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Rescue Hooks/Blades in carry-on or checked?

Discussion in 'Travel' started by kirbysdl, Nov 4, 2008.

  1. kirbysdl
    • In Omnia Paratus

    kirbysdl Loaded Pockets

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    Can things like a Benchmade rescue hook or Res-Q-Me make it through security? Like all of these threads it probably depends on the particular TSA agent, but I'm looking for anecdotes. My Res-Q-Me's packaging claims that they're fine for going through airports, but who knows when that was printed... Thanks!
     
  2. bouncer

    bouncer Loaded Pockets

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    Wow,

    That's a tough one. Not on the TSA list., But I wouldn't chance it.
     
  3. Coaster

    Coaster Empty Pockets

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    I would guess the TSA goons would take one look at it and go "Ug that be knife, you put in bin!!"

    Maybe you could get through with a Res-Q-Me on a keychain. But I'd be prepared to lose that too.
     
  4. jenkinma

    jenkinma Loaded Pockets

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    On a recent trip to Europe, I changed my EDC a little to reflect TSA restrictions and the fact that I would be carrying on everything... so I purchased a Swiss-Tech Micro-Plus 8-in-1 tool (no blade) and hooked my keychain (which has a Res-q-me hanging on it) inside of my backpack... to be honest, I didn't even think about that blade in there... I was more worried about my scissors :rant:

    Oh well... it worked for me... out of ATL, into Newark, into Milan and back... no issues at all.
     
  5. OhCanada

    OhCanada Loaded Pockets

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    If I was working as security at an airport and you had something that could cut wires (thereby damaging the plane) I'd take it away from you. That would include seatbelt cutter type devices.
     
  6. kirbysdl
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    kirbysdl Loaded Pockets

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    Necro due to relevancy.

    After traveling through several US airports on multiple occasions with my RESQME attached to the outside of my Fatboy (i.e. on my carry-on), I had my first refusal in Oakland. It was flagged at Terminal 2 as a razor blade and I was told to exit the security line, dispose of the tool, and re-enter. There is a USPS drop box in Terminal 1, so I went over there. Just to check, I presented it and asked the TSA officials at Terminal 1 if I could take it aboard. I described it as an emergency seatbelt cutter. The TSA official there said "no way" so I mailed it home in my padded mailer that I EDC with me. I guess in the future I'll have to check it along with my knife, multitool, and other sharps, or face losing $2 for postage.

    Several hypotheticals:

    I wonder if it would have been flagged if it were an integrated one-piece item like a Benchmade 5 whose xray signature would not look like a razor blade. I suppose the argument could be made that the blade in the RESQME could be detached and used as a weapon, and therefore the entire tool should be denied, but it is unlikely that the same would be possible with the BM 5.

    I wonder if it would have gotten through at Terminal 1 (i.e. the second time) if I had not asked. CYA dictates that you always deny requests, as there is negligible risk in doing so (aside from risk to customer relations :rolleyes:).
     
  7. Kripto

    Kripto Evil Sid

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    Unfortunately, this be a slippery slope... As Macgyver taught us all, anything could be used for anything. :lolhammer:

    Generally, if its pointy I check it.. I've had TSA make me ditch the little knife in a Swiss Army Card from my wallet.. Cause obviously a 2in by 1/4in sharp is too dangerous to have on a plane.

    I wonder if they check for mercury thermometers, mercury oxidizes aluminum rapidly, which can cause catastrophic failure on a plane that is mostly made of aluminum. (granted you would need a lot.. cause the only device I know that has that much is a barometer which are indeed banned on planes (unless you're licensed with the national meteorological bureau)) :)
     
  8. jzmtl

    jzmtl Loaded Pockets

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    I know, old thread, but I sure hope this guy never does work in an airport, he'd yank everybody's teeth out before letting them on a plane.
     
  9. mercop

    mercop Empty Pockets

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    Don't carry anything that does not have an obvious use that "anyone" would be able to identify.
     
  10. lordhamster

    lordhamster Loaded Pockets

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    Because nobody will notice you opening access panels, getting waist deep into the plane and cutting stuff. Come on.
     
  11. kirbysdl
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    kirbysdl Loaded Pockets

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    Doug Ritter made a blog post about these things recently:

    http://www.equipped.org/blog/?p=115

    The email he mentions in his update was from me. :p

    Some other thoughts:

    I know that I could have made a complaint there, but according to the recommendations of EDCF I always have a padded mailer with me, and I opted to simply lose the $2 in postage rather than escalate the situation. If there wasn't a USPS drop box, I might have been more tempted to ask for a supervisor.

    I don't believe that the 4 inch blade provision he alluded to is relevant, as that applies solely to scissors. I would suggest a more appropriate provision regarding razors, which reads "Razor-Type Blades - such as box cutters, utility knives, razor blades not in a cartridge, but excluding safety razors." One could make the argument that the permanent housing of the Res-Q-Me around the blade turns it into a tool which is actually safer than a safety razor. Ultimately, it's not a zero tolerance policy, which is what the Oakland TSA employees seemed to think.

    Also, the scanners seem to work on one plane (geometrically speaking) only, so the positioning of your items affects the profile presented to the screener. In this case, the blade could be made to look more like a needle than a razor, and putting keys on top of it may further mask the x-ray signature. The point of doing this isn't to defeat the security theater or smuggle outright dangerous items on board, but to help prevent drama with items that should make it through anyway.

    Lastly, while I used to be able to find TSA-related verbiage on the Res-Q-Me site, they don't appear to mention that currently. Odd.
     
  12. G36pilot

    G36pilot Empty Pockets

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    Just looked up the Res-q-me tool and no this is not allowed.

    Unless an edged tool is specifically listed on the TSA website, expect an issue with it.

    Regrets

    PS A guillotine type cigar cutter I forgotten about raised a minor ruckus with a new screener because I was supposed to know better. Carry on tools can be broken down for the components. That's part of the issue.
     
  13. Elmo

    Elmo Loaded Pockets

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    don't take the chance and leave it at home.

    other options:
    • mail it to yourself at your destination address
    • buy one locally upon arrival. Thats what I do soon after landing. I buy a SAK
     
  14. acropolis5

    acropolis5 Loaded Pockets

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    Last summer my son flew from NYC to Isreal and back, with a Res-Q-Me in his carry-on backpack. It was questioned once by a screener, but his supervisor said it was OK.
     
  15. Clead

    Clead Loaded Pockets

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    I think the OP might be interested in having it on-person for the flight. I would want mine. Haven't bothered to buy one yet since I always have a couple saw-blade obsidian "souvenirs" that could be used to cut a belt in an emergency. :-X
     
  16. bpa

    bpa Loaded Pockets

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    Could someone please explain to me how a rescue hook would be better than simply opening the seatbelt buckle? The airplane buckles are very easy to open, and it might very well take more time and effort to reach a rescue tool than simply to open the buckle.
     
  17. kirbysdl
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    kirbysdl Loaded Pockets

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    Yeah, I agree. Rescue hooks are usually used to cut apart straps when the buckling mechanism is inaccessible or jammed. It seems that the centrally located buckle on airplane belts, combined with their heavier construction, renders such tools largely unnecessary. The reason why I want it on me versus checked luggage is mostly because (1) there's no reason not to, aside from security theater and (2) it's just easier to travel without having to shift your gear around.