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What to put in a Dog first aid kit?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by Weko, May 2, 2014.

  1. Bowman1911

    Bowman1911 EDC Mechanic

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    Hydrogen peroxide. 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs of dog. My female short hair got ahold a rat poison when she was a pup. Long story!
    Anyways, I'd also add a bottle of mineral oil. Works wonders for bowel obstructions!!! Soak a slice of high fiber bread. Walmart has one variety that has 12mg of fiber per slice (can't remember the brand, but check the nutritional value). I couldn't find any other variety with more than 10mg. Soak both sides of the bread in the mineral oil. A dog that can't keep this down needs serious vet attention, and is probably dieing! Wait an hour & repeat bread soaked mineral oil once if needed. Will clean out any obstruction they have! Long story even longer, my female short hair, again, chewed down my azalea bush (which happens to only be poisonous to dogs, cats, & horses). She got down & wouldn't even walk. Throwing up anything we gave her & apparently the azalea had blocked her bowels. Vet was full on that Sunday & said we could bring her, wait all day, & she still wouldn't be seen. 2 slices of high fiber bread with a stump dose of mineral oil & she was fine. The bread also acts as a binder to pull any unwanted material out of the dogs gut. I give it to all 3 of my dogs about once or twice a month now.
    As for snakebites. Last year they brought out a rattlesnake shot series for dogs. It's a physical with a shot, a secondary dose at I think 3 months, and follow up shots every 6. They'll save your dogs life if you take 'em backcountry! Not many vets administer 'em yet, but your vet will know who does in your area.
     
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  2. Bowman1911

    Bowman1911 EDC Mechanic

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    [​IMG]
    Lady's on the left, Duke's on the right.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    And here's Oliver.
     
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  3. Shur
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Shur Loaded Pockets

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    Picked up 2 rolls of 'vet wrap', one with a no-chew flavour deterent and tossed in a few sterile pads.
     
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  4. Bowman1911

    Bowman1911 EDC Mechanic

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    Our dogs are our young'uns, so me & the better half are a bit of dog nuts! Duke is the reason I've got 2 titanium anchors in my left forearm now.
     
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  5. nosnerosen

    nosnerosen Loaded Pockets

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    +1. My wife is a vet tech and that's her clinics preceded method. We have big dogs and put 1/4 cup peroxide and a cup of water and pour down the dogs throat to induce vomiting if necessary. It works quickly, so suggest doing it outside. You could carry a small squeeze bottle with enough for one use. Check with your vet on how much to use for your dog's size.
     
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  6. LauraQ

    LauraQ Loaded Pockets

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    +1 on the irrigation syringe. My dog recieved a bite from another dog last weekend. I wish I had an irrigation syringe handy to flush out the wounds.

    BTW, Wal-Mart has big rolls of 3M Vetrap in their pet department (with the horse items) at less than $2.

    Great thread!
     
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  7. edjo69

    edjo69 EDC Junkie

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    We hike in snake country, so in addition to our first aid kit we also carry a snake bite kit.
     
  8. ZombieFan81

    ZombieFan81 Loaded Pockets

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    I would throw in a dose of flea prevention (not a flea collar or other crap that doesn't work. Frontline plus or something comparable) and a dose of heart worm prevention. Even though they aren't exactly emergency items if you ever had to evacuate your home you might be gone when you would normally give them there monthly doses so it might be helpful to have. Also some non-stick pads, the regular 4x4 pads you mentioned are fine for cleaning but they can get stuck in to the wound. The non-stick pads can and do stick sometimes but usually not as bad. Also I think someone else mentioned it but something to rinse a wound with.
     
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  9. Hunter Nelson

    Hunter Nelson Loaded Pockets

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    Awesome topic! I was just thinking about this today, picked up some fruitful info!
     
  10. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    diphenhydramine, aspirin, cortisone cream, antibiotic ointment (any kind) are all acceptable as far as meds go

    there are some special treatments for pad cuts and tears, good tweezers are an idea, one of those "expandable," rubbery bowls, and vet wrap (Coban but chaper) are good ideas

    look at pre-existing kits and download pet first aid apps, integrate what you need or can use; I bought the Red Cross Pet First Aid app, mostly just to see what was in it, for like $0.99, and it's not bad

    Merck's Veterinary Manual is free on the web and great if you have the science background, and the Dog Owner's Home Veterinary Handbook is good and inexpensive - I bought it for my wife when I realized our 12 year old had renal insufficiency - vet confirmed
     
  11. GFD

    GFD Empty Pockets

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    This is the kit I keep at the house or throw in the truck if I take the dogs out

    [​IMG]

    Inside

    [​IMG]

    Bandaging and wound care

    [​IMG]

    Medications

    [​IMG]

    Cleaning supplies and tools

    [​IMG]


    Let me know if there's any questions!


    All work and no play is no good at all work!
    -Stubs
     
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  12. Shur
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    Yeah, any chance of you packing that stuff up in a nylon pouch and selling the kit? (Smaller version of the kit?)

    This is better than the kit I've got for my wife and I.
    Do you run into injured animals often?
     
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  13. GFD

    GFD Empty Pockets

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    This kit is more for my Dogs. Ive actually redid it last night to make it all fit nicely in a LAPG bug out bag and threw a couple bottles of water and leashes in there. I am on the Local Large animal response team but we get calls for about anything related to animals. PM me if your interested in a kit. I have about enough supplies to make 6 more kits.
     
  14. AK47Uprising

    AK47Uprising Loaded Pockets

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    Not sure if it's been mentioned yet but I've got some sutures and a skin stapler both made by oasis for veterinary use; might not be a bad idea to include something of the sort.
     
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  15. Grav
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    Small animal vet here just wanted to make a few additions:

    All the wound stuff from your normal fak applies well other then bandaids. so stuff to clean wounds, clot blood, and apply pressure are good. Vet wrap as mentioned before is great stuff. A lot can be done with just vetwrap and 3x3 gauze pads. I wouldn't bother with trying to suture. Most animals won't tolerate it and you have to be careful about sealing in foreign material and bacteria. However if you need a quick temporary closure a surgical skin stapler works great especially with a topical anesthetic. Also, superglue works well for foot pad lacerations.

    For inducing vomiting hydrogen peroxide can work but can also cause some pretty serious damage to the stomach. If you can get a vet to prescribe you some, apomorphine capsules work amazingly well. You snap open the capsule and dump some of the powder inside their eyelid where it is absorbed. They will start vomiting within a couple of minutes. When you want them to stop vomiting, rinse the remaining powder out of their eye with saline (this is really important to do).

    Benedryl is good to have. Give 1mg/lb for stings or allergic reactions.

    Appropriately sized muzzle. Even good dogs will bite if painful or stressed.
    An extra slip lead or leash
    Water
    Meds your dog may take/have been prescribed (particularly if they take pain meds/Nsaids)

    That's all I can think of at the moment. I'll add more if I come up with anything.
     
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  16. nick50471

    nick50471 Loaded Pockets

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    I have German Shorthairs and have need to stitch them up more than once. I now carry a skin stapler. Much easier on me and the dog.

    I also carry a good check cord. I have used it for lots of different things.
     
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  17. BlueTrain

    BlueTrain Loaded Pockets

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    I just have to say that threads like this raise my level of appreciation of this forum a notch or two.
     
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  18. Shur
    • In Omnia Paratus

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    I'm going to add a set of balloon boots to mine.
    My dog seems to gouge/slice his pads on just about anything and they would be good to keep the vet wrap clean/dry.
     
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  19. Firepoint

    Firepoint Loaded Pockets

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    Hey, that's a lot of shorthairs on one forum! I've got 4 myself.

    Vetwrap is the greatest stuff. I also carry a leatherman to help pull porcupine quills. Polysporin, Benadryl, aspirin, metacam, and some prescription drugs for my old dog are all useful stuff. We have also used quickstop powder (mostly to stop bleeding when toenails are cut too short).

    We carry a stapler as well, but only my buddies dog ever gets to use it. 3 separate occasions that dog has been stapled up after meeting with a wire fence. Anything too serious and the dog goes to the vet. The first aid kit is typically just to keep blood off my truck seats.

    Pepto caplets and canned pumpkin are also useful items to have around the house to give to a dog with a bad case of diarrhea.
     
  20. nick50471

    nick50471 Loaded Pockets

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    Porcupine quills are easy once you know to clip them first.