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Space efficient emergency food.

Discussion in 'Where, When, & How Do We Carry All This Stuff?' started by amacman, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. Krustofski

    Krustofski Loaded Pockets

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    When it just comes down to energy density and nutrients, BP-5 can't be beat. It's ridiciously expensive, unless you are a relief organisation, though.

    I'd personally just stock up on rice, beans and canned goods.
     
  2. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    Baked wheat flour, Partialy hydrogenated soybean oil, Sugar, Soya protein concentrate, Malt extract, Minerals, Amino acids, Vitamins [[1]]

    you can probably mix up something similar at home- put some multivitamins in the food processor until they're powdery
    whole wheat flour + peanut butter makes a complete protein; soy/whey protein are also complete (by themselves)

    combine that with the vitamin powder, and you're set.

    or try making some cookie/biscuit/etc mix: take your favorite dry mix recipe, and add vitamin/whey powder while removing flour (or sugar, or something else to get the volume right). keep that in a jar labeled with how much water it needs.
    then when disaster strikes, bake the biscuits up, or pan fry them, or whatever.

    hmm, I kind of want to try this the next time I go camping...
     
  3. iomatic

    iomatic Loaded Pockets

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    What if you're gluten-intolerant, or lactose-intolerant, or diabetic, or have yeast candida? Wheat== bad, sugar== bad, Carbs== sorta bad.

    What about dietary-specific foods for people for MREs and other protein bars? Thx.
     
  4. FRagman1967

    FRagman1967 Loaded Pockets

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    Canned goods like soups/fruits/vegetables are great. Unbag rice and beans and place in glass gasket topped kitchen cannisters.
    Beans and rice mixes in foil packets keep forever.
    PB and honey pack lots of nutritional value for their weight, and are often on sale.
    Ramen and canned vegetables makes a good inexpensive meal, same with spaghetti and canned/jar sauces.
    A box or two or Bisquick and some milk and eggs make lots of different things, so I always have a box in the freezer.
    I always have a box of dried nonfat milk set aside in case I can't get to the store, and with the biscuit mix and even a box of dehydrated eggs, you are good to go.
     
  5. Krustofski

    Krustofski Loaded Pockets

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    BP-5 is kind of specifically constructed to cirumvent problems. No lactose, no nuts (or peanuts either), no yeast, nothing of animal origin, nothing frowned upon by any major religion in the world.
    From this point of view, it's actually better than most convenience food, MREs, camping meals and whatnot. If you're coeliac... oh well, yes, you have a point there.

    Like I said, BP-5 is the most size-efficient food I can think of. Still, I prefer to fill my pantry with rice, beans, canned goods and some spices and additional vitamins. Because I actually enjoy to EAT this stuff, and can rotate instead of stacking away dead investment. I do have the space, though.
     
  6. Katdaddy

    Katdaddy Loaded Pockets

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    Ya know, it's funny how you can overthink something like this. I love peanut butter and always have a jar in the house. Thinking of emergency food it never came to mind. Right in front of me all the time!!! :(
     
  7. TempestV

    TempestV Loaded Pockets

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    If you want the most compact, most calorie dense food out there, then lard or blubber will fit the bill. A number of solo arctic explorers have lived off of it for extended trips, simply because it was the lightest thing that would deliver the amount of calories that they needed in a day.

    That doesn't mean it's the best for your circumstances however. One of the most common survival scenarios would be a power outage. If you live in a city, with an electric stove, that probably means no cooking ability. Luckily, it probably won't last that long, so a handful of MRE's or canned goods that are good to eat cold, like baked beans would work great.

    If you can cook, then basic baking staples will work best. It's reasonably easy to make good bread with flour, yeast, salt, and maybe a little sugar. Beans are cheap and good nutrition. You could also stock a whole lot of canned good in a small space for reasonably small amounts of money.
    A couple 50 lb bags of your basic staples and a box of canned goods will keep you fed for a long long time, without worry of anything spoiling.
     
  8. Flight-ER-Doc

    Flight-ER-Doc Loaded Pockets

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    The advantage of peanut butter over lard or blubber (aside from taste) is that the peanuts have protein. Many of those arctic explorers died from protein-deprived malnutrition (Kwashiorkor), despite having enough calories.

    But you are correct about storing food: A years supply of staples can be fit into 6 or 7 6-gallon plastic buckets.
     
  9. TempestV

    TempestV Loaded Pockets

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    Also, in the arctic, you need to have massive calorie intake in order to stay warm and active, particularly with the load that those guys are carrying. As a result, you can eat enough to fill your stomach without over eating. In order to maintain a 2000 calorie diet, your portion sizes would have to be absolutely tiny. I suppose I should have specified- that was something to think about, not something to consider as a serious survival food.
     
  10. mess1102

    mess1102 Empty Pockets

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    these are a bit bigger than a power bar but an MRE can keep a normal non in a combat zone fighting person going for two days maybe three if your a smaller person
     
  11. Ren

    Ren Loaded Pockets

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    Ah see someone already mentioned BP-5. My bad.
     
  12. jdub4key
    • In Omnia Paratus

    jdub4key Loaded Pockets

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    If water is not an issue how about some whey protein powder. Takes up little room and shaken/mixed with water will give you a good source of protein. The come in tons of flavors too.
     
  13. Ren

    Ren Loaded Pockets

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    Another suggestion Plumpy'Nut

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumpy'nut

    Supposedly something like 18p (GBP or ~30 cents USD) per sachet, but haven't found a source.]

    Sounds like peanut butter, with some vitamins and minerals.
     
  14. Cervantes

    Cervantes Loaded Pockets

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    peanut butter and tactical bacon in the can.
     
  15. Highvalleyranch

    Highvalleyranch Loaded Pockets

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    The survival food needs for an apartment and a BOB bag, or even EDD are quite different and such a vast range.

    The smallest I have found for everyday EDC, for those times you "bonk" and need to survive the strains for another few hours are POWER GU.
    One little packet of this will give you enough energy to last another four hours.
    It's gotten me through many a times when I could not get to real food in a hurry.
    Easier to go down than a power bar and you don't need water.

    Also for the smallest emergcy life support food for your 3x5 maxpedition bag, look at the life capsules.
    They are supposed to be able to sustain you for days, and one bottle of 30 pills cost 30.00, but could last over a couple of weeks time on it.
    Note: I haven't tried these yet, but plan to get some, and what I wrote is from the reviews.

    I keep a packet of power gu on me at all times, because you never know when your car might break down out in the middle of nowhere, or you might be stuck in an elevator for a day.
     
  16. HOMELAND SECURITY HAM

    HOMELAND SECURITY HAM Loaded Pockets

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    Hi amacman,

    I will hijack this thread a little. Since your question had the statement that "space is at at premium" I will recomend that you obtain a 24" high waterbed drawer storage pedistal instead of your box spring. Then fill it as you can with things like MRE"S, Mountain House Freeze Dried Meals, Cases of Ramen Noodle Soup, (don't forget a water purifier) Peanut Butter, Rice, ETC...

    But all kidding aside, do a google look up of the tall waterbed storage pedistal. They are Cosmetically atractive and extremely functional for space efficiency (they are great).

    Good luck,
    Cliff
     
  17. brianwhynot

    brianwhynot Loaded Pockets

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    Where do you find these life capsules?
     
  18. Highvalleyranch

    Highvalleyranch Loaded Pockets

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  19. brianwhynot

    brianwhynot Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting stuff. Thanks for the heads up!
     
  20. jbgecko13

    jbgecko13 Empty Pockets

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    Here is some good info, at least I think so.
    When I was in the Iraq desert in the first war we ate MRE's every day for every meal minus about maybe 20 meals over a 6 month period. We were fine and could work.
    With that Said MRE's are heavy but they are more entertaining than mountain house because of all the little extra stuff you get. And that matters when your bored :) Cause you can make stuff with the bags and matches :)

    Having recently started putting together 3 day kits for my family we are stating with the DATREX® 3600 Calorie Food Bar's 1 in each Bag.

    Next we are going to get a mix of mountain house meals and MRE's to insure we have no water foods and and water add foods.

    The easiest and smartest way IMO is get a KATADYN® Pocket™ Water Filter, it has the best filtration and lasts for 6000 gallons, I would be this thing could get water from oil lol.

    We will also have all the tools necessary to find water and food as well.

    All this stuff fits in the Emergency Essentials large backpack for 14 dollars, not trying to sell their stuff but I love a deal :)

    For Your apartment food storage I would recommend #10 cans of freeze dried, it seems to rehydrate really fast and tastes really good and you could easily take up the space of a closet and have food for weeks.

    Emergency Essentials has specials every month on cases of food, and lots of variety. Again I am just a customer of theirs and dont work for them :)