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What do I need for my trauma kit?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by KB3UBW, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    I recently earned my Wilderness and Remote first aid certifacation, and I'm in the process of putting together a trauma kit for my EDC/woods bag (in one of these) so I was wondering two things:
    1: Should I just buy the kit that comes with the pouch and add to/ modify the componets
    OR
    2: Should I buy just the pouch and build up the contents from scratch?

    Also what do you guys think that every trauma kit should have, and what do you have in yours?

    Thanks for all of your help,
    KB3UBW
     
  2. VinnyP
    • In Omnia Paratus

    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    I think their contents look good, obviously add a Tourniquet and I would add some shears. I would get the components separately because TBH you are paying well over what they cost there. Is it just for trauma or would you want it as an FAK as well?
     
  3. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    I was already planning on picking up some shears, a tourniquet, and a sam splint no matter which path I went. I want it to perform as a FAK as well, although I already have a small FAK for minor cut and scrapes, in addition to a CPR mask and gloves.
     
  4. smellypaddler

    smellypaddler Loaded Pockets

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    I think that you need to really think about when you are going to use this kit and what sort of injury/illness is likely. If you are wilderness/remote do you want a "trauma" kit to deal with acutely ill patients that have suffered major trauma? or more likely are you going to need to stabilise and manage an acute medical condition or injury for a number of hours/days?

    Whatever you decide I think that buying the components separately allows you a little more flexibility when kitting out your bag.

    I think every trauma kit should have some form of space/foil blanket as cold trauma patients don't do well. Also shears to expose the patient, something to manage airway and something to manage bleeding. If you have the knowledge to use it then some form of observations kit - Stethoscope and BP cuff. If you don't have the ability to use these tools then you'll have to rely on a pulses and the appearance of your patient.

    No radial pulse = systolic BP <80mmHg
     
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  5. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    Currently I am not planning for a long term care situation, as the majority of the time I will be in a environment where the pros will be <1/2 hour away, and once I have my main kit I will put together a supplementary kit for long term scenarios that I can add to my bag before backcountry trips.

    Also should I carry a tourniquet or a Israeli or both?
     
  6. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    QuickClot. In bandage form.
     
  7. HappyPuppy

    HappyPuppy Loaded Pockets

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    In order of importance in mine
    Tourniquet
    Maxi-pad
    Triangle bandage ( for splints)
    Gauze 4 x 4
    Quick clot ( I don't use the Pre treated type , personal preference)
    Cling ( a self adhesive wrap)
    Duct tape from my general tools
    Space type blanket
    Tools

    Suture kit
    hemostats (2)
    Trauma scissors
    Tweezers

    Drugs

    Betadine swabs and in a 10 ml plastic bottle
    Aspirin - wonder drug for heart attacks
    Benadryl
    Pepto bismol - works as an anti diarrhea drug and can be used for poison ivy etc
    Tri antibiotic ointment
    Epistick - I'm very allergic to shellfish

    All this finds in a very surprisingly small pack









    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
     
  8. Guardian Angel 1983

    Guardian Angel 1983 Loaded Pockets

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    Trauma kits that you get in stores are just glorified FAKs IMHO. I always prefer building my own. Just like with a bug out bag, the only one who knows what's best for you is you.

    In mine I include:
    C.A.T (combat application tourniquet)
    Large gauze (5)
    Telfa bandages (5)
    Medical tape
    Large dressings (or maxi pads do the same thing)
    Mylar blankets (2[prevent shock[)
    Tampons (3[for puntcure wounds[)
    Shears
    Razor blade
    Iodine
    Super glue/skin stapler/sutures
     
  9. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    I know, but the one in the link looks pretty decent, although it is a little over priced.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    Anybody else?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  11. Pittcom

    Pittcom Empty Pockets

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    That's a great kit you referenced although it's way over priced. Keep in mind that's a blow out kit and geared towards GSW's although the contents easily cover other traumas that cross over into the big 3.
    A blow out kit is designed to treat the three leading preventable causes of death in the field. These are Extremity Hemorrhage, 60%; Tension Pneumothorax, 33% and Airway Obstruction, 6%. I'm a director at a tactical school and here's the kit contents that we promote to our students:
    • SOF-T Tourniquet (1)
      • QuikClot Combat Gauze (1)
      • HALO Chest Seal (2)
      • MojoDart Decompression Needle Tension Pneumothorax 14 gauge 3.25″ (1)
      • Nasopharyngeal Airway (NPA) Adj. 28fr (1)
      • Pressure Dressing (1 – 4″)
      • Elastic Bandage (1 – 2″)
      • Z-Fold Dressing (1)
      • EMT Trauma Shears
      • Nitrile Gloves (1 Pair)
      • Lubricating Jelly (1)
    Throw it all in a AR-15 mag pouch and save half of that money for other gear. I'm not dissing that particular kit you referenced it's way Tacticool and well laid out in design, it's a matter of what you're willing to pay for the convience of not having to put it together yourself. Also it's dead weight if you don't have the training to use the contents. But there's also the peace of mind of knowing "if you have it on you, maybe someone you're with will have the training to save you with your own gear".
     
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  12. Eyego

    Eyego Loaded Pockets

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    def quickclot sport and some neosporin plus hydrogen peroxide plus ibuprofen plus aspirin plus bandages plus paracord to tourniquet
     
  13. VinnyP
    • In Omnia Paratus

    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    Quikclot sport is Quikclot lite not designed for serious bleeding and hasn't done very well in tests. Paracord is very bad as a tourniquet and Hydrogen Peroxide is an equally bad thing for a First Aid Kit.
     
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  14. MedicInTraining
    • In Omnia Paratus

    MedicInTraining Loaded Pockets

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    Amen to that Vinny.

    Quickclot should be used as a last resort in general. If you can't stop the bleeding with direct pressure and gauze then consider it but it is not a first line of treatment for bleeding because it means more intense wound debridement once you get to hospital. And get the proper QuickClot not the Sports version.

    Anyone who suggests paracord for a tourniquet either has no medical knowledge whatsoever or is someone who thinks they're Macgyver and is going to wing it. Sure if you are running naked through the woods with only a spool of paracord and you happen to amputate your leg then it's better than nothing but I would never ever ever ever include it in a FAK with the intention for it to be used as a TQ. If you don't want to shell out the money (or don't have the training) for a specific TQ such as the CAT then learn how to make one out of a triangular bandage and stick/pen/shears for a torque wrench.

    Hydrogen Peroxide is outdated and can lead to more complications further down the track. If it's the only thing you've got on hand and you've got maggots in your wound then maybe use it but if you're compiling a kit from scratch I'd be putting several small things (we use 10ml and 30ml on our trucks) of Sodium Chloride and several Chlorhexidine for irrigation rather than Hydrogen Peroxide. Either that or a small flask of vodka of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    These however are just my opinions and are based on readings performed over the last three years of nursing/medic study at university and are not professional advice in any way shape or form. It's your kit- I would definitely make it myself rather than buying a premade one because then you have greater control over what you put it and you can tailor it to your needs and skill level.
     
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  15. smellypaddler

    smellypaddler Loaded Pockets

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  16. nemoaz

    nemoaz Loaded Pockets

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    Suture kit? Just because Rambo did it doesn't mean you should. (This isn't directed at a particular poster because I know it's fashionable these days to claim you carry a suture kit and prepared to stitch up the next wounds you see.)

    What training do you have to use sutures? What do carry as an antiseptic and antibiotics? Do you have training to do proper wound prep? (Hint: it's not just pouring some sterile water on it.) Do you know what areas to suture and what areas not to suture? Do you know when to use multiple levels of sutures? Know the correct type of suture to use in different situations? Know how or when to debride? Do you carry drains also? Know when to use them? Know how to treat a abscess?

    You know there is a reason that doctors or advanced care corpsmen/medics do all these things, right? And even good physicians or other providers who had a sterile field and used supplemental antibiotics have a pretty high number of problems associated with sutures (thus why they tell you to come back in three days for follow up).

    If they answer is no to all these, you really have no business carrying a suture kit.

    Put down the sutures, Johnny Rambo.
     
  17. jp2515

    jp2515 Loaded Pockets

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    I suggest building your own. Sometimes you can find the right stuff at great prices on EvilBay. Here's one I put together

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    A compact version, similar to the ITS pocket kit:

    [​IMG]
     
  18. KB3UBW

    KB3UBW Loaded Pockets

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    Might I ask what you have in there?

    So far I have:
    (1) Trauma shears
    (1) Hemostats
    (1) Small penlight
    (1) Small Pocket knife
    (2) Rolled Gauze
    (1) QuikClot
    (1) Israeli Bandage
    (1) Ace Bandage
    (2) Pairs of Latex gloves
    (3) 3X4 Non-Stick dressings
    (1) 9" SAM Splint (And a 36" one that goes in my hydration pocket for hikes and such)

    What should I add/subtract from that list?

    EDIT: I already plan to add a tourniquet, but what type should I get?
     
  19. jp2515

    jp2515 Loaded Pockets

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    Quikclot Combat Gauze
    H&H Primed Compressed Gauze
    SWAT-T Tourniquet
    4" Israeli Dressing
    Duct Tape
    Elastic Bandage

    The CAT or SOFF-T are quite popular

    I think you got the basic items. I would suggest swapping out the rolled gauze for compressed gauze (you get more and its packed flat). Also add some medical tape/duct tape.
     
  20. Medic715

    Medic715 Loaded Pockets

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    If you're looking to build a kit, I recommend some type of small backpack or a waist pack. Check out either Statpak or Meret. What you have is nice, but it's only effective if you have a solid way to carry it either via MOLLE or attaching it to another pack.

    As far as contents, here's what I think:
    • 4x4 bandages
    • 2x2 bandage
    • Tourniquet (My preference is the C-A-T by North American Rescue)
    • 2" and 1' Adhesive tape
    • CoFlex wrap bandages
    • ACE bandage
    • Quik Clot
    • Alcohol wipes
    • SAM Splint
    • Chemical Cold Pack
    • Triangle Bandages
    • Anti Inflammatory and Pain meds
    • A few pair of Nitrile Gloves
    • A good set of sharp trauma shears
    Good Luck!
     
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