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Wearing watch in dominant hand

Discussion in 'Watches' started by Darth_Revan, May 7, 2020.

  1. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Loaded Pockets

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    Hello everyone. I wear my watch in my right wrist and I'm right handed, but I always saw people saying that the right hand to wear it is the left wrist. Looking more into it, I found that the convention is to wear it in your non dominant hand (left for righties and right for lefties).

    Recently, I tried using it in my left wrist. I feel a little bit more comfrotable in my right wrist, maybe because of all those years wearing that way, but I could wear it in any side without being uncomfortable.
    So, I was looking for logical reasons to choose a wrist to wear and the majority wasn't very convincent.

    The reason I found to use it in my left hand was that it is the social convention and I feel a bit weird/different from the watch lovers standards. I do not bump the watch using it in my right hand anymore than I bumped using it in my left. I write (seldom nowadays) and use the mouse with my right hand, but I don't feel the watch stands in the way.

    The reasons I found to use it in my right wrist was that my right wrist/forearm is slightly larger bigger than my left, but only by some milimeters, so that doesn't make much difference (my watch is kinda big and both my wrists are skinny :/ ). But I have the impression that the watch is shown more, both to me and other people (am I the only one here that often gets himself admiring the watch in the midle of the day?), so that's a good thing. Also, I'm single, but when I get married, I feel that using the watch and wedding ring on the same hand might be too much, don't know yet though.

    Yes, I tend to overthink things a lot. I would like to know your opinions about that. Do you guys have any reason to choose the wrist you wear and what you think about the dominant hand thing?

    Also, I heard people here, like me, love to see watch pictures, so here they are:

    Right hand
    [​IMG]

    Left hand
    [​IMG]

    I love this watch and I use it everyday, everywhere, all the time. It's a quartz, so I don't think I should worry about using it in hard activities (like hammering). And It doesn't have a crown, so I don't have to adjust it.

    Thougths?
     
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  2. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    The convention of wearing a watch on your weak-side wrist goes back to the day when you had to wind them periodically. Wearing it there facilitated daily winding, since the strong side hand has better small motor skills and the stem to wind it with would then be more readily accessible.
     
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  3. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    I'm sure there are much truth to that, but I find it immensely more practical to remove my manuals from my arm for winding.

    To the OP:
    when I got my first watch (the first I can remember) in elementary school, it was a digital Casio. Quite robust, but this was before G-shock was a thing. Every other kid that had a watch wore it on their left (non-dominat) wrist, but I just liked how it felt to wear it on my right hand. This became a habit, and even though I realized the right hand wear banged up my watches substantially more than a left hand wear would, it just felt wrong when I tried to switch side.
    Enter the mobile era, and I stopped wearing wrist watches for quite a few years. Then, around 2008 I got into the habit again, but after that long break, left wrist felt just as natural as the right, so I switched for practical reasons. Today it feels just about as weird if I try to wear my watch on my right hand wrist.
     
  4. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    Yes, so do I FWIW. Setting a watch while wearing it on your wrist is tedious. I had a work acquaintance who was left-handed but always wore his watch on his left wrist. He maintained it was more practical, since they were, in effect, designed to be worn that way. Generally, though, my observation has been most people prefer wearing them on their weak-hand side. As a guitar player (right hander), I prefer to wear it on my left wrist, so it doesn't scratch the guitar top (I remove my wedding ring to prevent scratching the neck & compressing the nerve in my ring finger). I suspect most people don't put much thought into the process & just follow convention.
     
  5. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    The original, practical reasoning was to reduce the probable physical damage to the watch itself.

    I often wear a watch with a much smaller fitness band on my dominant wrist. The fitness band gets beaten up constantly.

    Most early 20th century manuals had at least a 24 hour power reserve and were normally wound once per day.

    Sent from my LG-V520 using Tapatalk
     
  6. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    Well, there's no real data to back up the physical damage citation. Interestingly, this was also discussed on WatchUSeeK: https://forums.watchuseek.com/f2/why-wrist-watches-worn-left-when-most-people-right-handed-422008.html

    Having grown up using manual winders, I remember being told by "adults" that I needed to wear in on my left wrist so I could fasten it easily & wind it more easily...only one of those constraints still applies. There are other theories put forth in the linked discussion, however.
     
  7. Bad Company

    Bad Company Loaded Pockets

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    I say do what you like.
    Go against the norms.
    In the end, it's about you.
     
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  8. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Loaded Pockets

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    I think that if you wore the watch for more than a week it would stop feeling weird, no need for all those years.
    Why did you chose to use it in your left wrist when you returned using it?
    And did you really bumped less like you expected, or was like the right hand? I didn't feel that bumping difference between hands, maybe i should try more on the left.

    About the winding, I use a quartz, and i believe most people remove the watch to wind.
     
  9. Reidar Chr. L. Guttormsen

    Reidar Chr. L. Guttormsen Loaded Pockets

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    Wear a pocket watch and your problems are over ;-)[​IMG]

    from my S-A-M-S-U-N-G S9+ via T-A-P-A-T-A-L-K
     
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  10. aicolainen

    aicolainen Loaded Pockets

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    That's probably true, but I didn't have to, so there was no motivation to even try :)

    Yes, I believe my watch took more of a beating on my right arm, and that's why I chose to go left this time around. Can't prove that with statistics though :)
    When I went back to wearing a watch, I was a field engineer in the offshore and marine industry. I often had to work in tight spaces, and my arms and hands took most of the beating. My left arm wasn't safe in any way, but my right hand, with the required fine motor skills usually had to go the furthest, deepest and longest into the unknown :)
    Back then I really needed a watch. I often had to leave my phone behind, so I had to relay on my watch for timekeeping.
    Today I have an office job, and mostly choose to wear a watch for convenience and to avoid the habit of looking at my phone all the time. I don't think there really would be any practical difference to which arm I wear it on today, but I'm already in the habit of wearing it on my left arm and that works just fine.
     
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  11. BklynBoy

    BklynBoy Loaded Pockets

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    I am a lefty and wear my watch on my left hand. With crowns on the right hand side of the watch, I often found that the back of my hand became irritated with large crowns, so for chunkier dive and field watches I generally buy derecho watches with the crown on the left hand side of the watch or else a crown offset higher or lower than the 3PM position.

    To each his own.
     
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  12. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Loaded Pockets

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    Intersting link. THe majority of reasons posted there were covered in my OP, though, and they don't affect me much. In both sides, lol.
    A user there posted something like adding weight in your dominant hand makes funcions less easier. My watch is kinda new, got in almost in march, and it's a lot heavier than my previous one. I think that's a point to ponder.

    Since you wear it in your dominant hand, do you feel it as a hindrance to your daily activities? And do you worry when doing heavy tasks, like hammering, or any abrupt movement?

    Also, anyone else here wear it on dominant hand?
     
  13. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah. I'm too old to form a new habit. The only one that tripped as a serious thing was if you write a lot it hampers that/might gouge paper, but I think it's mostly custom/learned behavior.
     
  14. Reidar Chr. L. Guttormsen

    Reidar Chr. L. Guttormsen Loaded Pockets

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    Well for all you wristwatch wearers. Do you wear the watch with the dial on the outside or the inside of your wrist? Some people think it more efficient as you would have to turn the hand less to see the watch[​IMG]

    from my S-A-M-S-U-N-G S9+ via T-A-P-A-T-A-L-K
     
  15. Adam Ng

    Adam Ng Loaded Pockets

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    Right handed and watch on the right wrist here. Since my first watch at 12. Hate having the crown digging in the back of my hand the few time I wore watch on my left.
     
  16. Froley

    Froley Loaded Pockets

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    One of the reasons for wearing your watch on your non-dominate wrist is so that the watchband/strap will not become hung up on your
    gear while reaching for or working your weapons/equipment....
     
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  17. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    Since the majority of us have our hands on a keyboard most of the day, try this--glance at your watch while typing--oh wait..you can't without pronating your arm if you wear it underneath your wrist. The reason so few people do it is that's an easier and more natural arm movement to glance at it from the top of your wrist. The rest are trying to reinvent the wheel or adhere to some weird fashion trend. It also gets in the way of anything you're carrying and is more vulnerable to scratching.
     
  18. Darth_Revan

    Darth_Revan Loaded Pockets

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    Yes, and on top of that you lose the style benefit of using a nice, beautiful watch. If you care for that, of course.
     
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  19. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I once read a article about a Casio DW290; it caught my eye when I realized that Special Prosecutor Mueller wore one with his suit. Turned out he was in Special Forces in Vietnam; started wearing that model watch at that time. At any rate, he did and seems like still does wear it on the inside of his wrist. Something about in a combat situation, when needing to use a firearm or binoculars, the crystal was less likely to reflect sunlight and thereby to reveal one's position to say a sniper...

    I thought it was interesting. But no, I have not taken up wearing the watch on the inside of my wrist. Just not comfortable to me...

    Am Yisrael Chai!

    Moshe ben David
     
  20. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    The Casio DW290 was the wristwatch Tom Cruise wore in "Mission Impossible". Wearing the watch facing inward began in WWI for the reason stated. Also, many of the earlier military watches has radium marked dials, so would be visible at night if facing outward. WWI also gave us the 3 on a match rule---if you lit 3 cigarettes off one match, one of the 3 would die (presumably from sniper fire, since the amount of time would allow them to sight, aim, and fire).
     
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