Dinosaur Supervisor

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    I've got an entire bag that I throw in the truck in the winter months...

    Insulated bib overalls, several pairs of wool socks, gloves, caps, etc.

    Saved my hindquarters from freezing many times.
     
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  6. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    I don't change my EDC for the whole season since if I'm expecting cold weather, I'll pack for it but if not, I don't bother.
    I do make sure I have an extra coat, an extra think fleece, plenty of warm socks, a spare pair of boots, a second blanket and long johns in my car, in addition to my year-round gear
     
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  7. GoBliNuke

    GoBliNuke Loaded Pockets

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    Excluding clothing, the only thing that comes to mind is visibility aid - reflective patches.
     
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  8. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    I keep thick wool socks and a fleece convertible hood/scarf/face cover garment and some things in little tote in my truck year round. I add Hot Hands to my crisis bag on top of the SOL two person heat sheet I keep packaged in the bag year round.

    In my bag I recently added an Outdoor Research tobogan cap, fleece scarf, and my old 5.11 Praetorian gloves for the season. I also added my Snugpak jungle blanket in it's stuff sack to my bag this week since I recently changed out my GORUCK Bullet for a GR1.
     
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  9. suburbDad

    suburbDad Loaded Pockets

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    I get this theme of trying to keep warm. I like the idea of keeping a shovel in the car too.
     
  10. FORCEGC

    FORCEGC Loaded Pockets

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  11. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    there's quite some variation to your winter preparations, it would be interesting to know what conditions you are expecting and likely scenarios.
    My own prep:
    On body - dress according to the weather and activity. No real change to knife, lights and that stuff in my pockets.
    Backpack - I take my backpack everywhere, so it could almost be considered on body. I keep some outer garments here. In the summertime I might rotate these garments according to activity and weather forecast, but as winter approaches I will settle on carrying a superlight waterproof shell all the time. The worst conditions are really around 0C/32F, when you get heavy rain or sleet in combination with strong winds, but even when it gets very cold and dry, I sometimes pull on the rain pants. This reduces air circulation from winds and my own movement and actually provides much more warmth/isolation than one would think.
    Car - during winter I add a smallish bag with insulated outer garments, insulated boots, a water proof shell and high-vis vests.

    This might not sound as much for a person living in Norway. Where I live we can expect anything from about 41F to -13F and heavy rain, sleet, snow and strong winds, and the weather changes very fast. Still this covers my everyday needs quite well. I live in a city and commute by walking, driving or public transportation (I like variation). Biking too, actually, but that's a totally different scenario concerning EDC and preparation. For day to day activities I rarely drive into very remote areas, and even if my car brakes down in the worst thinkable place it will only be a few miles / km walk to get assistance.
    If I go further / taking more risk, it's usually a planned trip that I plan and pack specifically for. Many of those are backpacking trips, so I would be self reliant anyways.
     
  12. FiaOlleDog

    FiaOlleDog Loaded Pockets

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    Santa brought me a Jack Wolfskin Foggy Cap (kind of beanie) - I think I'm gonna love it once temperatures are falling below zero again.
     
  13. earthman

    earthman EDC Junkie!!!

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    You say biking, do you mean motorcycle or pedal cycle?

    I've always wondered how motorcyclists get on in countries that have months of snow/ice,...they just aren't a feasible form of transport I guess? Here in the UK I've ridden motorcycles almost daily, only snow/ice will stop me, I tried it once but it's just too dangerous, apart from me coming off, too many car drivers slide about.
     
  14. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    You guessed it right. Human powered bicycle it is. I have an older dedicated bike for winter use because it’s pretty hard use.
    Usually we see some daring motorcyclists on the road late in the fall when we start seeing ice on the roads, but they disappear soon enough. Motorcycle season is more or less late April to late September around here.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  15. Treya

    Treya Loaded Pockets

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    Living in Australia the summer where I am can be pretty harsh and waiting at a bus stop with no shade in 40 degree celcius weather is no fun though summer this year we have had a few torrential rains with high wind and some hail followed by humid overcast days. Winters are generally wet & frosty with icy winds coming off the mountains.

    Weather specific EDC includes:
    Summer: Small travel umbrella (for shade), filled water bottle, wide brim hat, small sachets of aloe vera burn gel (pale skin that burns easy), mini tube sunscreen.
    Winter: Small travel umbrella, burts bees lip balm for chapped lips, large square scarf that doubles as a shawl or small lap blanket (carried as extra to scarf worn), hot-hands heat packs (bag and pocket), fingerless gloves worn plus full finger gloves in backpack. Extra socks in case my feet get soaked. Couple of cough or menthol lozenges. Travel tissues and hand wipes. Torch gets carried on person as its dark earlier, reflective bands that go around my arms if needed for crossing busy roads etc. again darker earlier. Plastic bags for either wet umbrella or to cover bag in the rain. Some sugary snacks or crackers/nuts. I also tend to keep pain meds and tiger balm or muscle rub as neck tends to hurt more in cold weather. Sometimes I carry a cottom ball or an ear plug for earache from cold wind. I was going to add in one of the stick-on heatpacks you can get for back pain figuring they might be an option for keeping core temperature in winter.

    Otherwise I look outside to check weather before I leave for work and browse the weather app for the weekly forecast and again each morning before leave, wear weather appropriate clothing and shoes,

    At work in winter I usually keep a whole gammut of stuff at work as an open plan office usually means flu goes around like the plague. Boxes of extra soft tissues, various lozenges for anything from tickly cough, sore throat, blocked sinuses & chesty cough. Glen 20 (disinfectant spray) as well as eucalyptus spray (also disinfectant). Various tea, honey & hot drinks such as cuppa soup or hot choc. Bottle of garlic tablets with vitamin C and horseradish. I wipe down my work phone if someone sick uses it (handset and buttons) and well as my keyboards/mouse. I also do not share my pen with anyone. In the department during sick season I clean benches, door handles, fridge handles, photocopier touch screens and light switches. My hubby is type 1 diabetic and more at risk so I try to be as careful as I can without being a germaphobe. We have a nurse that comes around to do free flu vaccinations if people choose.

    People come in to work with the flu and it makes multiple rounds through the office, just a constant round of sick people sharing it around for months.