1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

WHEN/IF THEY ASK...

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by iPREFERPi, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. iPREFERPi

    iPREFERPi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    110
    I don't believe this infringes on the break-room policy (Personal Blog?) let me know if I'm wrong.

    I've accepted an offer from another employer.

    I believe in being as courteous as possible in the transition process; therefore I'm giving notice BUT have the following questions:
    • When you've given notice, how did YOU respond when your, soon to be former, employer asked "where are you going?" [B/]
    • If you have reason to believe they are/will be petty how have you protected your rep? [B/]
     
    JonSidneyB, ManVsLawn and MTFatboy like this.
  2. jag-engr
    • Administrator

    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Messages:
    5,481
    Likes Received:
    4,000
    No infringement - this is a great topic.

    I told them. I figured they'd figure out soon, anyway. Granted, every situation is different.

    Present your notice in writing in a formal, dated letter - not a memo or an email. Don't air grievances or ramble. Make it short, courteous, and to the point. Make it clear that you are not negotiating, you are just giving them notice.
    If you feel that they will be petty about it, make sure you retain a copy of the letter. Immediately explain the situation to close coworkers before it comes from the boss, but not before giving notice.
     
    0dBm, wrath0r, Crippletron and 3 others like this.
  3. jonny8642

    jonny8642 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    1,098
    To kind of echo and add to what jag-engr stated to and give you some examples of what I've dealt with
    When you've given notice, how did YOU respond when your, soon to be former, employer asked "where are you going?"

    Depends on the situation and what is your current working relationship with your employer? I had a previous employer that I did not tell due to it was a very hostile work environment and I knew what they've done to previous people leaving. When they did find out they sent out emails slandering my work ethic and character to my new employer at the time and our potential customers/working partners. Granted is the worse case scenario you could get yourself into and my employer at the time knew everything that was going on, because I was honest with them and told them i thought they would have left me alone. In the end we ended up going to court for a defamation of character suet and I'm not going to say I won because I sued the bastards and got a settlement and my previous boss was terminated from her job because of it. But it was a learning experience of how bad it could get and I still wish they would have just left me alone and kept the chip on their shoulders to themselves.

    Now when I left my other 2 positions I told them where I was going and what the offer was to see if they would counter it with a better offer. Again this depends on your relationship with your employer, are you willing to stay there, as well will your employer treat you the same or better knowing either you're looking or other companies are contacting you. This worked at one place but in the end that better offer came along that they could not meet or were not willing to meet it and you have to make the decision yourself.

    One quote I've always kept in the back of my mind when it comes to pay/job negotiations is "A promise in business is only as good as the piece of paper it is written on." if you're staying or going that keeps people accountable.

    If you have reason to believe they are/will be petty how have you protected your rep?

    That's a risk you're gonna have to take, you have no control over what other people do. I can't add much to what jag-engr added, other then if you have a boss that lived in another state and you do not see them. Your resignation letter should be an attachment in an email going to your direct boss and your HR rep and BCC yourself for your records that is it.

    If they give you an exit interview and they ask the series of question of "why are you leaving and what could we have done to make it better", try to keep your cool and be professional with your grievances even if they're not.

    Apparently I had more to add to this then I thought. But good luck in your transition in the end it's about you and what makes you happy.
     
    rangetroop likes this.
  4. baccar-3

    baccar-3 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,489
    Likes Received:
    7,613
    To whom it may concern: Date

    This letter is to inform you that I am resigining my position as________at_______.
    The reason for this is that due to the enhancement of my skills through study and experience; I have been offered a position at another company at
    a higher level of responsibility.
    I have accepted this position and will begin employment two weeks from above date.
    Due to the non-compete nature of my future employment I am unable to give further details.
    I am appreciative of the time I spent here and wish you the best in your future endeavors.

    Sincerely:
    ----
     
  5. iPREFERPi

    iPREFERPi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    110
    I moved to a smaller market a few years back. I have worked and lived in smaller towns before but this was a culture shock. I have spent the last few years just trying to wrap my head around how I can be in the same country and have such totally different culture (and not in a good way).
    I mostly worry about my reputation. The boss has this great ability to present an image of a nice guy when he's not really. The things I've witnessed have convinced me of that. Opinions are opinions; people will form them and are entitled to them. The qualities I respect and wish to emulate will remain the same, but I still want to ensure my name is protected.
    The attitude in this town is probably 40 years behind the times. Remote enough that government representation is minimal so things get done that shouldn't and those that buck the trend are either run out or run down. Not looking forward to the potential blowback...

    Can't help but be reminded of the quote attributed to Twain:

    "I've lived through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened."
     
    Last edited by iPREFERPi, Jan 29, 2016
    JonSidneyB and jonny8642 like this.
  6. GrayMouser

    GrayMouser EDC Junkie!!!!!

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,428
    Likes Received:
    5,816
    I've worked for some mean and petty people in the past, and I always subscribed to the theory of "less is more" when talking about a new opportunity. I knew I was a good person and a hard worker, and that would speak for me more than what someone from a past job would ever say about me.

    If someone's going to put you down for moving on and trying to better yourself, then I say :censored: 'em.

    I've been a retail manager for 22 years, and I've lost a handful of really good associates over the years. If they were going to a better job, I always wished them well (and meant it).

    Bottom line, just be respectful and professional. Hopefully he can do the same.
     
    kikissabiz and jonny8642 like this.
  7. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    5,470
    Likes Received:
    3,912
    Reputation is all one has. Protect yourself by having as many favorable professional and personal references both inside and outside the industry in which you ply your trade. Good luck with the new venture.
     
    jag-engr, iPREFERPi and jonny8642 like this.
  8. Devon Scout

    Devon Scout Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2015
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    1,212
    I've recently had to give two reference details. Problem I found is that for my last two jobs everyone who knew me simply aren't there anymore.

    In one job people have retired, moved on and even passed away. The other I've no idea who is there, but I know that the managers have all moved on. Thankfully in one someone has retired but I still keep in touch with her and have her personal address, so problem solved. The other they allowed me to give my Scouting Group Leaders details. She has known me for sometime now and can provide a reference. My new boss said that this reference if anything was better as it was for something I like doing rather than something I simply had to do.

    But generally my advice would be leave on as best terms as possible. Be polite, explain that you have enjoyed working there, and explain you have had a offer that you wish to peruse. All the very best in your new role.
     
    iPREFERPi likes this.
  9. Strayz

    Strayz Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    678
    First things first.

    You are moving on. Be polite and professional. If asked where you are going just tell them you decline to answer. If they want to counter offer or not it is up to them.

    Remember that jobs come and go. You will be better off either way, and there is very little any bad employer can really do to you. Small town or not your work ethic is your best asset. Do not fear being unemployed, it is ok to be concerned, but do not let working in a hell hole make 1/3rd of your life bad. Move on.
     
    iPREFERPi likes this.
  10. iPREFERPi

    iPREFERPi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    110
    Thanks everyone for your input. This is why I really enjoy this group; So many positive responses!
    UPDATE:
    I tendered my resignation & it went well. Leaving on good terms.
     
  11. iPREFERPi

    iPREFERPi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    110
    UPDATED UPDATE:
    Keeping in this thread to keep context and so other might be able to benefit without hunting around.
    Here goes
    New employer wants an NDA & Non-Compete clause signed.
    First off, I will be speaking with legal counsel.
    Still, I would like your thoughts on what to ask.
    While I respect the intent I am a little concerned with the one sided nature of the document.
    Also, I believe that cards should be on the table before employment commences. There's huge potential that a person would decline an offer should they be aware of the contents.
    Specifically, what would you ask an employer for with respects to "new consideration" being that they didn't provide this info at start of employment?

    *edited weird punctuation & coding errors
     
  12. Strayz

    Strayz Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    678
    Don't worry about NDA or non compete clauses. From past chatting with legal types they are unenforceable unless you purposely take trade secrets or take the job with the intention of stealing trade secrets or purposely to do damage to a company. Then it is up to them to prove it, and actually prove damages. It can be difficult at best and most likely will get there case thrown out of court.

    If for some unseen reason they let you go for any reason (Fired or laid off), they can not keep you from having a job in the field you have been working in (as long as you can show a history of working in the field). The courts and uncle sam have weighed in, rather than collecting unemployment they want you working.

    I have had employers tell me that I can not work in the same field (Information Tech) after working for them (I laughed). I left their place of work to go for a direct competitor (Contractor working for an agency, so who was surprised that a contractor would go from one contract to another?). They tried suing me. They lost. The Judge told them outright that no company holds any Sword of Damocles over anyone's head to keep them from earning a living and then made them pay out what they were trying to go after me for damages. The Judge did remind me that I should be a little more disconcerting in whom I go to work for, but that he understood putting food on the table and a roof over my head were first priorities.

    Most NDA's and Non compete clauses only last 6 months to 2 years, again totally unenforceable. I would say just make sure they don't know where you are going to and who you plan on contacting to start a new job if you really are worried about it. Most companies like to use them a a scare tactic to keep people from just up and leaving.
     
  13. iPREFERPi

    iPREFERPi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    110
    Thanks for the response. Uncle Sam is more like a cousin to me (North of the 49th).
    Sounds about the same up here. Just a little concerned with the wording. Appears to have been a "cut and paste" do it yourself deal. So not especially concerned.
    Thanks again.

    *edited spelling error