1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Special Warfare Insignia, NAVY SEALS.

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by AcesQ, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. AcesQ

    AcesQ Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    I'm always interested in the U.S. Military history. I'd been trying to find out who actually came up with the idea and created the Special Warfare insignia, otherwise known as the "SEAL Trident". But all I found is that, it's created during the 1960s. Anyone knows?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. FreestyleAssassin

    FreestyleAssassin Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    2
    I can't provide a resource in regards to who the individual was who decided to combine these various maritime elements into what became the "Budweiser".

    But the elements that where chosen all seem pretty self explanitory. The anchor for the Navy, the trident as the weapon of the god of the oceans, the eagle for America and the flintlock pistol, perhaps for the aske of being different from the infantry rifle or perhaps because it was easier to wield a pistol on a ship, in conjunction with a cutlass.
     
  3. VT-aroo

    VT-aroo Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    Messages:
    908
    Likes Received:
    167
    from what I have read, and I will see if I can find the referance, They wanted someting a bit less, and proposed this thinking that it would be to gaudy. And it was accepted.

    No offense meant to anyone who wears one with well earned pride.

    Page 109, Brave Men Dark Waters Orr Kelly Pocket books 1992
    The original was smaller but bore too much similarity to the pilot insignia and so was rejected by members of the Navy Board. And once in use, the wearers liked it and did not want it changed.
    the anchor representing the sea
    the eagle for the air eliment.
    the pistol for land combat.

    the budwiser is just becaue it looks like the label on a bud.
     
  4. hardcider75

    hardcider75 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    5
    "The anchor symbolizes the Navy, our parent service, the premier force for power projection oo the face of the planet and the guarantee of world peace. However, it is an old anchor, which reminds us that our roots lie in the valiant accomplishments of the Naval Combat Demolition Units and Underwater Demolition Teams. The trident, the scepter of Neptune, or Poseidon, king of the oceans, symbolizes a SEAL's connection to the sea. The ocean is the hardest element for any warrior to operate in -it is the one in which SEALs find themselves the most comfortable. The pistol represents the SEAL's capabilities on land - whether direct action or special reconnaissance. If you look closely, it is cocked and ready to fire and should serve as a constant reminder that you, too, must be ready to fight at all times. The eagle, our nation's emblem of freedom, symbolizes the SEAL's ability to swiftly insert from the air. It reminds us that we fly higher than any other force. Normally, the eagle is placed on military decorations with it's head held high. On our insignia, the eagle;s head is lowered to remind each of us that humility is the true measure of a warrior's strength."

    -LT CMDR R. Ballantine
    from "The Finishing School; Earning the Navy SEAL Trident" by Dick Couch
     
  5. AcesQ

    AcesQ Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    That was really cool. Thanks for your explanation.
     
  6. FreestyleAssassin

    FreestyleAssassin Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    2
    Is LT CMDR R. Ballantine than supposed to have been the guy who designed it? Or is this a a poetic composition about the SEAL Trident by LT CMDR R. Ballantine?
     
  7. ScarletPimpernel

    ScarletPimpernel Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2008
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    I wonder if the designer was inspired by the remarkably similar UK Combined Operations Badge? Dating from 1942, it consists of an eagle (representing the Royal Air Force), an anchor (Royal Navy and Royal Marines), and a sub-machine gun (Army). The eagle has a lowered head, as in the RAF cap badge, shoulder badge and buttons.

    In August 1942 Lord Mountbatten wrote to Eisenhower:

    Subsequently relevant US personnel wore the badge - some used an unofficial version with an American eagle (presumably with head up).

    The Combined Operations Badge is still in use, and worn by staff of the UK Permanent Joint Headquarters (PJHQ) when deployed on ops.
     
  8. Misanthropic_Gods

    Misanthropic_Gods Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2009
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    26


    This is the US Army Engineer Special brigade SSI
    [​IMG]

    This is the US Navy Amphibious Forces SSI
    [​IMG]

    This is the British Combined Forces SSI you speak of, I dont think the SEAL Trident really is a direct descendant of the Combined ops/ESB/Amphib Forces insignia, there is a good chance they stole a few design elements, but it wasnt meant to be a direct link between them, as the other units had their own rich and varied histories.
    [​IMG]