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What do I do with this paracord stuff?

Discussion in 'Do-It-Yourself & Gear Modifications' started by cosine, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Stormdrane

    Stormdrane Loaded Pockets

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    I just bought a couple different sized ones off ebay. :)


    Perma Lok Jumbo 1193-02 (fits 550 paracord - melt the end, trim to a point and screws right in)

    Perma Lok 1193-01 (for smaller diameter cord)


    The Michaels craft store near me doesn't carry those particular threaded needles and the Hobby Lobby, I used to go to, closed a while back. :rolleyes:


    I added a 16L3B TH to my Trail Master sheath, using 38 feet of paracord with four passes. I used another 12 feet for the noose/coil knot(doubled) on the leg strap attachment on the sheath.

    [​IMG]
     
    JTPhoenix likes this.
  2. thag

    thag Loaded Pockets

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    I found Ashley Book of Knots at my local half price book store this weekend for $39! Sweet deal! All I need now is to order some colorful paracord to get this addiction going!

    :roof:
     
  3. mho1970

    mho1970 Loaded Pockets

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    Congrats on the great snag!!! I think I ended up paying around $65.00 + shipping for mine. I am slowly reading it page for page. and trying some of the knots as I go.
     
  4. dewildeman

    dewildeman Loaded Pockets

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    I had to jump on the 3Bx16L band wagon, put this on a "baby bottle" from the group buy, didn't like it enough to put on the cane.

    [img width=640 height=481]http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii204/dewildeman/EDC/HPIM2808.jpg[/img]

    I said in another thread that I wanted to attempt a long turkshead 20+ leads, here's a WIP. 5Bx41L turkshead. I got some guidance from Charles Spencer's Knots, Splices & Fancy Work. I used some pipe insulation and applique pins. Had to backtrack a couple of times but it wasn't as difficult as I thought. I'll post the pic when I'm done.
    [img width=640 height=481]http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii204/dewildeman/EDC/HPIM2809.jpg[/img]
     
  5. InspektorGadget

    InspektorGadget Loaded Pockets

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    Hiya dewildman, it came out nicely. 2 questions...What type of cord are you using and where did you purchase it?

    Thanks,

    Rich
     
  6. dewildeman

    dewildeman Loaded Pockets

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    It's venetian blind cord and I get it from http://www.rwrope.com/. They custom dye the cord in spools of 10,000 ft and sell the run overs, short pieces, etc. It comes in different sizes and colors in spools of about 100 ft called "Handy Hundreds". They run about $3 a spool. Call them up for a quote, their stock is always changing, you can't just call up and say "I want 5 spools of red in 1.8 mm". Ask for Bob Dollar, he's a member of the IGKT and will help you out (so will everyone else). :luck:
     
  7. dewildeman

    dewildeman Loaded Pockets

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    Here's the finished turkshead on the cane, 5Bx46L, I think. :laugh:

    [img width=640 height=481]http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii204/dewildeman/Knots/HPIM2824.jpg[/img]
     
  8. InspektorGadget

    InspektorGadget Loaded Pockets

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    Looks great! Thanks for the info.

    Rich
     
  9. peacefuljeffrey

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    That's just stunning! :eek: :bow:

    I've done a number of 16L 3B Turk's Heads, and for a while I had it memorized and could do it without looking at a book -- but if I had to do one today I'd have to go seek the pattern out of my Budworth book again. That is the most ambitious one I've ever tried. I guess I shy away from them because it causes me significant discomfort sometimes to try to learn a new, complicated knot, and face the frustration of failing to tie it successfully the first bunch of times. Plus, I've seen some of the charts and stuff that are offered as guides for big Turk's Heads, and they never seem to be explained to me in a way that makes them able to be used.

    I simply haven't done any Turk's Heads that can't be tied just by looking at what you're doing. The minute they start to require serious planning, I get spooked. :bolt:
     
  10. dewildeman

    dewildeman Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for the compliment. You guys kicked me in the pants to try the 16Lx3B. Once I did it I realized that I should be able to tie a longer one by increasing the number of turns around a mandrel and use the same over-under pattern but with 2 more steps. I didn't try it because I wanted 4 bights instead of 3. I pulled out my Spencer book and checked out some instructions on narrow TKs. I started by wrapping a cord around the form/mandrel 5 times (instead of 3 like the 16lx3b) to make it longer. On the return started by going over the cord and do a alternate under-over pattern. Repeat this for every bight you want, I wanted a 4 bight so I repeated this 4 times by going parallel to the cord that preceded it and alternating the U-O pattern, if the cord parallel next it went under, this cord went over, some times you may have to go under twice at the ends, but it will correct itself later. The first time I tried it by tying it in hand and quickly had a mess. After I had the 4 bights done I checked by O-U pattern and found a couple of boo-boos and fixed them.

    I found I that I learn a lot from my mistakes and that some things that don't make any sense in the book suddenly make sense when I'm tying it. And to take things slow. Every once and a while I'll get out a book that had something in it that at the time looked way over my head and go over it again. By doing the 16lx3b I thought I was ready to tackle this one.

    Now I'm working on a spherical knot, basically a TK tied around a round ball. :D
     
  11. peacefuljeffrey

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    If you want to do spherical knots, I recommend checking out the designs in Geoffrey Budworth's "The Complete Book of Decorative Knots".

    He describes some that he names with the names of planets. I haven't done them, myself (they are quite complex and while I could probably do them, I've never felt like tackling the project) but they look really cool.
     
  12. bushidomosquito

    bushidomosquito Removed from forum.

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    What do you do with the inner strands? I'm saving all mine in a big bag so I can use them to make a winter white ghilie suit. There is almost always snow on the groung when and where I hunt and this stuff shimmers a bit like real snow. White fabric is kind of dull and stands out. I dropped a big wad of inner strands in the snow last winter and they just disappered. I have so much now that I may have to dye some for other times of the year or other hunting locations. I also save short pieces of the outer sheath since I use mostly military colors I figure I can comb them out into a frizz for the same purpose.

    Save them at any rate. There have been more than a few times that it has been just the perfect kind of string for something.
     
  13. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    Man! That's the first time I've seen somebody find a good use for the inner strands.

    It seems a waste to throw them out, but I haven't found a good use for them.
     
  14. bushidomosquito

    bushidomosquito Removed from forum.

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    Little 6" lengths of brown and olive green outer sheath tied around my rifle barrel and frayed out makes it vanish. It only takes about 7 or 8 pieces and a few leaves stuck in it to break up the outline and you don't need that ugly gun camo paint job. I laid it down and walked about 200 yards away to dress a deer and when I came back it took me about an hour to find it. :(

    For the earthtone ghilie suit I just use a pair of old mossy oak coveralls with little holes poked in them and the paracord sheath scraps tied through and a drop of super glue to keep the knots tied. If you fray those ends out till it's all big and puffy and roll around in some leaves you will become invisible. I had a squirell climb right over me! For the white suit I think I'll use some of those tyvek painters coveralls with the inner strands since tyvek has that snow sheen to it as well.
     
  15. Nephiel

    Nephiel Loaded Pockets

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    In case of emergency it can be used as fishing line / sewing thread / dental thread, I guess.
     
  16. mikel81

    mikel81 Loaded Pockets

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    My dad owned an insulation business long ago and he had boxes of those.  (I wish he still did)  They worked great for paintball in the woods, we used to spraypaint lines on them to break up the white. Wish I had known about paracord guts. lol
     
  17. peacefuljeffrey

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    The long-awaited five-strand warp SLING instructions

    Hi folks,
    Sorry this took me so long to get around to doing.

    When Stormdrane graciously posted his instructions for how to make a paracord sling, I set to work immediately on making one... then a few.

    And while I loved it, I felt the need to make the pouch wider, so as to retain the projectile more securely. I wanted it to have the ability to be more cup-like.

    This is the result of my experimentation, and since I have had at least one request to post a "tutorial," here is my go at doing that. Instructions for each photo will be at the top of the photo.

    Good luck! :thumbsup:



    Begin with a length of (ungutted) paracord. I am sorry I don't have an exact length to tell you, since I didn't keep track, but it ought to be about 8-9 feet to be on the safe side. (You can always cut it down when you are finishing it.)
    Fold the cord like this. You will be creating five lengths that are doubled next to each other.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02341.jpg[/img]



    This project is done with full symmetry through the center point, so do the exact same thing to both sides. (You can do this one side at a time, of course, but keep track of the strands.) Take the bight that lies next to each working end, and lay it on top of the bight next to it.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02343.jpg[/img]



    "Lasso" around the two bights with the working end. (Make your work look exactly like you see here.)
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02344.jpg[/img]



    Tuck the working end (they are short in this example but will be about 4 feet long on a live specimen) over itself and then down through both of the bights.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02345.jpg[/img]



    Here is what it will look like with both sides of the pouch done.
    IMPORTANT: Take careful note of that strand that is running diagonally from low-left to high-right. That is your middle-most single strand. When you flip the pouch over to begin weaving the next step, make sure it is the center strand! From there it should be easy to see which are the outer-most and second-outer-most strands.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02346.jpg[/img]



    FLIP THE PIECE OVER. A moment ago, you were looking at the back of the pouch. You will now be looking at the front of the pouch. You can tell one from the other because when looking into the pouch, you will see the working ends coming out of the bights "toward" you.

    This section should be about 4.0" - 4.5" long. You will need to make the corresponding lengths of the strands in the pouch approximately equal in length, but you should be finding that the center-most three will "pouch down" to make a sort of cupping. Play with it. But at this point when I make one, the pouch already seems to "know" which side is the cup.
    Tighten up the "lassos" that wrap the bights.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02348.jpg[/img]



    Now it is time to start weaving a second strand in. Wasn't I nice to use a highly contrasting cord color? ;D
    You might as well just start from the left side and poke a short length (about 4") through as you see here (exactly as you see here) so that sticking out to the right is the part that will be the end (as you will see in the next picture). The left side is your working end which will be woven across the pouch.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02351.jpg[/img]



    Now you can see the right-to-left-to-right weave of the crossing (orange) strand. Continue weaving O-U-O-U-O-U... all the way to the other side of the pouch.
    IMPORTANT NOTE: It is not necessary, nor will it likely even be possible, to make these strands snug up against each other and look like the arrangement in a Ladder Rack Knot. As long as the overall shape of this pouch is more or less almond-shaped, it will be fine. Do try to keep it even, of course, but small gaps are not only not undesirable, they are more-or-less unavoidable.
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02352.jpg[/img]



    This is the pouch when the weaving has been completed and tightened-up and evened-up. Yes, you will have to do a little "working" of the orange cord. Use your fingers to push or pull the horizontal strands along their green warp strands if they seem to be bunched toward one end or the other. Fit as many crosswise orange strands as you can, to minimize gaps in the pouch. It may help to have a titanium "icepick" marlinspike from LCranston, like I do. :-X
    [img width=479 height=640]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02353.jpg[/img]



    Flip the work over and look at the back side of the pouch. Single out the specific strand that I have picked up with the titanium spike in the picture. Tuck the short end of the orange cord under that strand, and the one beyond it. That should be good enough to keep it plenty secure, although you can always go for a third strand. (Remember, you will do this for each symmetrical end of the pouch, and it will look exactly the same as the first side or you did something wrong.)
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02354.jpg[/img]



    Clip the end and melt it according to your preference for finishing paracord ends. Tie your preferred loop in one end of the green cord, and a stopper knot at the other end, and you have yourself a sling!
    O0
    For ammunition, go to Walmart and check in the home decor area for "decorator accents" and such. I bought a bag of glass droplets that are close to an inch in diameter. They are shaped like bon-bons, or Cella's cherry candies, and nestle perfectly into the pouch. Yes, I would prefer polished steel balls for their additional mass, but they are not cheap!
    [img width=640 height=480]http://i224.photobucket.com/albums/dd269/ornithoid/Knotwork/halfDSC02355.jpg[/img]


    Please use care, intelligence and maturity when using your sling. I of course have no control of, and bear no responsibility for, what you do with your sling. I am not a practiced expert, myself. I looked up some YouTube videos of people using slings (and slinging.org is a valuable resource) to learn something about how to use the sling.

    Be safe, and have fun! :D
     
  18. Stormdrane

    Stormdrane Loaded Pockets

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    Great tutorial! Thanks for sharing. O0
     
  19. Button

    Button Empty Pockets

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    Thanks for sharing this info O0
     
  20. peacefuljeffrey

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    You're welcome.

    I'm gonna thank Stormdrane once again ("Thank you, Stormdrane!") for first teaching me the three-strand version. That was pivotal and it's what I was playing around with when I went hunting a wider pouch. Actually, the 3-strand one works, of course. It even looks better. But I felt I needed more of a formed cup-like pouch so I sought the solution in a design that used more strands.

    The funny thing is, these things are EASY to make. Seriously! Far harder to use them well than to make them, that's for sure (but I haven't put in a lot of practice, yet).

    Enjoy, guys!

    -PJ