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UK Car Carry!

Discussion in 'Other Carrying Devices' started by Jetpac, Jul 22, 2012.

  1. Jetpac

    Jetpac Loaded Pockets

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    I've just cleaned my car for the first time in a while and realised it is woefully unprepared for bits and bobs! I'm after a bit of advice of what i should carry in the back... im not planning any bug out type situations, just stuff that may come up in every day life or heaven forbid car accidents etc

    kind of "oh, i've got that in the car.. be right back" kind of things as well without being over the top.

    Bear in mind:
    • I drive a small European compact car (Peugeot 206, not much trunk space)
    • I will not often be that far from civilisation
    • I am not a trained medic or mechanic (or currently have much knowledge of either)
    • Weather extremes in the UK are few and far between (we may have a few hot days, few cold days.. lots of rainy days and snow maybe once a year for a few days where i am)
    • I have good breakdown cover
    Currently:
    • Jack + socket wrench
    • Hazard triangle
    • Variety of pens and pencils
    • Sunglasses
    • Mints
    • small AAA Cree light
    To be added that i will be doing shortly:
    • 4x Hi-Vis vests
    • Bottled water
    • First aid kit (advice wanted on contents)
    So my question what should i be looking to add without adding too much based on my circumstances and what should i be looking to carry in a decent vehicular first aid kit (most of the ones i have seen in stores seem to be very badly stocked, and bear in mind no medical training)
     
  2. evolutionglitch
    • In Omnia Paratus

    evolutionglitch Loaded Pockets

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    Metal and plastic zip ties. -They can be used to reattach your bumper or exhaust or whatever is dangling off your car after a fender bender. They are also useful for turnaquettes or compression bandages for firstaid. Also good for fixing about a million things.

    DUCT TAPE - I just dont have the time, space, or will power to list out all of its merits and uses!

    SAK - duh...

    Lighter - Even inurban environments, it could save your life. Heck If all it does is light a cigarette for your tow truck driver, it is worth it. They are a lot more pleasant when they see you as human and not some idiot whos causing them hassle.

    Your WITS - Always keep these about you. If you need a card in the boot to remind you to calm down, assess the situation, and deal with the most critical first, then do it. Remember to think Like MacGuyver and you'll manage to get out of your scrapes.

    Just my thoughts of course so take or leave what you please. Cheers!
     
  3. YLR2312

    YLR2312 Loaded Pockets

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    Some things I keep in my trunk that you may have but didn't list.

    -A towel, shop rags, disposable shop rags. Many uses, I put the full sized towel there after my friend spilled water on my seat one day.

    -Jumper Cables, helps to have when your battery dies like mine did earlier this week. Often times people are willing to help you but they don't have cables, make sure to get the proper gauge or better for your vehicle.

    -Some road flares for breakdowns.

    -Empty gas can, I've had to use mine several times to help other people.

    -Some stable snacks like clif bars, just in case you get hungry.

    -Some trash bags/dollar store drop cloths in case you need ground cover or a poncho or a million other things.

    -Assorted bungee straps because you may need to hold your trunk closed if you need to put something big in it like a bicycle.

    -Cleaning up stuff like hand sanitizer/wet wipes.

    I know there's a lot more but it's nothing worth mentioning. Another good thing to have though is a bag to keep most of this stuff in, especially if your spare tire is in the floor of your trunk, this allows much faster access. I use a condor tactical response bag, and I also have the condor rip away emt pouch in there for regular first aid stuff like bandages and gauzes. Some important things I still want to add to my trunk kit is a wool blanket, a viair compressor (already have plugs), some decent work gloves, and a car size fire extinguisher.
     
  4. Kilted1

    Kilted1 Loaded Pockets

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    Booster cables.
    Fire extinguisher.
    Can of fix-a-flat.
     
  5. Si_K
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Si_K Loaded Pockets

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    For winter you might want something like snow socks if the council gets caught out and doesn't grit the roads.
     
  6. jools roche

    jools roche Empty Pockets

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    Always carry a sense of humour and loads of patience,,,,,, keep a cheap mobile phone in the car with only your important numbers including the breakdown company and your membership number and ICE contacts (in case of emergency) keyed in,,, enough cash to buy a few gallons of fuel,,,,, a cheap waterproof jacket and a hat ,,,,, a small sheet of plastic so you can kneel in the mud while changing a wheel, or sit on the verge while waiting for the AA, and a wind-up torch that doesn't need batteries. First aid,,, pain-killers,,, indigestion tablets ,,, a roll of elastoplast fabric plasters,, a roll of elastoplast tape ,,,small pair of scissors,,, In winter a plastic shovel,,, in summer (hahahahahahahahaha) a bottle of water
     
  7. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    To repeat what's been said really;

    Good jump leads
    Overalls/handling gloves for keeping clean changing a wheel (they go when you're in your best clothes on your way out!)
    Waterproofs/ponchos (for all) - stood by the side of the motorway in the rain isn't fun
    12v compressor - who checks the spare tyre pressure...?
    I carry a couple of big golf umbrellas, many uses, someone can hold one when youre working for example
    2 litre bottle of water for you or the radiator
    Jubilee clips for hoses - various sizes
    Cable ties - various sizes
    Duct tape
    Small bottle of screen wash - handy to top up, or like 2 years ago when it was so cold, the wind chill was freezing screen wash on the motorway. I had to pour it on direct while driving just to see to be able to pull over. Scary. Very, very scary.
    Socket set
    Pliers
    Screwdrivers
    Wind up torch
    Normal torch (good batteries that keep in the cold)
    Inspection lamp
    Blanket
    Tow rope
    Paracord
    Spare fuses - various
    Spare bulbs to suit your car
    Notepad/pen for swapping accident details etc

    I know it's a lot, but all this lives in a tiny alcove behind the back seats in my pickup, so no room lost. I should take pics really and share... Does the 206 have cubby holes in the boot area side panels? If not, try packing the spare wheel well with some items, put some under the front seats ( secure it so it can't roll under your pedals!), maybe in recesses under the rear seats?

    Edit; chem lights for when you forget to heck the torch batteries, and the handle snaps off the wind up one. Redundancies.

    Also, I wouldn't recommend cable ties as tourniquets. They can be a bitch to cut at the best of times, without also cutting swollen flesh that has covered them up...
     
  8. Jetpac

    Jetpac Loaded Pockets

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    That's great ta!

    Yea space is pretty limited, there is no recesses under the rear seats and no cubbies in the boot so space is a premium.
    I mean i play lacrosse and i can pretty much fit my kit bag in the boot, or 1-2 regulation sets of golf clubs (with long clubs removed). There really is not a lot of room.

    under the front seats is doable though.

    Screenwash is already there.. didnt think of an umbrella that would be handy!
     
  9. Mr_Sea-Breeze

    Mr_Sea-Breeze Loaded Pockets

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    A lot of good ideas above but I never go anywhere without an emergency book (a novel to read in an emergency not a book on emergencies). Having spent 8 hours to travel 15 miles when we had a light snow flurry in 2007 it was a godsend

    MSB
     
  10. Mr_Sea-Breeze

    Mr_Sea-Breeze Loaded Pockets

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    Is the spare in the boot or underslung in a 206? The well of the spare wheel can be used for storage but not very practical if the spare is underslung...

    MSB
     
  11. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    No worries.

    You can also get bag/pouch type things that will hang off the rear seat, keeping floor space free. Pockets attached to the underside of the parcel shelf? A lot of stuff will fit in door pockets and glove box. Instead of golf umbrellas for example, try the compact ones. Definitey get some gloves though, even if its just a 10 pack of nitrile ones. Maybe wet wipes too or those 'wipe anything' worksite wipes for any grease/brake dust you get on you :)
     
  12. Narcosynthesis

    Narcosynthesis Loaded Pockets

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    A few extra things I would add:
    Jump leads - a very simple fix for a flat battery, and one I have had to help sort out on other cars numerous times, so a set of leads and the five minutes it takes to learn how to use them.
    Torch/headtorch - for when you need to replace a tyre or have other problems in the dark - even in urban areas you can find yourself having to switch a tyre in the shadow of the car rather than under the nice bright streetlight...
    Moist wipes - available in small packs and perfect for after you have had to sort out something like a flat tyre and need to wash your hands.
    Duct tape/cable ties - small and indispensable items for quick repairs.

    Most of that can be easily hidden - Stuff like duct tape and jump leads can probably be fitted around the spare tyre in the bottom of the boot, and things like wipes and a light I want to keep easily to hand so keep in the glovebox.

    In addition to those it never hurts to have a couple litres of water, some food (just make sure to pick something shelf stable that won't mind a hot day in the car) and perhaps a change of clothes and other basic essentials - perhaps a small holdall in the boot that doesn't take up too much space.
     
  13. Jetpac

    Jetpac Loaded Pockets

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    Yea
    its underslung in the 206 which is a bit of a downer, but on the plus side the jack is stored in there as well!
     
  14. jag-engr
    • Administrator

    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    Great suggestion! I have found that, more often than not, a 12V cigarette lighter compressor can top off a tire well enough to get you somewhere safe. Avoid changing a tire on the side of the road if at all possible. If you get a big hole or gash in the tire, or if the tire blows out, you will need to change it on the side of the road.

    I do - I check the pressure on the spare before a long trip. Your point is a valid one, though. If you have a donut spare, they usually require higher pressure (around 60psi) and have a harder time keeping that pressure. Driving on a donut is dangerous enough without the tire being under-inflated.

    I don't think anyone has mentioned this, but definitely include some space blankets. They come packed very tightly and take up very little space. Being in the UK, the most likely disaster that you will face is probably snow related. If it's snowing, then you and your passengers will need to keep warm.
     
  15. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    My spare is full sized, but a complete pain to get to as its under my truck and has to be winched down - a fiddle operation.

    Laziness kicks in, so I only check it once or twice a year... It's quicker to blow it up if it's a bit low than to drop it, check it, and remount it!
     
  16. Blackheart

    Blackheart Loaded Pockets

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    Accugauge sells a hose with a female Schrader valve on one end and a male on the other. The idea is you connect one end to your spare and route the other end to your rear bumper somewhere so you can easily check the spare's pressure. [shrug]

    Doesn't hurt to drop the spare every once in a while to make sure the hoist mechanism isn't frozen with rust.
     
  17. Jetpac

    Jetpac Loaded Pockets

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    You wouldn't bloody believe it! On my way to pick up the supplies for the car today some :censored: decided to drive down the middle of a fairly narrow road so i had to swing my car to the side and shredded the tyre!.. Luckily it was a nice day today.. bloody typical! ha!

    I do have a couple of space blankets in the car :)
     
  18. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    Cheers, didn't know about the hose thing!

    As said, I'll drop it maybe twice a year for checks, and will grease it :)
     
  19. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    I've done the same in the past. Now I'm a bit older and more jaded, I tend not to swerve if someone is in the wrong and coming at me. If I do, it's my money. If I don't, it's their fault and they cough up. Or move. I've not been hit yet, but I do drive a big :censored: pickup, or a 3.5 ton panel van, both are filthy and scratched. Mr 'cocky BMW bully' driver tends to shift pretty sharpish if they try bullying me...

    I'm not an aggressive driver, but will stand my ground :)
     
  20. boyo17

    boyo17 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Time moves on and for me that means I have reached "Old Git" catagory.

    After many years of driving experience I've gone from "carry everything that might be useful" to "take everything out everything that hasn't been used in the last year" idealogy. My car is a lot tidier and has a lot more room inside,,, is lighter and uses less fuel.

    I have a wind-up torch, hi-vis waistcoat, a waterproof jacket and a pair of gloves. A cheapo mobile phone is permanently in the car. There is always a bottled drink and a basic first-aid kit with a few extra elastoplasts and that's all. Normal precautions are observed with a shovel in winter and a warm coat.

    If I'm being bullied into giving up my rightful place on the road then I find it helps if the other driver sees me looking the other way
     
    shmook likes this.