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Those who do not sharpen

Discussion in 'Sharpening Stuff -- Stones, Strops, and Systems' started by huntnow, Mar 27, 2017.

  1. baccar-3

    baccar-3 Loaded Pockets

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  2. Thisguy93

    Thisguy93 Loaded Pockets

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    I do this when my ptsd has flared up that day. Completely calms me and makes me focus on the task at hand.

    Sent from my LG-K373 using Tapatalk
     
  3. SOS24

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    I try to sharpen my own knives but can never get them as sharp as I want to, sometimes I even feel like I get nowhere. I've tried a couple different methods to help, with the latest being a strop.
     
  4. huntnow

    huntnow Loaded Pockets

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    After further sharpening and consideration, it occurred to me perhaps being raised in a family of hunters encouraged my ability to sharpen knives. After all, one can only field dress and process a certain amount of game without the need for sharpening. Anyone else have similar experiences?
     
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  5. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    I don't really use mine enough to dull them much and I don't need them sharp enough to shave with. In fact, the large gash in my left forearm with attest to the fact that I probably shouldn't be entrusted with a razor sharp knife. I keep them sharp enough to whittle with and that's good enough for me.
    Besides, getting a knife scalpel sharp means you have to spend more time maintaining them.

    Sharpening knives is definitely therapeutic. I've spend more than a few bad nights sharpening all the knives in the house as well as all of my chisels. Because it requires so much focus, it's very good for blocking out the rest of the world.
     
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  6. EveryDayBeer
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    EveryDayBeer Loaded Pockets

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    I'm not good (or practised, maybe) enough to sharpen my own pocket knives. Spyderco only charges five bucks for four knives and most of my knives are Spydies. For the nicer ones I'll ship them off to Colorado and wait a couple weeks. Gonna have to pick up a few beater knives and practise. As in buy a few extra right. :D

    I will however go to town on the cheapie kitchen knives!
     
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  7. J_C
    • In Omnia Paratus

    J_C Loaded Pockets

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    Never mind - forum ate the posts and not worth retyping.

    Short version: I am self-taught late in life, no family history of sharpening or hunting. I do a pretty good job though it took me a while of reading, watching videos, and a lot of practicing to get to where I can maintain my knives on stones freehand without much effort.
     
    Last edited by J_C, Apr 17, 2017
    #27 J_C, Apr 17, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
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  8. Dingle1911

    Dingle1911 Loaded Pockets

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    I have found that I used to just buy new knives instead of sharpening them. Since I started to down size my collection I had a desire to keep my knives sharp. I have had a Spyderco Sharpmaker for a few years now. I have had mixed results, some knives I can get very sharp, but some not so much. And I cannot tell what I am doing differently. I think that the Sharpmaker works when the bevels are set at 30 or 40 degrees inclusive, but if the knife is different then it will not work well.

    I finally dropped some serious coin on a Wicked Edge. I have only had it for 2 days, but I am starting to see good results. I am working up the skill to sharpen a knife I actually care about. I am really looking forward to having all my knives shaving sharp.
     
  9. BklynBoy

    BklynBoy Loaded Pockets

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    I find that spyderco sharpmaker is easy to get good results with. My everyday carry is Sypderco ZDP 189 blade and usually requires just the rare swipe over the steel in the Kitchen knife block to keep it very sharp. One or twice a year I resharpen on the sharpmaker. The trick is to avoid letting the blade get so dull it needs to be reprofiled
     
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  10. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    Sometimes you need to check that you are matching the bevel angles on knives that are not Spyderco if you're using a Sharpmaker. I bought it to sharpen my Spydercos with serrations and it is a marvelous little tool.

    My most sharpened knife is a 14 inch woods knife. I sharpen that on a strop everytime that I use it. That is the only way to keep from spending hours getting it sharp again.

    Sent from my SM-P600 using Tapatalk
     
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  11. Dirty Rod

    Dirty Rod Loaded Pockets

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    Me too. Took a few tries to figure out the right angle to use on any given knife but simple and effective. About once a month 1-2 of mine need touching up.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    Are you adding the 40° microbevel? I don't even bother using the fine flats at 30°.

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  13. Dingle1911

    Dingle1911 Loaded Pockets

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    I thought the 30 degree was the micro bevel and the 40 degree was the primary bevel.
     
  14. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    If you plan on using a micro bevel:
    Clean up the edge at 15° per side (you probably have that already). Then switch the sticks to 20° per side and just do a few swipes of the brown and white. Maintain the edge with 4 or 5 very light swipes on the white often. Your PM2(?) will shave the hair off of your arm easily.

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  15. Dingle1911

    Dingle1911 Loaded Pockets

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    I think the Spyderco Sharpmaker is great at maintaining an edge where the bevel matches the preset angles. It is great for taking the edge back to shaving sharp.

    I am slowing becoming on who DOES sharpen. I find great satisfaction in using a sharp knife and I don't mind using it as I can just resharpen.
     
  16. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

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    I am of the mind a person either can sharpen a knife, or they can't. It matters not what 'system' they use. I think sharpening a knife is one of the darkest kept secrets in the knife-enthusiast world. Many people love knives, and love to show them off to others, but secretly, deep inside, are somewhat ashamed they are not really able to keep that same knife sharp once it dulls or loses its edge.

    Knife sharpening is an acquired skill, and there's just no easy way out. You either "get-it", or you don't. However, one can learn to "get-it" and become excellent at sharpening knives, but it takes time and practice. It's as much art as it is science. Science is fairly easy to learn, art is far more difficult. In the end you have to be able to "feel" the knife you are trying to sharpen, you have to be able to tell (without any fancy gadgets) when you are "on" the edge. It is my opinion that many of the 'systems' out there actually interfere with 'feeling' where the knife edge is.

    I was fortunate in that I learned to sharpen knives the old fashioned way from a master knife and tool sharpener (and a patient one too), my father. He actually loved to sharpen things so much he'd rather sharpen something than use it even. I learned there are two basic kinds of sharp; there's "sorta sharp" and then there is truly 'skeery' sharp (exquisitely sharp). It all boils down to understanding the edge on the knife you are trying to sharpen. That, and understanding what that edge is made from (i.e. the characteristics of the materials and hardening process of the edge itself). In the same breath, there are also different edges for different applications. For example, a straight razor isn't going to be worth a hoot dressing out a full sized Elk, much the same as an exquisite hunting knife isn't going to be worth a hoot shaving. Equally, that hunting knife isn't going to be worth a darn chopping down trees, whereas an axe will do it all day without complaint.

    I learned to sharpen knives on whetstones, oil stones and Japanese water stones. It takes time, and it takes practice. In fact, it takes time, even when you know how to do it, to get it right. Consequently, over the years, I have had many people tell me about easier 'systems' and I've tried many (probably not all, but quite a few). My take on most of these systems is none of them really "sharpen" an edge, but rather straighten and refine an existing edge. The Worksharp (Ken Onion) system may be the one possible exception because it comes closest to approximating to the original knife edge grinding process (but it does have limitations though, and if one isn't careful it can actually damage an edge).

    I mostly sharpen knives on an Arkansas medium stone (for a badly mangled edge) and an Arkansas fine stone, and then strop (with and without rouge). I can honestly say the thought of using a coarse stone on anything but a badly damaged axe sends chills down my spine. And, many of the cheaper sporting goods store type sharpening stones are WAY too coarse to do anything but more damage to most edges. Quality stones, in the correct size, will yield quality results...in the hands of someone who knows what they're doing.

    My recommendation to people interested in learning to sharpen is to start with a decent oil stone. Learn how the edge will "push" the oil when you're actually "on" the edge. I also recommend learning on a quality piece of carbon steel. Crappy stainless full of a bunch of chrome can be more frustrating than anything else to sharpen. Poor quality steel causes more people to give up learning to sharpen (which is not intuitive, people think they'll learn by using a crummy knife, but actually the reverse is true). It takes a really good knife sharpener to sharpen a crappy knife steel, but someone with less skill will be able to sharpen a better quality steel much easier (and with much better results).

    Just my .02 Hopefully it helps.
     
    #36 DCBman, May 3, 2017
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
  17. Ghostwalker54
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    Ghostwalker54 Loaded Pockets

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    The art of freehand sharpening appears to be lost. It's the the only way for me.
    [​IMG]


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  18. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    I tried to sharpen freehand for years, but could only get me knives "sorta" sharp. Sharp enough for most tasks, but never quite enough to make me completely happy. Nowadays, I go between my Spyderco Sharpmaker and my Worksharp belt sharpener. Seems to work pretty good for me now.


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  19. Thisguy93

    Thisguy93 Loaded Pockets

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    I will only free hand. I'm faster free than most on machines that I've ever met

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  20. Dingle1911

    Dingle1911 Loaded Pockets

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    I tried to free hand, but I cannot get my knives as sharp as I wanted. With my Wicked Edge I can finally get my knives sharp. And I realized that I really like sharp knives.