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So here's the thing...

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by tadbik, Apr 18, 2009.

  1. Dizos

    Dizos Loaded Pockets

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    Good work getting him together with an instructor!
     
  2. greenLED

    greenLED Empty Pockets

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    Yup - :roof:

    Just for reference, a G26 with the grip extension pretty much becomes a G19 (in terms of grip length/size and concealability). Have him shoot the G19 and compare against the G26. I found the G26 to be "too jumpy" in my hands, as opposed to the G19, which fits and feels nice. YMMV, of course, but something else to think about.
     
  3. protaganis

    protaganis Loaded Pockets

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    If you have a gun shop and range nearby that lets you rent firearms, take your friend there and try one of each caliber and design. Some pistols just fit your hand like you were born to carry it and your natural aim with it is good. Hso has a great point, and the right pistol will complement this skill. The instuctor may also be able to point you in the right direction of pistols to try.

    The best gun for your friend is the one they will be comfortable shooting and get enough practice to become competent with.
    The biggest scariest gun is useless if they can't hit anything with it.
     
  4. mercop

    mercop Empty Pockets

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    The CZ 75 is like that. Melts into your hand like a joy stick.- George
     
  5. Exmasonite

    Exmasonite Loaded Pockets

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    and why would that be? above and beyond his choice of gun, he should really strive to practice and become proficient with whatever weapon chosen. for example, the range i frequent doesn't allow buckshot to be fired. so, i end up shooting a lot more pistol (and the occasional slug outing). Given that, i would reach for my pistol for HD long before my shotgun just because that's what i shoot the most and feel that i'm most proficient with. i appreciate the arguments in favor of the shotgun but i want the tool that I feel most comfortable with.

    anyway, i'd try to push that practice, practice, practice is the key.
     
  6. tadbik

    tadbik Empty Pockets

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    Well. if anyone knows of a gun shop and range in the Hudson, Ohio area, I'd be pleased to get the details. Hour's drive in any direction would be ok. Thanks
     
  7. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    conceal carry = no light, no laser, no accessory (easier to conceal without that stuff)

    that being said, get a glock
    i've got a glock 26, 9mm subcompact
    others prefer the glock 19

    try them out at a range (especially the 26- you'll understand when you try it) before buying!
    practice
    practice
    practice!
     
  8. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    +1 do NOT bluff with a gun
    DO
    NOT
    BLUFF
    WITH A GUN

    if you pull a gun on someone, you had better be ready to use it! don't even think for a second the sound of a shotgun racking will make someone think twice- if it does, then great, but it might not, so be ready for it!
     
  9. El Verbo

    El Verbo Empty Pockets

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    ++1 on that.

    If you flash a gun on someone and DON'T use it, they'll probably come back somehow (with friends, at night, when you're out with family) and you'll wish you'd used on them!
     
  10. Kabong30

    Kabong30 Empty Pockets

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    OK, so let's review...If you pull a gun be ready to use it. But what if you have a teenager in the house? Maybe said teenager snuck out of "your castle" and is sneaking back in? And you and your eagerness to get a round off at some thug just killed your child. Man, if you had just taken that extra second to qualify your target. Maybe if you'd made some sound or said, " I have a gun!"

    Don't be so eager. Be ready, but not too ready.

    And BTW, if you don't have time to practice, then you don't have time to own a gun. Gun ownership is more than a right. It's a responsibility.

    I read a great little quote today. "Use statistics to defend your rights. Don't become one."
     
  11. jehan60188

    jehan60188 Loaded Pockets

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    obviously, you want to tell your kid about the gun. And of course, you identify your target, and what's behind your target before shooting.

    I would have to disagree/agree with you on the gun ownership being a right. It IS a right. And with ANY right comes responsibility. We must use our rights responsibly so as not to give government an excuse to strip them from us!

    +1 on the practicing- not just range time, but dry firing drills, and defensive shooting classes, too!
     
  12. jackknife

    jackknife Loaded Pockets

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    I have to comment on this, and what I have to say is going to be unpopular with some.

    If this person is not going to practice with whatever gun he ends up with, then he shouldn't be owning one.

    Gun ownership in this country is both a right, AND a privilege. We have the right, because it's written into our constitution, and that gives us a privilege that some other countries don't have. But owning a gun, and not practicing is both stupid and careless. A gun is not a magic wand, that you can wave in the direction of a bad guy and he's going to run in terror. Some of them have had guns waved at them before. Some have been shot before.

    Buying a gun and taking a few lessons from the gun shop "pro" and then putting the gun away till something goes bump in the night, is a recipe for disaster. At 2AM in the morning, half asleep, scared, gropping around, is no time for trying to remember what goes where, is the safty this little thinkgy or is that the magazine release. One incometent gun owner blowing it big time is better ammunition for the Brady bunch than anything. "Gun owner tries to shoot it out with mugger and gets killed" is a great headline for Sarah Brady, who preaches that gun harm thier owners more than criminals.

    A gun is a huge responsibility. You are taking on the responsibility for the lives of your family, as well as the lives of strangers you will never meet, if you carry that gun CCW. You're going to be carrying that gun, and if, God forbid, you have to use it, you owe it to everyone to hit what your shooting at. Not miss your target, and kill an innocent pedestrian down the street or on the other side of the parking lot where you're getting mugged. In Washinton D.C. the punk gangbangers shooting at rival gang members have hit victims from a 6 year old girl playing in her front yard, to a 76 year old grandmother sitting in her living room watching TV.

    I'm sorry, and I appologize too all, but my feeling is, if you are not going to practice with that handgun at least once a month at the very minimum, once a week is better, then maybe you should just have a can of OC, and a backup weapon like a walking stick or ASP. Leave the guns for those who are willing to dedicate themselves to staying skilled with them. That means lots of practice.
     
  13. Dreadnought

    Dreadnought Empty Pockets

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    First, welcome to your friend who has made the decision to protect himself and his family with a modern defensive tool. This is can be difficult for folks who never owned a firearm before and everything they "know" about guns they derive from TV and movies ("handguns kill x number of people a day"...no, people using or mis-using handguns do such-and-such).

    I am a die-hard GLOCK fan, and I am not afraid to admit it. I am also a lover of the 1911. I believe every firearm owner should eventually own a snub-nosed .38 revolver as well. But my advice for a first time gun buyer who is also a first time gun owner/operator is a little odd.

    Smith & Wesson Sigma 9mm.

    Why? Firstly, it's inexpensive, but not "cheap". It is close enough to the design of the FAR superior in every way GLOCK that GLOCK successfully sued S&W over it years ago. It is simple to operate. Simple to break down and clean. Magazines are inexpensive. Ammunition is cheaper (none of it is cheap right now, is it friends?). It's a Smith & Wesson, a brand I trust. It has an accessory rail. It is durable. It is concealable but also large enough to spread the recoil for a new shooter. The ergonomics of the weapon are pretty good (some really like them). They are NOT a GLOCK and so they are deficient -- IMO -- in many ways. But they are very serviceable and worth more than they currently go for, again IMO. When your friend decides he want something better -- 1500+ rounds down the road -- he can trade it in and probably recoup most of the money he spent buying it.

    As to GLOCKS, I am one of those ".45 Guys", so I own all of the GLOCKS chambered for the mighty .45ACP (models 36, 30 & 21). But the GLOCK 26 is a tremendous firearm. Very concealable and most folks would not think it, but very accurate. The bonus with the G26 is that it will use ALL GLOCK 9mm magazines. SO you can run the standard 10-rounder, or shove the GLOCK 19's 15-rounder in there, or the GLOCK 17's 17-rounder, or even the ridiculous GLOCK 18's 33-rounder. All of them click right in and run perfectly. That's a lot of options for a little gun.

    I am a HUGE proponent of lasers. Didn't use to be, but I have been converted fully. I won't go into it here, but I'll just sum it up by saying that if for no other reason it is an additional tooll to have on-board your weapon. It is not to "replace" your iron sights, but only to "augment" them.

    Over the years I have come to favor pocket-carrying my firearm, mainly due to the fact that I work in an office environment and must wear business-casual attire five days a week and even a good tuckable IWB holster is often too sloppy for meetings, etc. With that in mind I have bought, sold and tried dozens of handguns to fit in a pocket. Your friend's circumstances may be similar to mine, and if so, eventually he may be trading the Sigma in on something smaller. I have a few recommendations for that as well, but again, I will save them for some other time/thread. :)