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Who Carries a Tourniquet?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by jeremiahak, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. jeremiahak

    jeremiahak Loaded Pockets

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    How many of you guys are EDC'ing a tourniquet? I mean on your person all the time? What other BOK type medical stuff do you carry in pockets or on your belt? I'm just thinking of building a pocket kit to use as a firearms carry guy. Thanks
     
  2. KMAC179

    KMAC179 Loaded Pockets

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    ^ that.

    I have 2 in my EDC pack
     
  3. smellypaddler

    smellypaddler Loaded Pockets

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    I don't carry one all the time but there is one in my car kit.

    On me pretty much all of the time is a set of gloves, CPR face shield and a couple of Aspirin.

    If I'm carrying a gun then I'm carrying a tourniquet but here in Australia I only have long arms as licensing for short arms is too much of a pain in the neck.
     
  4. TinCan

    TinCan Loaded Pockets

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    I got one in a small BOK I keep in my jacket.
    I got another CAT T in my back pocket, mainly to cushion my wallet. lol
    BTW, I like CATs because they offer the windlass device.
     
  5. Exploriment

    Exploriment Loaded Pockets

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  6. NCMedic

    NCMedic Loaded Pockets

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    I have started carrying one in my pocket while at work(Paramedic, our units have at least 6 CATs and probably more to come) and otherwise am not too far away from a BOK/IFAK any other time. I put my range BOK in my pocket when I am at the range.
    I have yet to start carrying a IFAK on me 24/7 but like a lot of other things I should do I haven't yet.

    Sent from this using that.....
     
  7. Ubiquitous

    Ubiquitous Loaded Pockets

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    Carry a bandana, it will work as a Tourniquet and much more. It will be more useful in wider range of situations.
     
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  8. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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  9. Al Effendi

    Al Effendi Loaded Pockets

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    I keep a length of surgical tubing around for, like, whatever. 6' for $17 at the big box hardware stores.


    --Al
     
  10. Exploriment

    Exploriment Loaded Pockets

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    After more than a decade of the GWOT, there is not a single military organization/protocol, etc. that advocates jury rigging surgical tubing, paracord, bandanas, etc. as a tourniquet to deal with traumatic amputation.

    I think that’s what a detective would call a clue.

    If you think you may ever need a tourniquet, get a proper tourniquet.
     
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  11. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    When you start to twist the bandana with a pen or what ever you use, you pull it sideways too, and it will roll up and will become very narrow.. A tq would idealy have to be as wide a possible, and that is not possible with a bandana.. I recomend you look into a tq.


    After reading alot and talking to my EMT instructors (many former or still active medivac/combat medics) i decided to go with the swat-t and carry two of those.. It is highly effective and test have shown it to be more effective than the CAT's (i will forward documentation if anyone is interrested in reading about it).. It is extremely versatile and can be used for alot if things other than a tq.. As i undestand it is becoming widely popular among police forces and emt's. (One major point against it is.. Two hand operation only, so no-go for military use) i carry the blue model.
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    I get what you are saying, but why wouldn't a bandana work as a field expedient tourniquet in the same way the triangular bandage in this video is being used?

    The fact that something is not the proper tool for the job shouldn't preclude it from being used if that's all you have to work with.
     
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  13. SAKplumber
    • In Omnia Paratus

    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I like the video, but think it was funny that he said he only carries three things, and then points to the list of four, and then even uses a caribiner and key ring on top of that:p
    Reminded me of this
     
  14. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    LOL, Steve Martin is the best!

    You know, Jeremiahak's original question was about carrying a tourniquet on your person. The only one that is really small and, more importantly, flat enough to be pocket carried is the SWAT-T Kapow mentioned. Even the bare bones TK-4 would not feel comfortable in its factory packaging in a pocket.

    Don't get me wrong, I think you should have access to the real deal, I have the real deal very close by the vast majority of the time, but given what we know about Murphy, what's wrong with an improvised backup plan?
     
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  15. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    So, on the one end of our kitchen island there is a little room where I toss my wallet and whatnot. Over time, it get cluttered up with other stuff I drop off there. Eventually, my wife orders me to clean it up. Just now was one of those times. In my little mess was a Mammut carabiner. Since I already have the bandana...

    After some experimenting with the bandana and the carabiner in a manner similar to what the video shows, here is what I've learned. The bandana isn't big enough to go around a normal sized man's upper thigh. It will go around the lower thigh. Used over the pants, the pants will get caught up in the "knot" as you twist. Since I am in shorts today, it was easy enough to try it against the skin without my wife wondering if I still had all my marbles. Better, but not great. The knot twists on itself the same way a towel does when you really wring it out. On my most successful attempt, I did make my foot go numb. While not scientific, I'd have to conclude that it was working.

    As for putting it on my arm, it is much more difficult to do because you are one handed. Not impossible, just difficult enough that I think if you were self-administering it, your odds at being successful are not good in the time you would have. That said, to get a SWAT-T on the arm tight by yourself would be difficult too, so...

    Bottomline, I still think a Macgyvered set up may work under certain circumstances.
     
  16. Exploriment

    Exploriment Loaded Pockets

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    Copy and paste “Sarfaraz Shah” into a search engine and watch the video. (And I have to warn you it is extremely graphic and very disturbing.)

    In a nut shell it shows a young man in Karachi shot at point blank range by a 7.62 rifle, and dying within quite literally seconds.

    So you are unlucky enough to be at the scene of a gang shooting or a terrorist bombing and someone is grievously injured and is suffering from an arterial bleeder. There is a very good chance that you will be in shock, and dealing with all the effects of an adrenaline dump, ie lacking fine motor controls, etc. The idea that you are going to get out your bandana and a pen and a key ring or a carabiner and then calmly and quickly fashion that into a tourniquet, in time to stop someone from losing so much blood that they die - is delusional.

    If you are advocating this sort of thing, you need to watch the video I mentioned above. You really need to watch it. Just so you can understand how incredibly irresponsible and dangerous what you’re saying is. That video will show you how shockingly quickly someone dies. The idea that you are going to be jury rigging something to administer life saving first aid on someone screaming, writhing in agony, spurting blood by the bottle full, with you possibly in shock over it - is bovine pooh.

    There is an adage in the military - you don’t rise to the occasion; you revert to the level of your training. If this is not something you have practiced over and over and over and over and over - ie, McGyvering a tourniquet, with shaking hands, on a writhing, screaming patient - you will likely not be doing it fast enough to make a difference.

    These and the inevitable “oh I’ll just use some parachute cord to tie off someone’s leg if they get bit by a snake”, is just so much twaddle from people who have no idea what they are talking about. Be quiet, and stop spreading misinformation.

    If you think you may ever need a tourniquet, get a proper tourniquet, and don’t rely on “I think this might work in a pinch” nonsense.
     
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  17. SAKplumber
    • In Omnia Paratus

    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Well, that kinda is the first line of the story you linked to the Boston marathon..."Doctors credit many lives saved to quick use of belts, shirts and other material"...so its a good back up...but back up is all it should be.

    I agree. There is nothing better for a real world experience than training. Saying your gonna "just use your paracord" is like saying "I'm not going to bother being prepared by being trained, I'll just pull it out of my nether regions and it'll work, guaranteed...let me just untie this grappling hook":rolleyes_revamped:

    I have a lack of real training. The next best things is the real tourniquet and having read the directions many, many times. Even then, I hope I never have someone relying on me.
     
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  18. Al Effendi

    Al Effendi Loaded Pockets

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    Funny thing is, I got it to build an enormous slingshot. I had some left over, so I threw it in my BOK. Figured it'd be good for something. Emergency slingshot repair?
     
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  19. Montani

    Montani Loaded Pockets

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    Speaking from 10 years as an EMT and 5 years as a medical first responder with my current employer, a tourniquet is a last resort for someone who has been trained to know when to apply one. The reasoning is that tourniquets are being used and causing more damage vs. if they were not used. If you choose to carry one, get some training on when it should be applied.
     
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