1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

What happened to the .22?

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by jackknife, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. Dirty Bob

    Dirty Bob Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    15
    I was at a range not too long ago, and the spot next to me had two "yoots" in it with a Browning Hi-Power in .40 S&W, with a laser sight, of course. Their 7-yard target was almost pristine! Not to mention how "pleasant" it is to have a .40 being fired a couple of feet away.

    I was shooting a 9x18mm Makarov and having a relaxing session, while they didn't seem to be having a whole lot of fun. I think they expected to have one ragged hole in the center of the black, and they were having trouble keeping their shots on the paper.

    Jackknife is right: everyone should start with a .22LR. It's great for establishing -- and then keeping -- good habits. A .22 is also about the most enjoyable of all guns for target shooting and plinking. Hey, it's a lot of fun to shoot slugs, round ball handloads, and buckshot from my NEF Youth Pardner 20ga. with a 22" barrel, but an afternoon of that much recoil and muzzle blast would leave me feeling wrung out. An afternoon with an accurate .22LR bolt action, on the other hand, is simply enjoyable. It's also a great way to introduce people to the shooting sports.

    The comment on the cost of the gun vs. the cost of ownership is right on. A good .22LR is a very good value, even if it costs 2/3 or 3/4 the price of a "real" gun. It's also very difficult to wear out a quality .22, but I'm trying! ;)

    Regards,
    Dirty Bob
     
  2. Toolboy

    Toolboy Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    0
    First gun I ever shot was an old early 1900's pump .22. Dad loaded it with .22 shorts and we'd go to the range and fire that thing off. It was great. My dad still has that rifle and I've already staked a claim to it "some day".

    Now I'm wanting to buy a rifle for my son to start shooting. Funny thing is, he insisted on shooting my AR one day and loved it. I'm thinking of trying to pick up a .22 like my Dad's, or maybe buy one of those small bolt-actions. I have a Ruger 10-22 already (shot once in 20 years) but I wanted to start the boy off on something very basic so he gets the shooting, not just the gadgetry.

    On another note---- For those who doubt the power of the .22, I had read an article in recent years with homicide statistics. More people had been killed by .22 caliber bullets than anything else. I also remember the butcher coming out to the farm to butcher a cow or pig. He always started it out with a headshot from a .22.
     
  3. Dirty Bob

    Dirty Bob Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    15
    ...And with kiddos, a single shot is better, IMHO. It helps them to focus on sighting and making each shot count. Semiautos don't teach an immature beginner much. My nephew won't even find out about my 10/22 until he's old enough and mature enough. Right now, he needs to develop his shooting skills -- and his patience.

    Regards,
    Dirty Bob
     
  4. Pantex

    Pantex Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    2
    Favorite 22's were / are Beretta 70/71S , Mod 74 Winchester, Mod 317 S&W, Ruger Mk 1, H&R 999 and the Ruger 10-22.
     
  5. NinjaClerk

    NinjaClerk Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    God bless the .22!!

    I have three rifles: My Dad's single-shot bolt-action Winchester Model 67; My Grandfather's Remington Nylon 66 and my Ruger 10/22. For pistols, I've got a S&W 422, Magnum Research Mountain Eagle and a Taurus 94. In all honesty, I can say that I have more fun with those guns when I go out to the rock quarry than when I take out the bigger calibers. Long live the .22!! :highfive:
     
  6. 1*

    1* Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    With ammunition becoming scarce and the dramatic increase in price, I am deinetlry picking up a .22 pistol for practice. Also considering picking up a GSG5 after getting a look at Salt's or a conversion kit for my Stag 2T.
     
  7. fropstar

    fropstar Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    It’s what i learnt to shoot with, even owned a Dralov before all pistols got banned over here (UK).
     
  8. DB

    DB Kilted Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Messages:
    4,144
    Likes Received:
    67
    I'm considering picking up a second .22 handgun for plinking and the range so my wife can join me. I taught her how to shoot on my Ruger, and she enjoyed the fact that she could control it better than my "big scary guns".
     
  9. jonny8642

    jonny8642 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    My aunt and step uncle just bought their first hand gun the other day. 9mm Glock and we all went to the range and it was the same thing I had my 22 and they had their 9mm. Even at that small of a caliber atleast when comparing it to others that they wanted they almost went with a 45 :slap:. they couldn't keep a good cluster, my step uncle (who has the biggest wanna be tough guy attitude I've seen). Never has owned a gun never shot a gun in his whole life (53 years old this guy) was giving me crap because I was shooting my 22. I've been shooting since I was a kid with my grandpa, dad and yes boy scouts but when it came time to change he got more upset that I could still put five in the bulls-eye with my first 6 shoots(I was warmed up that is the only reason why I did that good) then what he could with shooting 12 with either or :(.
     
  10. bigfoot

    bigfoot Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,804
    Likes Received:
    1,311
    Just went back in time here to earlier days... I remember as a kid getting a Crosman BB gun from my uncle for Christmas. After many hours upon hours of shooting tin cans, glass bottles, and trying to hit the occasional squirrel, he give me a used Winchester .22 rifle. After covering basic gun safety he took me out to shoot numerous times. He also made sure I completed a hunter safety class.

    Years later, after college, I decided it would be fun to get back into shooting. I built up a small collection, joined my local range, tried to shoot when I could, and then attended a concealed carry class. This same uncle later surprised me by passing along a pump-action Remington .30-06 and scope. Then after hearing enough of the rhetoric and politics on the 2nd Amendment, I decided to join the NRA.

    None of this would have happened if someone hadn't taken the time to get me started and instill a great respect for firearms.
     
  11. lwt210

    lwt210 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    To the original poster....

    I feel your pain and agree with you.

    When I was five or six years old, my uncles put a double action 9 shot H&R revolver in my hands that was chambered in .22 long rifle. I would imagine such activity these days would cause a blind running panic among the masses. But back then in 1976, it wasn't a big deal to see a small child being supervised in the use of firearms. They would let me burn through 100 round packs of ammunition shooting at a creek on a dirt road down the street from grandma's house. We would spend time shooting at cans, snakes, bottles....whatever folks had tossed into that creek.

    I don't remember hitting much when I first started but before long, those walks down to the creek had produced a young shooter that could hold his own with that 9 shot revolver. They taught me that holy trinity you speak of. When I got good with the H&R, they brought along a single shot .22 rifle that I could finally hold and I started all over learning how to hit with the longer, heavier rifle.

    Those trips to grandma's house/farm were always my favorite activities. As I got older, I was trusted to take the H&R out by myself and I would estimate that I have shot a truckload of .22lr over those childhood years. My younger cousins were brought up the same way and I fondly remember my grandpa bringing us back a brick of .22 for each grandson and off we would go into the acreage that he and grandma owned. Again, the kind of thing that would cause modern day sheep to gasp and consult therapist to deal with it.

    BUT....those experiences were INVALUABLE to me later on in life. I was always fond of firearms and bought dozens over the years of my late teens and adulthood. And I would sometimes have to have the latest wondernine or 1911 just like my peers. The difference was that I could print tight groups with my toys while my friends and coworkers could barely get on paper at 25 yards.

    Flash forward to 1996 when I entered the police academy. Firearms training was dreaded by most as hardly any of them had ever fired a handgun in their lives. I, on the other hand, relished the thought of burning through "free" to me ammo and did well earning a perfect score on every course. Now, I am with a different agency and have fired 11 years of perfect scores on the range. I have shooting awards and proudly display the "Distinguished Expert" shooting pin. Fellow officers come to me when they need help with their techniques and I am held in high regard at work on all things shooting related.

    I can attest that everything, the trophies, the awards, the accolades, and the respect of my peers all started with shooting .22lr firearms and learning to shoot them correctly. To this day, I will not visit a shooting range without taking a brick of .22lr ammo and burning through it with one of my many rimfire firearms. Even though I have a safe full of stuff to play with, my favorites are my Marlin 39, Ruger 10-22 (tricked out), and my Ruger MkIII.

    I feel sorry for guys that can't grow up like that. My son is turning ten this year and he already has two rimfires in the safe. His first was a Marlin 15 Little Buckaroo and he learned the trinity well. He's safe, he's accurate and hopefully, he will continue to shoot when I am long gone and pass the tradition down to his children.

    So all is not lost, original poster. There are some of us out here that love the .22 and know it's value and importance in grooming the marksmen of the future.

    Regards.
     
  12. Mitty

    Mitty Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    3
    Amen. When I go to the range, the question is simply which .22 will I take in addition to whatever center-fire gun I will be shooting. The High Standard .22 short Olympic? Lots of fun! Another High Standard? The Hammerli 208S, which is a work of machinist's art? I don't generally shoot a brick, but typically at least a couple hundred rounds. Then it's on to the CF gun. Or when I have my Kahr PM-9, which is too light for comfortable shooting, I'll alternate.

    I don't know how anyone can really learn to shoot using one of the various hand cannons that get talked about here. Learning recoil anticipation, flinching, empty wallet syndrome, I-am-ego, see-what-a-big-noise-I-can-make, ... I can see all that. But learning and honing one's shooting, no.
     
  13. simms65

    simms65 Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    A .22 always goes with me to the range, regardless of what else may or may not. :iagree:
     
  14. watchman

    watchman Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    In the hot months I carry a old model colt woodsman with barrel cut to one in
    as my edc very flat profile and 10 shots of stingers.
    Off hand I can put all 10 in a 50 cent size group from a draw.
    at 20 steps. I carry it in my right rear pocket in a homemade holster
    of corse I practice this 2 to 3 times a week.
     
  15. islandson

    islandson Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's to bad that most of the ranges nowadays cannot allow minors, the kids, in so that they can learn under expert instruction.
    Most jurisdictions do not allow for firearm instruction and the only way we can teach the kids is if we live out (way out) in the country. How can junior leagues be brought back, with all the interference from the lawyers and the anti-gunners? The times, they have changed, much for the worse.
    I still have my 10/22, every once in while, i'll dig thru the box and grab a couple of boxes and head for the hills. That and a couple of empty 2 liter soda bottles. Good times. ;)
     
  16. JB in SC

    JB in SC Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    254
    A TPH is an elegant plinker & tag a long.

    My son now has possession :)
     
  17. Dirty Bob

    Dirty Bob Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    15
    Absolutely true! It also could arguably make an excellent trail pistol for a lot of us.

    Nice pic, too!

    Dirty Bob
     
  18. JB in SC

    JB in SC Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    254
    Thanks, the TPH is a little more discrete than a Kit Gun.
     
  19. acropolis5

    acropolis5 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    116
    Its too bad they stopped making the TPH. Do you know of a source for factory magazines?
     
  20. JB in SC

    JB in SC Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2007
    Messages:
    433
    Likes Received:
    254
    There's a guy over at the Walther forum that has some of the nickel plated mags for the American Stainless TPH.

    The German ones run about $80 or so from Earl's.

    The US versions command substantial prices, as much as $100 each. I was lucky enough to get three with mine when I bought it early this year. The plastic floorplate is a part that will break occasionally, but .25 ACP mags can be had for as little as $10.00 each (cheaper than replacing the floorplate with the German version @ $20).