1. Please update your bookmarks to use https://www.edcforums.com/
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Thick folders: why?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by AvocadosNumber, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. AvocadosNumber

    AvocadosNumber Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    I'm wondering the above as I order another CRKT Pilar, as it happens. I have one right now that's wicked sharp and serves as an OK box cutter/letter opener, but I tried slicing strawberries with it and .... yeah, it just wasn't meant to be. The design is somehow too charming for me to resist, but the chubbiness of that blade does nothing for me other than add pointless weight and reduce slicing ability.

    Which is leaving me to wonder: why are so many folders out there, even smaller ones, so thick? I believe you could slim down the majority of folding knives out there today and it would only improve their functionality, without significantly reducing their durability. I suspect arguments about "standing up to hard use" are underrating the toughness of thinner blades. Besides, how many people are really using a Pilar-sized folding knife primarily as an axe/prybar? (And if so, why not a fixed blade?)

    Are there thick blade fans out there who object? Am I just neglecting some common use cases, or is this all just marketing to people who don't much care about how well a knife actually cuts?
     
    Last edited by AvocadosNumber, Apr 27, 2018
    #1 AvocadosNumber, Apr 27, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
    Moose likes this.
  2. Daveho

    Daveho Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    232
    Basically thicker stock allow for more obtuse blade geometry which keep lesser steels useful for longer.
    If you want a really slice happy blade check out your Opinels for a budget friendly option and the spyderco chapparal for a more up market option.
     
  3. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    5,161
    I don't really see how liking a thick blade has anything at all to do with liking a thin blade?

    Both are useful and each has its own strengths and weakness,why not have both?

    To suggest that having a thick blade somehow means I under appreciate the toughness of thin blades is silly.

    But the idea that a thick blade will be tougher just seems obvious as well.

    I like both and have no intention to change that.
     
    Danny Baker likes this.
  4. huntnow

    huntnow Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    354
    I edc a ZT 0900 and like it a lot. It has the thickest blade of any folder I've owned. It will slice meat well but like you said, not too good with produce. Im okay with that.
     
    Moose likes this.
  5. ThaMac
    • +1 Supporter

    ThaMac Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Maybe it’s often more the IDEA of being able to use your folders hard, than actually doing it. Look at the YouTube Russian hard use videos. But who uses a knife this hard anyhow? As said, maybe it’s the idea that you COULD do it. They break a PM2 there, I guess I remember by batoning through sheet metal.

    But there is the point for me. As an EDC the PM2 (as an example) is a great knife. Slices well and holds up, when doing the most tasks. BUT then I carry an XM-18 sometimes, because I COULD pry open the door of a car with it.

    Sent from my Glade Air Freshener
     
    Moose likes this.
  6. Onepoint

    Onepoint Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2009
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    9
    Aesthetics vs. Functionality.

    On a daily basis I do my food prep with a good Chef’s knife but I have a bunch of knives. Japanese knives — Chicken, Fish & Vegetable, plus a Santoku, and an American Butchering Knife, a Carving Knife, Boning Knife, and a American cleaver and a Chinese Vegetable cleaver. I use utility knifes for certain tasks.

    In a pinch you use what you have, but if you have good tools you use them when the tasks calls for it.

    You need to buy a bunch of different knives to actually learn what works for YOU.

    At some point things like Little Fat Bladed Stubby Knives will wind up in a box or a drawer and in memory or story.

    If you’re going camping, set a budget and do your due diligence. Be careful about bring stuff from the home kitchen, especially your mom’s. Things tend to disappear when you’re pressed to rush due to storms, bad winds, etc.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
    Moose and Moshe ben David like this.
  7. AvocadosNumber

    AvocadosNumber Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    I can see the appeal of knowing that you could pull yourself out of a pile of rubble, and do all these other things you _might_ do, with your knife. The point where it gets excessive for me is when this ability to handle extreme situations comes at the expense of functionality you're more likely to want from the knife in real life.

    Maybe a lot of you out there are spending more time prying into cars with your pocket knives than slicing food or opening packaging, and if so, I guess you just live a more exciting life than me. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ (Also, I'd be wondering why you aren't just EDCing an actual prybar, or at least a fixed blade. Right tool for the job, etc.)
     
    TDS, Moose and Moshe ben David like this.
  8. AvocadosNumber

    AvocadosNumber Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    Certainly there could be appeal in both. But have thinner blades actually broken/failed for you in the past? I ask because I've seen people baton wood with thinner blades on well-built knives - maybe not Opinels, but thinner than your average heavy duty folder - without breakage. It leads me to believe that the need for thickness is overstated, even in "hard use" situations.
     
    #8 AvocadosNumber, Apr 27, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
  9. AvocadosNumber

    AvocadosNumber Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    5
    I do have a Chaparral, actually! It's a great knife, and my usual EDC.
     
    Moose likes this.
  10. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    5,161
    I love my Chappie too but I work in construction mostly and trust me thicker is just better in general there where I never really have to think about it.

    I also very rarely have a legit need for thinner blades so they are just not what I carry.
     
  11. Yablanowitz

    Yablanowitz Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    May 29, 2006
    Messages:
    723
    Likes Received:
    950
    Thicker blades allow more room for stupidity. I truly believe that the vast majority of today's population have no skill in using knives and insufficient attention span/ patience to develop any skill. The "hard use" crowd seem to believe that the knife contains skill. The thicker the blade the more skill it can contain. If it contains enough skill, they don't need to supply any.

    Yep, I'm an old geezer. Excuse me while I go chase the kids off my lawn.
     
  12. Daveho

    Daveho Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    232
    Nice :) They are fantastic knives through n through!
    Very slicey! There’s something to be said for fantastic steels and geometry better for actually cutting things, that said there is a time for thick stout blades and hamfisting your way through a task.
     
  13. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,635
    Likes Received:
    3,452
    Different blades for different tasks. There's a reason why even in the most basic kitchen you'll find different sized and shaped knives. If you want to turn a tree into kindling you simply need a completely different blade than you would need for slicing a tomato. Most 'tactical' blades you see will be advertised as being able to function as weapons, when fighting you don't want a blade to snap off so it has to be thick. Do you break open crates and open boxes a lot for your work, get a nice thick strong pry-bar-esque blade like that itll serve you fine. Like slicing your strawberries and apples for lunch? Get a good ol fashioned opinel.
     
    FLbeachbum, Lateck, Tesla and 2 others like this.
  14. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    5,161
    I can not understand how this is not obvious either?
     
  15. Buckeye Jake

    Buckeye Jake Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2014
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    473
    Its simple really. Thin for slicing, thick for rough stuff. Also breaking a knife isnt a test of it. For several hundred years woodsman, farmers and hunters use thin blades. Why ease of use and sharpening. Look at the Mora style. Thin ,sharp.
    But using one to spit wood is just plain silly. Maybe in a survival situation, life or death it would make sense.
    I have a couple of busses that see hard use , but the thin edged get the most use.


    Jake
     
    Moshe ben David likes this.
  16. ThaMac
    • +1 Supporter

    ThaMac Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    May 6, 2015
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Don’t we all know the person that uses this kind of knife for basically every kitchen task? *cringe*

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my Glade Air Freshener
     
  17. Todd21969

    Todd21969 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2015
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    265
    Maybe some of us don't use our carry folders to slice strawberries?

    The knife I carry is .145" at the spine (Pillar is .15 per specs online) tough enough to be used roughly. Yet no one has ever accused the Spyderco Military of not being able to slice.

    To each his own though. I doubt you have the same job , hobbies , daily knife use needs that I have.
     
  18. Buckeye Jake

    Buckeye Jake Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2014
    Messages:
    483
    Likes Received:
    473

    May I ask what you carry . I do have a three sisters forge ,that i carry at times


    Jake
     
  19. Todd21969

    Todd21969 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2015
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    265
    For the past four months a Spyderco Military in CTS-204p.

    Carried a Military in S30v for three years before that.

    Using one its hard to believe it is .145 at the spine.
     
  20. Hangman
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Hangman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2014
    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    2,408
    Personally, I like many different knives. I carry at least 3 with me every day. I rotate my primary knife, it can be anything from an Adamas to a Sebenza. My secondary knife is always a fully serrated Spyderco, most often it's a Delica. My third knife is always an SAK of some type. I work for an equipment/party rental company and don't have any idea what I may encounter from day to day. It might be cutting out wood jammed up in a wood chipper, or busting through mud caking up a tie down point for a skid steer, or cutting away vines/strings/ropes etc. that get caught around the tines of a plug aerator. I would carry a fixed blade instead of a larger/thicker folder if I could carry it more concealed, but #1 the law in MD says I have to open carry a fixed blade, and #2 my employer frowns on carrying a fixed blade openly, therefore a larger/thicker folder it is. OH, forgot to add, I always have a Surge on me so there are two more blades if needed.
     
    Moose, Lateck and Moshe ben David like this.