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Setting up a EDC bag ( Newbie )

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by bigant2984, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. bigant2984

    bigant2984 Loaded Pockets

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    I purchased my 5.11 covert 18 i love the bag it has enough space for what i need or think i need, I carry files a clip bored an Ipad pens tape measure also some basic hygiene, phone accessories, Also i carry gym shoes if i am wearing boots along with an extra shirt shorts socks underwear. Now this is were i need help from the edc community since i am new to this. what are some important necessities that you carry or think i would need. I commute on the train once or twice a week.i spend most of my time in a car working traveling around the boroughs. i also might have to walk from the city to queens like i did during the blackout were i was completely unprepared. Any tips recommendations or any information you can provide. thanks
     
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  2. Tallboyjim

    Tallboyjim Loaded Pockets

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    Enough cash for a train ride home, flashlight, packable jacket, SAK, few meds (anti headache, anti squirts, that sort of thing and a couple of plasters). Snack bar, drink if you want. If you're thinking a proper Get Home Bag you might want more but that's all I take.
     
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  3. bigant2984

    bigant2984 Loaded Pockets

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    great thanks i def will make a small med kit
     
  4. ac7ss
    • In Omnia Paratus

    ac7ss Loaded Pockets

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    Definitely a flashlight and a "boo boo kit" (minimal first aid kit), change for fare separate from your regular cash plus a couple of dollars extra. This can be small enough to fit in a single pocket, perhaps even remaining "on body".

    Beyond that; pen, paper, small pocket tool, cellphone reserve power, compact poncho/umbrella. In city, your needs are much different than rural.

    Your EDC will change with you, often growing until you get sick of carrying it all and then cycling back to minimal. I like making it modular, easier to find items when you need them and easier to add/remove sections with the seasons.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900AZ using Tapatalk
     
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  5. landwire
    • In Omnia Paratus

    landwire Loaded Pockets

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    Step 1. Figure out the bag purpose (You got a great start on this)
    Step 2. Create a list of situations someone may encounter. Organize this list from the most likely to happen to the far stretch. (Again, great start)
    Step 3. Figure out what is necessary to address those situations.
    Step 4. Acquire the resources to complete step 3.
    Step 5. Field test, analyze results and field test again.
    Step 6. Tell us all about it.
    Step 7. Repeat, Repeat, Repeat.

    As it was mentioned earlier, what works for you, may not work for the next person. Anything you add to your bag, make sure you know how to use it. I don't carry a surgery field kit simply because of the fact that I don't know how to do surgery and the chances of running into someone who does at the time I need them is slim to none. I have some first aid knowledge and my kt has the items I know or have been trained to use.

    For some generalization type advice, I offer the following:

    Exact change for several of the common methods of public transit. I can't speak for everyone but the train tickets here don't work for bus tickets and vice versus. One or the other may not be functioning at the time. Have paper public transit schedules/maps of the above mentioned. Internet access may not be available and electronic devices may be drained. Also have a paper map of the areas you are likely to be in.

    Have cash for expected daily expenses in small bills and some change. In the event of a power outage, don't count on atms, debit/credit cards to work. More and more stores are getting some type of backup power, but I can't plan for every place that I need to have power. It would really stink to spend a $20 bill for a $1 bottle of water because you didn't have anything smaller and the store didn't have change.

    Flashlight, batteries for the light and/or the ability to recharge batteries and/or flashlight. Depending on the chosen light, I would also recommend a head strap for the flashlight so you can go hand free.

    A Buff. I used to be a fan of a handkerchief, but I switched over to a Buff for it multiple configuration uses.

    Several methods of starting a fire.

    A multitool of some sort.

    A collapsible water bottle and a water filtration system. Sawyer makes a great mini water filter that takes up little space.

    A side button poncho. You may be forced to camp overnight and a poncho can be used to make shelter.

    50' of utility/paracord type cordage.

    This is only a suggestion and that one must consider where they are, most likely to be at or most likely to encounter.

    Truer words have never been spoken in regards to the EDC life cycle.
     
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  6. bigant2984

    bigant2984 Loaded Pockets

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    Thank you so much for getting back to me


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  7. bigant2984

    bigant2984 Loaded Pockets

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    What a great post thank you I'll keep you guys updated


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  8. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    I really think an urban bag only needs money (cash) and a smartphone. Elements to support those items such as making sure you have a credit card and vending machine coinage along with more than one way to charge your phone are essential. I think a flashlight is a nice item, and since you're an urban commuter maybe some pepper spray and multitool if allowable in NYC.

    Going from there perhaps a bottle of water or a refillable container for fluids.

    If you're wanting to add on a survival kit or module well then there's plenty to list, but in reality what you will need on a walk home in a big city isn't likely to be what one would find in a typical wilderness survival kit. You might think of a small poncho or travel umbrella. A small collection of first aid supplies ranging from the typical daily necessities to actual trauma gear like an Israeli bandage, tourniquet, clotting sponge, chest seal, etc are things you might daydream about putting in your kit. With a pair of shoes already in there that's quite a bulky, heavy load.

    City map and small compass perhaps?
     
  9. bigant2984

    bigant2984 Loaded Pockets

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    So today when I left my office to pick up my car I had to walk about 5 blocks in light rain the bag held up pretty good but in a hard down pour the bag would be soaked


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

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    You will go through phases over time. You'll need to recognize and accept this. EDC is a 'living' thing, and is therefore constantly changing. There is no one 'static' solution. I mention this because it is often one of the phases people go through...the notion they can come up with that perfect EDC set up. The down side to this notion is it tends to do two things; it accumulates stuff in your EDC bag (or whatever), and it tends to cause you not to actually use your EDC (in that quest for the perfect set up). In my mind, EDC is different than survival although they are related. EDC is more about 'comfortable survival' in the real world, and not about taking every permutation of the apocalypse into account.

    If I were to offer some recommendations for someone just starting out it would be this...

    1. Resist the temptation to 'fill' your EDC bag. This can be hard at first. It's like an empty shelf, you need to find something to put on it (or think you do). Don't do it. Having some empty space in your bag is EDC in, and of, itself. You will accumulate things during the day, extra space will give you room to carry them somewhere other than in your hands.

    2. Unload / reload / cycle your EDC regularly. This will help with a couple things. First, it will help you know and remember what all is in your EDC bag. If you stuffed something in there and never use it, take it out. No sense in carrying something you don't use or are unlikely to ever reasonably need. Note: this is not intended to mean for example remove your FAK even though you don't use it daily, but rather you probably don't really need to be carrying that Geiger counter along with you every day, things like that. Just kidding about the Geiger counter, but I think you get the drift.

    3. Use the stuff you EDC. This seems like a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised how many people don't do this. If you carry some snacks, eat them, then put new ones in. If you carry a jacket, wear it before grabbing another one. Try to use every item in your EDC as frequently as possible, and make notes (mental if nothing else) about which items you don't use. If you never use it, take it out. No sense lugging around stuff you don't use (see #2). Conversely, if you're constantly missing something you took out, put it back in.

    4. The more functional your EDC the more likely you are to carry it with you always, and the more likely you are to use it. Translated; the less likely you are to leave it in your car, or at the house, or somewhere other than where you are. In short, never work for your EDC, always have your EDC work for you. It sounds like a simple concept, yet it can take many years to truly master, but that's the fun of it all. Over time you'll get better, and you'll feel better about it.

    A simple analogy, EDC is like your wallet. You don't leave the house without it because you're likely to need it. However, if your wallet weighed 45 lbs, and was so thick you couldn't sit down comfortably, you'd likely leave your wallet somewhere (home, etc.). Then you'd be screwed when you were hungry to buy lunch. EDC is much the same...it's 'Every Day'.

    Hope this helps.
     
  11. cricketofdeth

    cricketofdeth Empty Pockets

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    Some water and a snack are always good additions to a work based EDC.
    If you do a lot of walking, an emergency or disposable poncho is easy to carry and can be a life saver.
     
  12. Treya

    Treya Loaded Pockets

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    Apart from some of the items mentioed above such as torch, multitool, pain relief, boo boo kit, travel umbrella, etc, I also carry:
    • Travel pack of wet wipes.
    • Travel packet of tissues.
    • Empty folded up plastic bag (disposal of rubbish, cover bag in heavy rain, put wet umbrella in bag, carry extra items, etc).
    • A mini pack of tic tacs and/or pack of chewing gum.
    • An empty carabiner which has come in handy a few times with bag failure or needing to attach extra items on the go.
    • About a metre of black gaffer tape wrapped around an old gift card (also come in handy a few times).
    • Mini sewing kit from a hotel with a couple of safety pins.
    • A good set of tweezers.
    • Couple of antacid.
     
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  13. Vartz04

    Vartz04 Loaded Pockets

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    My suggestion is make it modular. Get organizational pouches. You can get cheap zipper cases or something like a maxped fatty. This way switching bags or switching for different types of activities is easy.
     
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  14. ballistic

    ballistic Loaded Pockets

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    +1 on modular approach with different sub-loads.

    Personal hygiene
    FAK
    Packable clothing depending on season, emergency space blanket
    Food/snacks
    Powerbank, chargers, cords
    Others as needed..

    A small waterproof pack cover in case you get caught in an extended downpour again, a small dry bag or Magpul DAKA pouch or 2 as waterproof containers for essential gear/electronics.
     
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