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Why do Saber ground blades seem harder to sharpen than full-flat ground blades?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by afultz075, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. afultz075

    afultz075 Loaded Pockets

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    Can someone explain to me why Saber-ground blades seem much harder to sharpen than FFG blades? I have 4 carry knives I rotate through - a FFG Endura, a SOG Flash II (also FFG), a serrated Endura (saber), and a PE Endura (saber). I use a sharpmaker on all of them. I can get the FFG Endura and Flash II hair shaving sharp in a few minutes. Serrated edge knives I find easy to sharpen on the SM regardless of grind. The saber ground PE Endura however, is much, much harder to sharpen to an acceptable level and never seems to get as sharp as the FFG blades. I have noticed this on other saber-ground Spydies i've owned in the past.
     
  2. jujigatame

    jujigatame Loaded Pockets

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    I can't say I've ever experienced this between the two grinds you mention. Given that you get good results with the saber ground serrated blade I'm not sure why the plain edge would be substantially different. Have you colored the edge bevel with a sharpie on the knife in question to check your angles?
     
  3. Yablanowitz

    Yablanowitz Loaded Pockets

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    It is possible your dissatisfaction is the result of the blade thickness behind the edge bevel. Flat saber grinds such as the Endura tend to be rather thick behind the edge (a couple of mine measured 0.050" at the top of the edge bevel at 40 degrees included), while the full flat grinds tend to be a bit thinner (usually around 0.025" on Spyderco). The saber grind blade gets thicker faster as well, so when you are cutting thick material, the blade has to force the material aside more quickly. The end result can be a blade that is shaving sharp, but gives a lot of resistence when cutting anything thicker than hair. I turned my VG-10 saber-grind Endura into a Scandi grind for that very reason, and I had Tom Krein flat-grind a ZDP Endura to 0.010" thick behind the edge bevel.
     
  4. solocanoe

    solocanoe Empty Pockets

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    I guess I'm what you'd call a user - most of the terminology of blades is beyond what I need to know to be happy with my knives.

    I've always liked FFG's better, I don't know why. I've always used an arkansas stone and done it by hand for decades...
    perhaps the FFG gave me an easier "glide angle" for my hand? dunno...but that's the way it is. for me.

    recently I've found / bought / use the lansky system and love it. but I'm still using FFG's.