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Survival bike

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by BrendanH, Jan 22, 2018.

  1. BrendanH

    BrendanH Loaded Pockets

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    how come in every zombie/apocalypse movie or tv series, everyone walks or drives? Always running out of fuel, breaking down or getting jumped by shambling undead.
    A bicycle needs no fuel, easy to repair and increases your speed and carrying capacity massively. It's silent, durable, easy to hide and if you happen to lose or break it there's millions of them laying about. If you lose your bike in a non-apocalypse situation, you can buy a half decent ride for less than $200.

    Does anyone here build a bike in to there EDC or general preparedness plans?
     
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  2. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    Good in theory, poor in form. I (nor any non-cyclists) certainly couldn't hop on any kind of bicycle and ride it up a series of hills on paved road much less dirt. That's a particular type of conditioning. My strength training program has built me up to a 300 pound working squat, but that doesn't translate to pedaling neither does my running regimen. My field partner and I "liberated" a pair of rental bicycles from some tourists during some urban escape and evasion training, but I had significant trouble navigating turns, stopping, etc. Fortunately, this was in relatively flat terrain. "Grayman" I was not, but I was able to clear the area of the search party.

    Biking is immensely popular in my area with some beautiful paved and unfinished trails, but it doesn't really appeal to me. There's also a limitation in what you can carry that I suspect would be less than beneficial in an evacuation. This does beg the question. Can you walk with more stuff or bicycle with more stuff?
     
  3. FLbeachbum

    FLbeachbum Loaded Pockets

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    Never given this any thought before, but here is my guess. Most movies are made here in the US for a US audience. Bicycles are still not all that common here for adults. That is starting to change in some places but it is still a very small percentage of the adult population. And that is just the people who bike on occasion for enjoyment or exercise. The vast majority of the adult American population would not consider biking a mode of regular transportation the way the rest of the world does. You definitely do not find "a million of them laying around" and I would not like to stake my life on the chance I will happen to find one in an emergency.
     
  4. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I haven't done any of this.

    But your post reminded me that one of the adult sons (I think it is Eiven, Otto's son) on Alaska: The Last Frontier has just done something like this; I recall his purpose was mostly to facilitate faster/quieter travel into back country for hunting!

    These guys keep coming up with 'interesting' homemade items!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  5. WillAdams

    WillAdams Loaded Pockets

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    Well, they did get used in the movie World War Z.

    I have been considering carrying my bike in my truck:

    [​IMG]

    and I need to get a folding kayak to go with it (and to resolve the matter of the Axa Victory frame lock interfering w/ the fold).
     
  6. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    I got into ultra -light/-compact/-multitasking camping gear a couple years ago and it's transformed the fun/versatility factor of a several different outdoor pursuits for me. This rig got me back into short bicycle touring. It's not really suitable for off-road, of course, but you won't be able to cover any distance off-road around here anyway.

    [​IMG]

    In a bug out situation, it's absolutely one of the first rigs I would grab.

    Just messing around, but THIS would be my multi-tiered "wheeled" BO approach. Did I mention I hate walking? :D
     
    #6 reppans, Jan 22, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2018
  7. plumberroy

    plumberroy Loaded Pockets

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    I am 56 years old and 300 lbs I do ride often . I can ride 30-40 miles on road/hardpack trail any time and have done up to 65 miles with tools and a days gear a
     
  8. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    Also consider a bike as something to which you attach your pack and walk alongside/push. In that example, you don't need bike-specific physical conditioning as you could walk it uphill and ride it down the other side. Add in a bicycle trailer and you could have a substantial post-apocalypse travel setup.
     
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  9. LivingUpNorth

    LivingUpNorth Loaded Pockets

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    Well, sort of a mix of both. I think you could haul quite a lot more with a bike, even without modifying it. For example, you could hang a full hiking pack to each side of the bike using straps/paracord/whatever. Two packs for yourself, or one for you and one for someone who possibly is injured and couldn't carry a 50lb pack on foot. This assumes you're walking with/pushing the bike. If you had an inexpensive bike trailer, such as the kind to tow children around, you could ride the bike with significant cargo, although towing does assume some amount of physical conditioning.
     
  10. SOS24

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    I think a bicycle could be a good part of a preparedness plan, especially if you consider fuel could become in short supply and roads may not be passable.

    My plan includes my cyclocross bike with the rear rack and panniers transferred to it from another bike. I also have a dog cart that could be used for transporting supplies.
     
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  11. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Well, IIRC, this approach worked for the North Vietnamese to move supplies through the jungle on the Ho Chih Minh Trail, didn't it?

    No, I wasn't there, thank G-d!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
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  12. BrendanH

    BrendanH Loaded Pockets

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    Many people go touring on bikes and carry a full camping/traveling set up for extended periods so a bug out bike set up isn't too far fetched I suppose. Perhaps keep an extended EDC in a handlebar bag or rucksack a spare set of rear panniers with a bug out/survival/camping set up at home or in the car. Just swap your everyday rear bags for your bug out set and ride in to the sunset
     
  13. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Here is my Surley Travelers Check that is a Cross Bike AND it knocks down into a small enough package that it can be carried in a bag or case too.

    This one is Steel and built for abuse more than light weight and would be what I escape on/with should that need arise.
    There is a rack on back with a removable expanding bag/pannier and this one is made for substantial racks on the front too.
    It is set up for distance right now but depending on the tires mainly can be and is great off road too.

    While it is true that we can only pedal so far it also has to be easier to carry more stuff on the bike and dragging it along than on my back alone if the terrain allows at least.


    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  14. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

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    A "half decent" bike for under $200? Maybe I'm a bike snob, but I certainly wouldn't want to go very far on a sub-$200 bike. They're heavy, poorly built and usually impossible to find parts for.

    Riding on singletrack does take considerable training. I like to get my triathlon buddies on singletrack so I can leave them in the dust even though they can outride me on the road.
     
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  15. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    Looks a lot like Brompton?


    Sent from my NSA monitored iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  16. WillAdams

    WillAdams Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah. I keep thinking that I want to try cloning my Swissbike frame in steel, or titanium. Probably if Montague did a Kickstarter for a titanium frame I'd have to buy in. Really hoping things work out well for the Helix folks, though I'm not sure I could justify the second bike.
     
  17. BrendanH

    BrendanH Loaded Pockets

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    You most certainly are a bike snob, but that's cool. So I'm I, just without the cash to splurge on a new MTB. My current bike cost $30 second hand and the same again in new bearings, bracket and cables. I'm planning on getting a decent hardtail MTV for single track type stuff but I'm sure any supermarket 'mtb' or budget offering from a big brand is more than good for everyday use, perhaps not if you want to do serious single track but fire trails etc should be ok. And more than good enough to let you bug out/get home
     
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  18. enine

    enine Loaded Pockets

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    For under $200 you can buy a used bike that will outlast a $200 new bike. I went that route after we moved. Bought a well used and dirty Specialized Rockhopper from someone who was moving away for $150. It already has scratches so I'm not afraid to get it scratched up. I learned how to do maintenance like taking the wheel bearings apart to clean them.
     
  19. Weko

    Weko Loaded Pockets

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    Bicycles can be loaded with upwards of 800 lbs. You are going to be pushing it. There are specially made cargo bikes that can be loaded with 400 lbs and are still rideable
     
  20. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

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    If you know a bit about bike maintenance and repair and have the specialized (lower case 's') tools, this can be a great way to get an expensive, high-quality bike cheaply. Zen and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance is a great manual for learning how to work on MTB's. I think there is also one for road bikes but most of the concepts transfer.
     
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