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Very small belt-mounted Immediate Trauma Kit?

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by RogerStenning, Jun 17, 2018.

  1. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Background:

    As some of you have noticed, I'm based in England (the UK), I have a reasonable pack-mounted trauma kit that I carry when at work, and in the back of my car.

    However, I also work with three other guys in a voluntary team to do with mid-to-large-size public events, where my current TFAK is going to be at least five, often more, minutes away by foot (you can't carry a backpack at many of these events, and we're supposed to be reasonably low-key), so I and the rest of my team are looking for a TFAK of small essential items only, with a low training requirement (for them, that is, as I've had the training already!).

    These TFAK elements will be mounted in as small a belt-carried pouch as possible, since the kit we already carry takes up a bit of space on our belts under our blazers already - other standard belt kit includes defensive spray, torch (flashlight), two-way radio, handcuffs, and search gloves; this doesn't include what we have to carry in the blazers, such as notebook, pen, seat belt cutter/glass breaker, etc.

    So, I think I've got the listing nailed down:
    • Standard small first field dressing (FFD) (NOT Israeli pattern)
    • Vented Chest Seal pack (pair of seals per pack)
    • SOFTT tourniquet
    • Triangular Bandage
    Rationalisations:

    The belt-mounted STK (Small Trauma Kit) will be an interim solution to help until a more comprehensive set of kit is available, or until professional medical help arrives on-scene. The idea is to preserve life, not fix it, in the interim.

    • The basic First Field Dressing is not going to be the new form of Israeli combat dressing; this is your old fashioned 'absorbent pad on a ribbon' kind of thing, much like the British FFD of old, or the old style US "dressing, first aid, field, camouflaged". New commercial version of this exist, so that's an easy add.
    • The Vented chest seals are available, but most are fairly big - the smaller the better is the key here, so ideas on this would be welcome.
    • The SOFTT tourniquet is small, easily deployed, and available (I've got on myself), so that's what we'll look at here.
    • The triangular bandage is for the more common public event injury - broken bones, sprains, and dislocations, where immobilising the affected limb is the key, until the casualty can be moved to a more suitable treatment location.

    A pouch for this should be no more than five or six inches long, two to three inches tall, and absolutely no deeper than one and a half inches when packed (low profile, remember?).

    Problem:

    There does not appear to be a cheap (the other guys are also volunteers, remember, and don't have a lot of money to throw at something like this) pre-made STK of the nature described above, which I find rather surprising. So, acquiring the components four of these kits is not that much of a problem; what IS a problem is the pouch. It has to be small, easily removed from the belt to allow for deployment, and able to maintain retention ON the belt when not needed.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    Just curious what kind of injuries you'll be treating and what kind of environment you're working in?

    I have a Prometheus Medical, Russell Chest Seal, which packs down small enough to fit in my TFAK. I have no idea of the cost (work buys them) but the size is good.

    Can I ask why you are going with an FFD and not a more modern dressing?
     
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  3. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Projected casualties types for events we'll be attending are primarily crushes, dislocations and breaks, maybe a stab/pneumothorax, where the priority is to either plug, patch, or immobilise the injury prior to professional medical assistance arriving.

    What're the dimensions of the Prometheus seal?

    We're going with FFD rather than modern combat dressings due to space restrictions. Modern combat trauma dressings (eg Israeli dressings) are way bigger (fatter) than the equivalent FFDs in their packed state.
     
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  4. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    This is the size, but it can be folded at the top and the bottom and it still lays pretty flat.

    I take your point on the FFD, I like to carry one when I can, but I still prefer the Modular Bandage type dressings for their ease of use. You have some unique size requirements though it seems.


    [​IMG]

    Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk
     
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  5. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Yeah, the size requirement is due to needing to fit a fair amount of kit on the trousers belt. As a result, the STK has to be smaller than you'd normally have. The maximum length is going to be dictated by the SOFTT tourniquet windlass, but everything else should either be smaller, or foldable to size. Ideally, it will pack into a small pouch that, when you're seated in a car driving seat acts like a form of lumbar pad, so as not to distract from the driving, and when out of the car, doesn't detract from the fall of the blazer, to retain the low key unobtrusive appearance we have to maintain. Not an easy nut to crack, I agree.
     
  6. ProjeKtWEREWOLF

    ProjeKtWEREWOLF Loaded Pockets

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    Excuse the dumb question, but why do you need to be so undercover about it all?
     
  7. Ren

    Ren Loaded Pockets

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  8. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    Just read the OP again, it seems odd to me. Handcuffs and "self defence spray", in England? That seems a little odd.

    BTW, I was on the Royal Rota yesterday and the Queen's PPO's carry a very small FAK with a TQ, homeostatic dressing and a izzy....
     
  9. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Hardly undercover, but low profile. There's a not unsubtle difference :)

    Mainly, it's to meet local requirements on how we present ourselves while we're doing what we've been asked to do (safety, med, and Multi-Purpose assistance).
     
  10. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Defensive spray, not self defence. It's used in the UK only, and is a defensive marker spray, leaves a uv trace on an aggressor. Can't use anything more serious here, but we can when abroad.

    OK on DPG kit. I'll have a look into that, thanks.
     
  11. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for your reply. I thought that might be the case with the spray. I think you will still need to be careful with the cuffs (and carry a copy of your training certificate and proof of insurance for their use).

    It's not DPG, I think it's called RaSP Command now. I am doing it again next week and will try and get a photo of the med stuff.

    What kind of events are you covering Roger?
     
  12. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Heh. The more things change, etc ;-) Look forward to seeing the photos of that med kit :)

    We're a team of ex-RMP; It's mai ly public safety event coverage, H&S, med, and similar, both here and abroad. Abroad, we have a little more latitude in how we can do things, of course. OK on certs and in, yeah, have to re-up on all of those again this year,along with the med cover certs etc. No job's ever done, until the paperwork is completed (shuts the toilet door)... ;-)
     
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  13. HardToHandle

    HardToHandle Loaded Pockets

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    I roll my own kits mostly using vacuum packing, but pre-made solution is...
    https://www.blueforcegear.com/www.blueforcegear.com/micro-trauma-kit

    The Blue Force solution is very elegant, but not cheap.
     
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  14. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Hmm. Size and attachment are both good. However, the glaring omission on supplied med kit in this would be a tourniquet. That's a bit surprising, all things considered :eek:
     
  15. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I get where you are coming from, I my self have been in several different roles as a EMS supervisor, safety officer, now working at a gov agency etc. at many large events (200+) in europe. The pattern of injury besides the regular medical emergencies like chest pain, hypoglycemia, respiratory distress, heat stroke can be various of penetrating trauma at larger events. stabbings with box cutter knives etc. as well as fractures and dislocations. seems to be quite common unfortunately. I highly commend your dedication to carry an IFAK.
    Have you looked at the tasmanian tiger pouches?
    like tasmanian tiger pouch 3. I have been using their pouches for exactly the same as you are looking for for several years. they have been great and come in alot of sizes.
    [​IMG]
    They also have dedicated IFAK pouches. which are flat and quite low profile and is easily coverd by a reflective vest (which is what im using along with a dedicated TQ pouch with a CAT g7.
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    OHO :bounce: I've got one of their larger pouches for an extended edc tool kit, but didn't know they did a TFAK as well. I'll look into that, thanks! :D

    (A couple of hours later...)

    OK, got home from work, and had a look. Interesting. Maybe a bit bit for the small of the back lumbar pad idea, but you gave me another thought. the four items don't necessarily have to be carried together in one pouch; the tourniquet could be carried in a pouch on it's own on the belt, with the other, less bulky items, carried in pockets elsewhere; the chest seals, for example, could be carried in one of the inside chest pockets of the blazer, the FFD in one pocket, the triangular bandage in another. HOwever, a problem arises when it's shirtsleeves order, with no jacket.

    Hmm.

    Never as simple as one first thinks, this kinda thing, is it? :giggle:
     
    Last edited by RogerStenning, Jun 19, 2018
    #16 RogerStenning, Jun 19, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2018
  17. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Loaded Pockets

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    Why not just buy it empty, then add what you feel necessary?
     
  18. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Apologies, a bit of a rant in response (been one of those days, sadly)...

    Not at 68 bucks for an empty pouch :eek: I can sometimes be a bit loose with my wallet, but my team mates, not so much. Hell, the darn thing's way out of budget range with even basic medkit supplies ($129), let alone advanced medkit supplies ($200) - and let's not then forget that this has to be shipped from the USA to the UK, which ain't cheap by any stretch of the imagination, especially when you then remember to add the UK importation fees and duties. :eek:

    Don't get me wrong: It's an excellent bit of design work, and the kit included (if you opt for it) is well selected. But, the cost. WOW, the cost. :frantic:

    Four items need to be in our STK (Small Trauma Kit). FFD, Tourniquet, chest seals, and a triangular bandage (no tracheal tubes or decompression needles, we're not paramedics or advanced first responders or whatnot). That's it. I may be trained in certain aspects of advanced life saving, but not my team mates, who have basic training only, and whose training costs come out of their own pockets (volunteers, remember, with full time jobs they have to tend to, and families to feed... and oh yeah, this is the UK, where we ain't paid [deleted] properly, compared to the US equivalent jobs, dammit), so the kit must be reasonably effective, affordable, mission-specific, capable of being used by basic life-saving trained ex-military people, and small in size, given the volume of kit already carried, and also remembering that we have to clamber in and out of vehicles to drive them, while carrying all of this clutter.

    I do appreciate the idea, but cost-wise, it's just a non-starter, sorry.

    I'm open to other ideas, mind, so keep 'em coming :)

    Again, sorry for the slightly rantish reply.
     
  19. Journo

    Journo Loaded Pockets

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    Just a few thoughts (bearing in mind this is actually something I do).

    You've said a few times that you are all volunteers. Is everyone trained in how to use the items they are carrying?

    Do you have insurance?

    If you are providing your services for free, why don't you see if the organisations who ask for you to attend these events would be willing to purchase a small number of medical goods.

    And finally, in addition to the list of items you have above, please add a Sharpie to all the kits so that you can write TQ time on people.
     
  20. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    As mentioned a few posts above, we're all former RMP (Royal Military Police). The Army does give some good training, and that's where the major training we had came from. Since then, we've taken civilian equivalent courses (HSE FA, SIA accredited courses etc) to keep those training levels current (and they ain't cheap, some of 'em). We are insured, also as mentioned earlier.

    Interesting thought re med supplies; hadn' t thought of that. I'll look into it, thanks.

    I actually have sharpies in my main bergan-mounted TFAK, as well as the car TFAK. Completely slipped my mind to include one for the STK! :oops: Good catch, thanks :D