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Show RESPECT & Old Gear, for Dads, Granddads, Family, or Friends

Discussion in 'Other Every Day Carry Items' started by snowkiwi, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. snowkiwi
    • In Omnia Paratus

    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    Reminded me of some pics I meant to post.

    The only WWII items I have of my granddads. (The rest went to another cousin)


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    Leather dog tags


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    Shoulder patch: British Commandos
     
  2. flatblackcapo

    flatblackcapo EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Some of my Grandpa's kit.
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  3. Tuesday

    Tuesday Loaded Pockets

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    Growing up, my brother and I would go camping with my grandparents almost every weekend every summer. This went on every summer from about age 8 to 16. I have some great great memories from those trips.

    One such memory is of a multi-tool of my grandfathers that he would let me play with every trip. He taught me the basics of each tool, and I spent many many hours carving sticks and using the shavings to start the campfire, and cutting other sticks into usable kindling, and fire pokers.

    Eventually I got a summer job and the camping trips for me became less frequent and eventually non-existent. The giant multi-tool was a forgotten item.

    Grandpa passed away in 2005 and about 2 years ago, while poking around in grandpa's tackle box in my grandma's shed, I came across that very multi-tool. The memories came flooding back and I had to bring it home. It's huge, heavy, and dull as all get out, but man I love this thing! I wish I knew more about it, grandpa probably said what it was and where he got it, but I don't remember any of that. Posted below alone, and with my Medium CS Voyager for size

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  4. Tuesday

    Tuesday Loaded Pockets

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    double post
     
  5. nick nitro

    nick nitro Loaded Pockets

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    Sweet
     
  6. comeonbabylightmyfire

    comeonbabylightmyfire Loaded Pockets

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    Apologies for the wall of text and photos but you might find them interesting.

    My maternal grandfather in 1914 prior to his first deployment.
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    He was badly wounded in 1915 and certified medically unfit to serve. During this time he was given white feathers by two different women who saw him out of uniform and were unaware of his condition.
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    After convalescing he attended army cookery school in 1916. Some sample details taken from his notes include water purification methods and pictures of trench field kitchen and storage/preparation areas.

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    On his second deployment to the trenches in January 1917.
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    He was captured after the battle of Cambrai on 30th November, 1917. The regimental diaries state that his unit, 6th Liverpool Rifles, had been subjected to a sustained artillery bombardment followed by an infantry attack that they successfully repelled, before they absorbing a heavy gas barrage. In chilling detail they report, ‘there was no-one left’ [to defend their positions].

    After capture he twice attempted escape and was moved to 17 times to different POW camps in his 11 month captivity, before making his way back to England after 11th November 1918. His notes record that on 13th November, ‘Germans left us’.

    POW notes and local press report from the Liverpool Echo) of 1917

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    This picture I vividly recall from my childhood, although he never spoke about the war. I can remember how he’d scratched out the weapons and faces of his captors. He’s in the second row down, behind and to the left of the seated soldier with the shield. A duplicate picture, not defaced, still survives.

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    He witnessed a sympathetic Belgian farmer summarily executed for smuggling unauthorized photographs like these out of POW camps. He's on the right.
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    A forced labour camp in Belgium. He's the second left of the second row from the bottom.
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    On his way home 13th November 1918. Fourth row down on the left wearing a baker-boy cap. Taken at the nunnery where they stayed overnight during the march.

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    The rear of another postcard dated 16th November, detailing how English POWs were being recaptured and forced to pull German equipment to the borders.
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    Prior to discharge in January 1919. He's on the right in the group photo wearing a sergeant's stripes, posing with his mate from the army flying corps.
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    Some terrible phone pics of his trench art lighters that I took before I donated his effects to the Chester Records and Archives Office. They were made from the spent brass shell casings. I EDC'd them until I gave up smoking six years ago.
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    Marrying my grandmother in 1926.

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    Here I am, between him and my grandmother in 1962.



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    Him as a boy outside his home circa 1905.

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    I donated his remaining effects to Chester Records and Archives (and to whom I should thank for reproducing these photos), after I accidentally discovered their local media stories last year. IIRC it’s against the rules to post links, but last year the local press ran reports, an exhibition was mounted and a Flickr feed produced; due to heightened interest surrounding the centenary commemoration of the Great War.

    Until reading the original press story I had no idea that all this had happened to him. Nor did my dad who also served during WW2 and subsequently married his daughter!
     
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  7. Brtsmpsn
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner
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    Brtsmpsn Oh, Canada!

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    comeonbabylightmyfire this and posts like it deserve a million likes. Thanks for sharing. I wish I had more stuff from my grandfathers who both served in WW1 I need to dig out the little I have and post pics.
     
  8. snowkiwi
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    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    What Bart said. I wish I had more of my granddads old stuff to remember him by. comeonbabylightmyfire thanks for sharing - very interesting to read.
     
  9. Sharaz_Jek

    Sharaz_Jek Loaded Pockets

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    My pap...

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    He was in the Army Air Corp during WWII. He finished training just before the end of the war so he never saw action. He did get to fly some cool airplanes though such as the AT-6, Stearman bi-plane, and the P47.

    After the war he started working at Piper Aircraft ferrying planes and working on the line.
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    This is him on the far left in 1984, the year Piper left town and the year he retired. He worked there over 30 years and was a foreman when he retired.

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    This is most of his EDC. Both pens are Parker. The watch is a Bulova. As you can see the Piper logo is on the band. Each jewel represents ten years so this was his gift for 30 years of service to Piper. Of course, a Zippo. The knife is made by Imperial and is still razor sharp after all these years. His dog tags weren't an EDC but I wanted to put them in the shot anyway.

    He was a great man and the biggest influence in my life. Unfortunately he passed away in 2003.
     
  10. snowkiwi
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    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    30 years at Piper - Those were the days when people stayed at a job most of their lives. My granddad worked at a lawn mower assembly plant after the war for 40+ years, till he retired. Thanks for sharing Sharaz_Jek
     
    Last edited by snowkiwi, Aug 25, 2014
  11. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Shared a lot of great items, pics and personal memories lately here.
    Every single thing deserves a great respect.
    And have all mine.
    Thanks to you all.
    Nick
     
  12. Sharaz_Jek

    Sharaz_Jek Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah. It's a real shame what has happened to our industrial base here in the states. There are other reasons for the way things are but I don't want to hijack the thread.
     
  13. comeonbabylightmyfire

    comeonbabylightmyfire Loaded Pockets

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    Here’s my great uncle in the royal navy during WW2. The brother of my grandmother shown in above post.

    He was torpedoed twice within three weeks while on convoy duties in the Atlantic. He emigrated to the USA after the war. First to Florida before settling in Bronxville, New York.


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  14. Monocrom

    Monocrom Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting and then some. Thank you for sharing all of that.

    You mentioned that he never talked about his service during the war. If you are interested in learning just what actually went on, there is a book out there written by a veteran of that war. "A Rifleman Went to War" by: W.H. McBride. A truly fascinating read that destroyed some preconceptions I had. Though an American, McBride joined the Canadian military (then a major part of the British Commonwealth) so he could get into the war at a time when America was staying out of it. A good deal of the training that McBride, an already experienced soldier, went through was at the training grounds in Britain that was being used at the time.
     
  15. thol

    thol Loaded Pockets

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    I have read it all in this thred and I love it all :) And you are getting pictures of the clocks I got from my granddad.
     
  16. KentuckyRock17
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    KentuckyRock17 Uber Prepared

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    That coin…



    I want it.

    Beautiful coin.
     
  17. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Thanks !
    Nick
     
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  18. comeonbabylightmyfire

    comeonbabylightmyfire Loaded Pockets

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    That’s very helpful, Monocrom. I’ve just downloaded a cheap e-pub copy on Amazon and there’s a chapter on the British army that I’ll look into later.

    Thank you all for your warm comments.

    During WW2 my grandfather became an air raid warden; his torch, shown below in the dreadful picture, works perfectly.

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    Due to its proximity to Liverpool docks, Merseyside and the surrounding areas were subjected to heavy air bombardment and twice their house lost all its windows from blast damage after bombs exploded nearby during the nightly air raids. Neither my grandparents nor my parents spoke much of their experiences, not even my aunt who provided the photographic resources that generated the original story - about my grandfather being wrongly accused of cowardice. The memories are just too painful I expect.

    I think that most people who lived through the huge traumas of the two world wars, understandably felt reluctant to talk and effectively relive their ordeal. They simply wanted to forget. My own peers have similar stories. Our parents never ‘talked’ about the war but they constantly ‘reminded’ us, forever telling us how lucky we were. They were right of course. We were ungrateful. But as teenagers we lacked the maturity and insight to fully comprehend the collective trauma our parents’ generation suffered. We didn’t share their values and this was reflected in our nihilistic teenage rebellion. It was selfish but there wasn’t the national focus; with everyone united in defeating the common global enemy of fascism.

    However, with age comes wisdom and the appreciation of what previous generations sacrificed to enable us to live as we do now. It is my belief that we should not abuse those liberties; neither should we allow them to be taken from us.

    Note the identical design of the octagonal leather ID tag issued to snowiki's dad's in the above picture some 25+ years later. No change to the 1914 issue shown here:

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    I promise to stop hogging the thread now. :)
     
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  19. Jaybrowndetroit

    Jaybrowndetroit Empty Pockets

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    Just a huge note of thanks to all who posted, especially the grandson of Sidney Upton. These stories are priceless histories and give us hope that there were and are honorable and fine men in the world. Boy do we need them now!

    My own grandfather survived Auschwitz and went back to testify in the 1960's. Rarely talked about it. I have his Omega manual-wind watch, probably purchased about 1960.

    My father was in the Korea-era US army, stateside. I have some photos of his basic training in the American South, showing the racial building signs regarding segretation: totally bizarre to a New York boy.

    I've re-read many of these posts here multiple times. What a heritage some of you are fortunate to have!

    Regards.
     
  20. snowkiwi
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    snowkiwi EDC Junkiwi

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    It's not hogging at all. I wanted to see these types of stories , why I started this thread, so no worries there. They are important pics and stories of what our grandparents went through. Those generations are sadly dying off way too fast.

    It's interesting hearing about how they don't like to talk about being in the war and conversely how we as kids would celebrate war. Playing soldiers with my cousins in granddads backyard with sticks and pine cones.


    Cool to see another old leather ID tag too :)

    Sent via Tapatalk from a nice hobbit hole... Now MY BEAR CAVE !
     
    Last edited by snowkiwi, Aug 30, 2014