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Thoughts on the Spyderco Sharpmaker

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Jimmer2109, Nov 20, 2013.

  1. kertap75

    kertap75 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    It reprofiles the blades. And that can take a looong time if there is a drastic difference

    Remember, big brother is watching
     
    Nick4305 likes this.
  2. mushnz

    mushnz Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks...
    Is there an easy way to tell what angle the knife's blade is before using the sharpmaker?
    I have a bunch of dull kitchen knives, a spyder Tenacious and a few leathermen...
     
  3. kertap75

    kertap75 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I'm sure there is, but I don't know how lol. I know that my 2 chefs knives had slightly different angles. and where very, very dull. It probably took me an hour to an hour and a half apiece to get them where I wanted them. I didn't try to do it all at once, I just worked 10 minutes at a time when I could.
     
  4. blacmud8

    blacmud8 Loaded Pockets

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    You hold the knife in your hand, so with knives with a more obtuse angle where the rod won't touch the edge at all you can just twist your hand so that the edge itself is touching the rod. You'll be able to feel/hear where the edge is. Like semi-freehand sharpening. The fact I had to do this on so many knives is one of the reasons I now feel like you might as well just go straight to freehand.

    If you keep the knife with a more obtuse angle completely perpendicular to the table the rods won't touch the edge, so I guess if you persist (as in hours of sharpening) it will re-profile it to the angle of the sharpmaker. With knives with a more acute angle it will work fine but will change the geometry if, for example, the knife has an acute microbevel or a zero bevel or a scandi or a convex. That probably made no sense.
     
  5. barlow666

    barlow666 Loaded Pockets

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    All of my knives are “users” - I use them for cutting anything from an apple to fiberboard. I keep them sharp but don't want an edge so fine that it will chip with heavy use.

    My Sharpmaker gives me a good working edge, quickly and easily. I keep one on my desk. I find using one to touch up my blade of the day to be a great way to relax. Fortunately, I work out of my home.

    Only Sharmpaker downside IMHO, is periodically having to use scouring powder to clean the abrasive rods. Hate that bleach smell on my hands. Other than that, no complaints after 10 plus years.
     
  6. comis

    comis Loaded Pockets

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    Unless you are using something like a "wicked edge", it will be very difficult to tell the 'exact anglel by free-hand or sharpmaker. I do suggest to contact the manufacturer if the angle is really of real concern to you. But the 30 and 40 deg inclusive, provided by sharpmaker, are really quite commonly used angle for kitchen knife to general user blade.

    One easy way to tell whether the pre-set 30 or 40 deg (inclusive) will suit you knife is to use a maker to paint the entire area of the bevel black, then use the highest/softest grid to sharpen the edge. If your technique is correct and the paint comes off evenly, it will mean you are honing the entire bevel and the angle suits the edge well.

    To original OP, I do highly recommend the sharpmaker, simply because it is easy to setup, doesn't require a lot of skill/practice but the result is great.
     
  7. Donut
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner

    Donut Loaded Pockets

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    Use the Sharpie Trick. Take a magic Marker, paint in the bevel. Run the blade on the stones a bit, and you will see where the magic marker is removed from, hopefully the edge.
     
  8. that_stupid_kydd

    that_stupid_kydd Loaded Pockets

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    personally i love my sharpmaker. i cut a lot of really thick cardboard at work so my knife dulls rather quick, i find that the sharpmaker gives me the option of quickly throwing a utility edge on a blade before i head out the door or letting me sit down at night and put a razor edge on my self defense knife (i live in canada and can't carry a gun). thin my hands aren't very steady so i was never very good at freehand sharpening which is what drew me to the sharpmaker in the first place, with the course and fine stones that the kit came with i was rather suprised at how sharp i could make my knives. the other night i sat down before making dinner to sharpen my main kitchen knife, after running it over the stones then wrapping the case in newspaper the use as a strop i got my knife to the point that the weight of the blade was enough to make it cut through newsprint cleanly
     
  9. Montani

    Montani Loaded Pockets

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    I'm happy with the results the sharpmaker gives. Relatively easy to get a good edge and it does a good job on serrations too. Those ultra fine rods should be in my stocking for Christmas.
     
  10. mushnz

    mushnz Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for the advice guys...
    I think I will buy one, try that trick with the sharpie and see how it goes...
     
  11. Gravy

    Gravy Loaded Pockets

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    Couldn't you just order some ceramic rods off amazon and mount them on a plank of wood? You could even drill differents sets of holes for different angles. Just my 2 cents.
     
  12. SpyderPrepper

    SpyderPrepper Loaded Pockets

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    The sharpmaker works brilliantly well for touch ups and maintenance. As long as you don't let your knives get overly dull to begin with, the sharpmaker is outstanding. Problems arise with heavy sharpening and/or reprofiling. You can squeeze some extra angles out of the sharpmaker with a rubber band. On the 20 degree setting, if you put an elastic band around the base it brings them into about an 18 degree per side angle.

    Here's where the sharpmaker is better than any other system: serration sharpening. I've yet to come across a system that does them better.
     
  13. J_C
    • In Omnia Paratus

    J_C Loaded Pockets

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    Yes, that's one of the limitations of the Sharpmaker. It's only set up for 40 and 30 degree edges. If you get a knife with a factory edge that isn't very close to one of those in the first place, it will take quite a while using just the included stones to reprofile it to one of those two bevels.

    You can pick up a set of the diamond rods for the Sharpmaker, but those cost almost as much as the Sharpmaker itself.

    I personally use a set of 3 DMT diamond bench stones to set the initial bevels if needed and then use the Sharpmaker to smooth and maintain them.

    Once you get the initial bevels set, the Sharpmaker is a great tool for maintaining the edge. I also like to follow up with a strop made from an old leather belt and some chromium dioxide polishing compound.
     
  14. Freman

    Freman Loaded Pockets

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    I've just bought one myself, just for quick edge keeping and the majority consensus that it's a good system with some limitations is the conclusion I arrived at myself. I generally find myself just using the 40° setting to slap a microbevel on the edge. For that it works very well. I wouldn't use it for extensive reprofiling though, as said the stones are more fine and extremely fine, than the medium and fine they're claimed to be.

    Simply grabbing some sharpening stones at your local hardware store, about 8" x 2" and practising with them will give you the skills you need to get a good edge. Perhaps not the mirror polished edge you can with an Edge Pro, but a good sharp serviceable edge. Once you have the skills even the base of a ceramic mug or plate can be used to resharpen.
     
  15. Snappy Hat

    Snappy Hat Loaded Pockets

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    I got an old one , pat pending , when they were selling at the Cal state fair long ago.
    But like others here, I have gone to Japanese wet stones and prefer the stones.
    But sometimes if yu are new to it and just want to sharpen up fast the sharp maker
    or other devices that are similar do the job. Smith makes a cheap one like this (17 buxs) , try it
    first see if you like it then go to the Sypderco ?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Official Sypderco Leather wrap lol.


    [​IMG]
     
  16. Jimmer2109

    Jimmer2109 Loaded Pockets

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    Are you talking about the smiths 3 in 1 sharpening kit? Just curious because $17 bucks sounds a lot better than $50 haha.
     
  17. Jimmer2109

    Jimmer2109 Loaded Pockets

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    Also does anyone have any experience with the smith 3 in 1 sharpener? The price between that and the spyderco shaprmaker is pretty big. And since I do not want to sharpen my knives free hand, yet, would this be a good choice for decently sharp blade? I dont need the sharpest blades ever, I just want them to stay at a working sharp level
     
  18. grayman

    grayman Loaded Pockets

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    I spent a lot of money on all different types of sharpeners. Lansky, DMT, natural stones, wheels for a grinder, etc. to think of a few. I bought the Sharpmaker and haven't looked back. I eventually picked up the diamond rods and the extra fine ceramic rods as well. It works great on pocket knives. I've found that, more often than not, if a knife dulls, I can hit with the fine rods and I'm back in business. Thick fixed blades are more cumbersome to sharpen, but folding knives have never been a problem.

    My issue with natural stones/bench stones is keeping my angle right.
     
  19. jcc

    jcc Banned

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    Learn freehand sharpening. Your investing the time into something, you might benefit from it by learning a skill. It's a lot easier than people believe it is.
     
  20. Reijos

    Reijos Loaded Pockets

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    Not to derail the OP, but does anyone on here use a Wicked Edge? I have a sharpmaker and find it mediocre on a number of blades (ones that don't fit the original angles that the sharpmaker accepts). I have watched a lot of the videos on the wicked edge and it looks awesome but MAN is that price hard to swallow.