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Running shoes.

Discussion in 'EDC Clothing' started by Evilbunny, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    I need a new pair or running shoes. I would like to be able to use them to try to free run but I Can't spend Over $150 I want long lasting but not like anything like the five finger shoes those are not the best looking. Maybe ones that dry very quickly?
     
  2. temujin

    temujin Uber Prepared

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    Pretty confrontational language. Maybe you'd get some helpful replies if you rephrase your question?
     
  3. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    Sorry fixed.
     
  4. antonic

    antonic Loaded Pockets

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  5. JonM1911

    JonM1911 Loaded Pockets

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    So do looks make you run better? Just curious. I wear New Balance Minimus shoes while doing Crossfit and Krav as well as running. Been using them for about 3 months now about 2-3 times a week for an hour or two each time, they're holding up pretty well. They are based on the five fingers design or a minimal sole, but they are a full shoe. They also dry super fast b/c they're a lightweight, mesh upper.
    There are other colors if orange doesn't fit your workout style standard.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    Actually orange is my favorite color I try to have very thing orange. I will consider these thanks.
     
  7. Farchyld
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Farchyld Loaded Pockets

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    I use a pair of Nike Lunarglide 2's. They're very very light and comfortable. I immediately took to them and never looked back :) If you order from Nikes website you can pick most of the colors on the shoe which was cool.
     
  8. houdini28

    houdini28 Loaded Pockets

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    I wear Merrell Trail Gloves while running and lifting. It is a very similar shoe in form and function as the NB Minimus. There are several color schemes; I have a gray and yellow scheme which is subdued.
     
  9. Proforguns

    Proforguns Loaded Pockets

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    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]

    I run in Zoots
     
  10. JonM1911

    JonM1911 Loaded Pockets

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    Yea, I wanted them in orange b/c I thought they were cool lookin, but they were out :(. I love these things, might pick up another pair just to wear around.
     
  11. bnate

    bnate Loaded Pockets

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    Been watching this thread to see which direction it went. Some good suggestions here on some shoes to try...

    BUT, everyone has a different running gait, stride, need, etc. For instance, I have wide feet and found an Asics GT-2140 has worked best for me, otherwise narrow running shoes have a small toe box and hurt the toes. (you don't want black toenails just to be in a pretty shoe that looks neat). I trail run and workout on the treadmill, when work schedule dictates. You may run on concrete, trails, all weather tracks, scramble, etc. Your running preferences may change too, btw.

    [​IMG]

    I noticed you live in Fremont. I would suggest a place that can watch you run on a treadmill and fit a shoe to your running technique. Look one up near you....or there's place in Campbell that is really good. Owned by triathletes and kinesiologist. I have no affiliation with the store.

    http://www.runningrevolution.com/

    Good luck and happy running.
     
  12. Chiro75

    Chiro75 Loaded Pockets

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    If you're serious about your shoes, be ready to replace them frequently. The soles lose a lot of their shock absorption quicker than you realize.
     
  13. Roverrich

    Roverrich Loaded Pockets

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    I run, a lot. I tried "trail running" shoes and unless you are really running trails with strewn rocks that you need to protect your feet, I have found that good old fashion running shoes are more than adequate. If you go to a decent running specific store, tell them exactly what you are looking for and they will get you a great shoe. If they don't work for you, most running stores will allow you to trade them in for a new pair that may be a better fit. As stated, if you get serious, you're going to need to change out your shoes regularly, this gets expensive, but hey an injury is more expensive. How regularly you need to change them out depends on how much you weigh and how many mile you put on them. The better shoes eg: Asic Kayano's will last about 400miles in my experience before I need to change them out. I also run in the Vibram Five finger shoes and boy, if you want to improve your form, this is the best way. You can't run comfortably in them if you land hard on your feet or on your heel. Gotta run and land foot flat (like you're supposed to do anyhow.) Forget about how they look, the feel is awesome, closest thing to barefoot running. Probably best advice is to go to a good running store locally and get their advice, people who work in those type of stores are running fanatics and can you just what you need. Just my 2 cents, hope this helps.
     
  14. shrap

    shrap Loaded Pockets

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    Most running shoe technology is worthless and merely serves to help salespeople sell you the "right" kind of expensive shoe. I ran for years in a "support shoe" and did fine even though they watched me run on a treadmill and said I needed "neutral" shoes. I also ran about 400 miles in those shoes, and didn't notice anything horribly wrong. If you learn how to run in the right way, without relying on the shoe as a crutch, then more minimal shoes are better for you. The problem is that people rush into running too fast and get injured, and then spend time and money trying to fix their injury with shoes, when it's their body that needs to adapt to running.

    The most important thing is whether the shoe fits your foot - blisters, black toenails, and scrunched up toes are obvious problems.
     
  15. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    I also have wide feet. I run on concrete, dirt track, and grass. Most of the shoes I look at seem like they would slip on wet concrete or wet grass. From what I can tell I think I run like the normal section in that photo.
     
  16. pater

    pater Loaded Pockets

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    You would know if you under- or overpronate because your feet would hurt like hell in "neutral" shoes. I severaly overpronate and the only thing I found to fix my problem (and my constant sore feet) was to run either barefoot or in minimalist shoes. But everyone's mileage may vary.

    Also, everyone should be aware that the running technique in that picture is awful. Any good runner (marathan, triathlete, etc) will tell you never to heel strike. It's terrible on joints and the feet. The best place to strike is midfoot, right before the ball of the foot. It helps absorb a lot of the shock of the strike and allows for proper high-knee form.
     
  17. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    I didn't know that thanks.
     
  18. Soappeddler

    Soappeddler Loaded Pockets

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    bnate gives some very good advice. Go to a store that trains their employees to properly match the runner with a shoe. We are lucky to have such a store here. They will even let you exchange shoes that you have ran in a few times if they did not work well for you. Their prices may not be the lowest, but getting the right shoe will save you money in the long run. (pun intended)
     
  19. fatnewt

    fatnewt Loaded Pockets

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    Started running more a couple of years ago. The pain that was corrected by shoes providing more control for overpronation was actually in the outside of my knees. The right shoes eliminated the knee pain (first asics gel-evolution, now asics gt1150). Minimalist shoes offer hardly any cushion or support. You may want to transition to a minimalist shoe as you get into running and develop a routine. In my experience the shoes can definitely make a big difference & finding someone in a store that is knowledgeable and can guide you in your choice is a huge help.
     
  20. Swedish169

    Swedish169 Loaded Pockets

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    I always use New Balance. I don't stick with one model, but I find their whole lineup to be top quality and comfortable.

    the treads and leather parts of the shoe last extremely long, I had one pair that i trained for and ran 2 marathons in. the sole went hard before the treads wore out.

    if you get the breathing shoes, the tops will be made of thinner fabric that will rip and tear easy, but if you're just plain running than you should be fine. i had a breathing shoe that i wore to paintball in once, and later found the mesh fabric riddled with holes from sticks - that's fine, it's not designed for that, and overall i'd rather have a shoe the breaths to keep my feet cooler and dry out faster.

    also, if your feet are hurting and your arch support is correct, check your technique. a great shoe will delay the effects of poor technique, but eventually it will catch up with you. if you use proper form, you can feel great in any crappy shoe.