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Useful EDC things for Safari in Africa

Discussion in 'Travel' started by Scrumbag, Sep 1, 2017.

  1. Scrumbag

    Scrumbag Loaded Pockets

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    Hi folks,


    Just did a 3 week (photo) safari to Southern Africa so thought I would share some of the gadgets I found useful


    1. Swiss tool – Knife, scissors and pliers useful (also worth having a bigger knife for incase – I recommend a Mora)
    2. Lighter – Zippo with a butane replacement part (great for lighting insect repellent
    3. Torch – Took a Fenix UC35 – USB rechargeable with a Solar powered USB power pack (more later)
    4. Camera – Take a good one. We took a Sony HX400 20MP 50x Zoom Bridge Camera – Very nice combo of optical zoom and Zeiss lense (USB Chargeable)
    5. Binos – Don’t need batteries and help you find game
    6. Alcohol gel – helps avoid D&V
    7. Solar USB battery pack – great for charging cameras, torches and phones as not all accom has power points. USB compatibility with devices helps immensely

    Solar pack – bought this and though might be a gimmick. Brilliant device. Ebay special but worked a treat


    What else to you guys take when going into the bush / mountains / outback?


    Scrummy

    [​IMG]
     
    #1 Scrumbag, Sep 1, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
  2. ChadHahn

    ChadHahn Loaded Pockets

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    I wish I would have brought my Filson Medium Field Bag with me. It seems like I was always leaving something behind either my bird book of binoculars or something. If I would have brought my field bag, I could have stuck everything in there and had it with me.

    Also I didn't bring my iPhone. I bought a cheap phone on Amazon and brought it with me. It had dual sims so I could use one to make text messages back home and one for local calls. I wish I would have brought my iPhone anyway. I could have used it's camera for quick shots and I could have used some of my apps like the star finder app.


    Chad
     
    #2 ChadHahn, Sep 3, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  3. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I have never gone on any sort of trip like this and really doubt I ever will. I just wonder though, wouldn't it also be sensible to have some sort of snake bit kit with appropriate antivenin ? I mean just based on what shows up on various shows on Nat Geo etc., it appears to a novice like myself that such would be prudent?

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  4. skukuza

    skukuza Loaded Pockets

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    Not a good idea to carry a kit as certainly you will probably end up doing yourself more harm.
    Adrenaline is a componant in these kits and can be fatal if used wrongly, also some kits are specific to the type of snake although polyvalient kits are available. In the event of a viper bite such as a Black Mamba or any of the Neurotoxic venom cobras massive doses of vennine need to be administered so the chance of having enough to start with may be in question.
    One of the best things to do is to follow protocol and wrap the bitten limb with a crepe bandage so as to restrict the blood capollaries and slow down the movement of venom . Try and ID the snake and move calmly to a place of help. A photo of the snake would be a great help to medical services.
    Bearing in mind the fact most snake bites that deliver toxins are somewhat slow to be of any fatal consequence it is better to follow the route of not treating yourself.
    Follow advise and read up on the area you intend to go to in Africa, stick to paths and walk with footwear on at night, even in campsites.
    Hope ths helps anyone in the future.
     
  5. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I totally understand and in fact had not considered the probability of needing massive doses which probably one would not be carrying...

    I also frankly was not thinking someone would self dose, but rather was thinking in terms of having the kit on hand so someone else (hopefully a guide or someone with some training but perhaps I'm being overly optimistic!) would administer the antivenin...

    Glad others on here are more knowledgeable than I!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
    skukuza likes this.
  6. skukuza

    skukuza Loaded Pockets

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    You are welcome Moshe.
     
  7. T Shrapnel-Carruthers

    T Shrapnel-Carruthers Loaded Pockets

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    Classic photographer tip: zip-lock bags, about 1 litre size. On arrival fill it with sand, dry soil, rice, lentils, whatever you can find. Put that in a second bag in case of spills/leaks. Now you have a bean bag to stabilise the camera on whatever surface presents itself.

    If no surface available then a string monopod will help. Instructions here.

    Lots of anti-diarrheals (never forgotten having to make a mid-night dash for the toilet in an unfenced campsite in Ngoro-Ngoro crater having already heard creatures prowling about).
     
    Moshe ben David likes this.
  8. MedusaOblongata

    MedusaOblongata Loaded Pockets

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    I'd definitely add extra food, water, and clothing, water purification systems, very sturdy boots, the biggest knife you can get away with, guns, a geographically appropriate first aid kit and study beforehand local poisonous critters and how to identify them and how to treat their bites/stings (even if snake antivenin is impractical, the Sawyer extractor gets good reviews), a standalone GPS unit (don't just rely on cellphone), sunscreen, a good hat, flashlights and other electronics that can take spare replaceable batteries in case batteries run out in the dark, headlamp, and backups of important gear (I'd rather hike with a 50 pound pack than run out of any of the above).
     
  9. DeepBlue

    DeepBlue Loaded Pockets

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    In many safari locations where you are flying in a 50lb pack takes you well over the baggage limit!

    Other than 3-4 changes of lightweight but strong clothing that can be washed in camp my personal list goes along the following lines:

    - Camera gear. In my case that’s about 10Kg with two DSLR bodies and pretty long lenses and ancillary bits like camera batteries, chargers and plug adapters (inc cigar lighter USB charger). Not to mention about 600Gb in XQD and SD memory cards. Flashgun.
    - Monopod, tabletop tripod, and empty beanbag
    - 2x large ‘ultrasil’ drybags for dust protection
    - Apple Macbook 12”, 1Tb SSD and cables. (Photo backup and review.)
    - Binoculars
    - Kindle and a load of e-books
    - Iphone with audio books & music
    - Earbuds.
    - USB power pack - will recharge camera batteries, kindle, Macbook - actually everything we take (except below) because we made sure they will all charge from 5V 2.4A
    - 2 times zebralight flashlights. 1 flood beam goes on a headband and 1 beam for hand. These use one CR123 each (my home gear too) so enough spare batteries (usually 4 min)
    - Modded Leatherman Skeletool, Leatherman bits & bit extender to fit all photo stuff. Victorinox Alox Solo knife.
    - Comprehensive but compact personal first aid kit inc analgesics and broad spectrum antibiotics (prescription)
    - Sterile needles / sutchers / i/v kit for by doctor / medic if we do need emergency treatment
    - Antimalarials (usually)
    - Anti diarrhoea kit inc rehydration and specific antibiotics (vary by region)
    - lightweight wash kit & contact lenses
    - small repair kit (needles and thread, few spare buttons)
    - duct tape wound around old credit card sized keycard, few zip ties, 5m paracord (doubles as washing line)
    - Lightweight personal water bottle (but bottled water is usually abundant anyway - I hate the wastage of PET bottles)
    - lightweight microfiber towel
    - Sunblock 30 plus wide brimmed hat
    - Mosquito repellant.
    - $ cash and credit card (works wonders)
    - Notebook for diary & 2 pens.
    - Travel docs

    All carried in 1x Camera backpack and 1 x 40l (small) rugged duffel bag. Apart from 10Kg camera gear (handluggage) hold bag is about 8Kg all up. A bit over the 15Kg light airplane allowance but we average out as my wife doesn’t have the camera bag load and I load some of the above into her hand luggage (inc 1 change of clothing for each of us in case of probs with check in luggage loss - yes, its happened once).

    Nothing that exotic really, no big knives or guns (guides have these when necessary - frequently they are not). No anti venom. No big guide / animal books - camps have those and guides can give you much more info anyway. No GPS, as I’m not walking out of anywhere if there is a problem, I stay with the truck! And I wear good treking/walking shoes in preference to boots these days. The only thing I’ve not needed or used is the first aid gear but that’s also the one thing that never gets left behind on the next trip because it wasn’t used.

    I haven’t taken a solar charger as we have found most camps have (big banks of) them now anyway plus banks of batteries so you recharge from these. Solar power has made a big impact in recent years. Off grid is much less of an issue now.
     
    T Shrapnel-Carruthers likes this.
  10. skukuza

    skukuza Loaded Pockets

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    A practical knife would be better than the largest you can get away with and a stretchy crepe bandage applied to the entire length of bitten limb( http://www.stjohnnsw.com.au/snake-bite/ ) is far better than an extractor.