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Recommendation on premade, ready to go FAK

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by jjk454ss, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    I thought I'd find a thread for this, maybe a sticky even. What's a good recommendation on a good quality, good price, good size FAK? Something to start with even if I need to add a little to it! Hoping for nice case, easy to access without making a mess of everything to get one bandaid out, fairly or totally complete.
     
  2. cory leonard

    cory leonard Empty Pockets

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    I too am very interested in this! Was wondering if a pre-made kit was out there or if a maxped pouch and pieces added were better?


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  3. RAMBOCAT

    RAMBOCAT Loaded Pockets

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    It has been my personal experience, that pre-made kits will only be missing that one thing that only you need. For this very reason, I'm a big fan of making your own PERSONAL kit. One thing missing from most kits is a small 10x mirror. You will be in total misery if you are alone and get something in your eye. I learned this 45 years ago on mission where I was alone and about 25 klicks from help.
     
  4. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    There's got to be a kit to start with, even if it's the basics. If not, where's the best list of must haves?
     
  5. Daniel T

    Daniel T Loaded Pockets

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    Lifesystems (Available on Amazon on many other places) are a great place to start. Good kits in good cases. They do a variety of options, I have found 'Trek' to be a good EDC option.

    Dan
     
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  6. hawkeye-

    hawkeye- Loaded Pockets

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    There is no magical "one kit," it really depends what you're going to use it for. The pieces I carry ON me, vs what I carry in my car, all differ. Situationally, my FAK load out can vary, too. Am I working? Do I have my child with me? Have there been viable threats at work that would force me to consider carrying additional kit? For example, at work I carry a RAT tourniquet, two doses of Quik clot, an Asherman seal, an abdo pad, and spongebob bandaids. In my car is an Alberta number III kit with various enhancements; CAT's, Quick clot, Asherman seals, and a wool blanket. I think what I'm trying to say is don't stick with "one kit," have multiple. Have backups. If you're carrying a serious kit, recertify, train, and keep changing it. Just my two cents.
     
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  7. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    I'll check them out, thanks
     
  8. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    I think knowing what I'll need a first aid kit for ahead of time would be nice, then maybe I can avoid needing it:). But really I want a complete kit to keep in my bag, not carried on hikes or anything, just to have available. Even if I don't know how to use somethings in it, I figure having it is a start if someone needs it.
     
  9. Leemann

    Leemann Loaded Pockets

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    Here's 2 more Rescue essentials and adventure medical kits.
     
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  10. bob_the_bomb

    bob_the_bomb Loaded Pockets

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    Actually Hawkeye has a valid point. If you are likely to be somewhere a bit 'kinetic' you are likely to want things like Quikclot/Celox, Israeli bandages and a CAT tourniquet. These might be less useful than a SAM splint if you are going hiking. Even a first aid kit in the kitchen (burns) might be a little different than the shed (power tools). Do you want this kit to live in the car (weight and volume no object) or carry it on an ultralight hike? (Every gram counts). Do you need a set of sterile needles to take to some dodgy country? An emergency dental kit for a long distance wilderness trail? An individual first aid kit (IFAK) for work in some place where you might get blown up? A kit that will be excellent in one of those scenarios might be useless in another. So first thing: decide the role for each first aid kit. 2. Get a formal first aid course under your belt. Look at the AMK or life systems kits and choose the one(s) most fit-for-role. Add extras to need/taste. Regularly review contents and check for shelf lives. Of these, the training is the most important. I've given first aid training to a closed compound leg fracture using nothing more than a shemagh and a bottle of water...


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  11. AK47Uprising

    AK47Uprising Loaded Pockets

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    North American Rescue and Rescue Essentials are the only two I will ever recommend. Good product dates, excellent customer service, and quality products. It's money well spent; I started with a premade from NAR and added to it; it cost a bit more but I got great dates and a thigh bag that has held up to a fair amount of abuse and looks brand new.

    NAR are more serious, tactically oriented kits, while Rescue Essentials covers pretty much the whole spectrum and also sells empty bags and products separately.

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  12. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks, I'll check them out
     
  13. Craig Grabowsky

    Craig Grabowsky Loaded Pockets

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    If your set on a pre-made kit than you have to think static or dynamic. Is it for general purpose around the house/office/shop in which case go to Grainger's website; or is it for outdoor hiking/biking/outdoor encounters in which case any of the outdoor stores have multiple choices.


    REI has a "ask the experts" section that I couldn't link to but they give good advice on choosing a first aid kit.
     
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  14. AV8R

    AV8R Loaded Pockets

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    Dark Angel
     
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  15. emergency_ram12

    emergency_ram12 Empty Pockets

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    There are 2 kits from Skinny Medic (YouTuber) that I bought and I carry everyday. I did have to make a few adjustments (swapping out the cheap band-aids for waterproof type band-aids) I also added a few other minor things that I saw fit but this kit has everything you need at a decent price.

    This first kit I carry on my backpack everyday. It is really nice and rugged plus offers a wide range of options to be able to add on to. [​IMG]

    The second kit I carry in my truck. It has the same as the first but is more of a shoulder carry type bag and fits nicely under the seat of my truck. [​IMG]

    Google SkinnyMedic
     
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  16. jjk454ss

    jjk454ss Loaded Pockets

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    I like those, exactly what I had in mind. Thank you.
     
  17. AlleyKat

    AlleyKat Loaded Pockets

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    I have a couple of medium sized kits I keep in either my EDC pack (5.11 Rush 24) or in my car. I supplied these myself based on my needs and various posts here and on other sites. [​IMG]

    Above is a kit I got from Coyote Tactical Solutions. I follow them on Instagram and watched them create and develop this kit. Pretty neat and compact, USA made, great quality and customer service. I've got them working on a custom build for me right now, a small 3x5 pouch to hold PPE in the lower pocket of my ACU trousers.

    But I digress...

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    This little guy is a Condor First Response kit I carry in my deployment bag (5.11 Rush 12). It comes with molle straps so I can attach it to the outside of the bag or to a tactical vest. Those tins are repurposed Thrunite Ti3 tins which hold common meds in small ziplock baggies. This kit is just the basics.

    I prefer to build my own kits, particular to my needs; for example, I'm allergic to adhesive so I tend to use a lot of gauze (flat or rolled) when I get injured. I carry tape to secure the gauze to itself, but it can't touch my skin. I keep things to help others in a much larger kit that goes in my car. There is no end to the thousands of ways to configure a kit. You will discover what you need and what you don't depending on the situation.

    Happy hunting!


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  18. Ram Man

    Ram Man Loaded Pockets

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    This got me thinking. Son is at trade school to be a bricklayer (EDC Forums helped me pick a multi tool for him), and maybe he should have a FAK in his tool box. More reading to do!
     
  19. Canuck_Prepper

    Canuck_Prepper Loaded Pockets

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    I'm not a first aid expert like some of you...but in my very humble opinion I'm a huge fan also of designing your own. I went through this exercise last year and not only did I build my kit according to my needs but I learned a WHOLE lot in the process. My primary kit is the tear away Condor med pack. Researching and deciding on each and every piece of gear gives you a tremendous degree of familiarity with the contents... not only where in the kit each item is, but what it does, its limitations etc.
     
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  20. Kilted1

    Kilted1 Loaded Pockets

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    It's a pretty open ended question. You can start with a pocket size boo-boo kit for ten dollars and work up from there to a full trauma / blowout kit that requires it's own truck to tote around.

    Coleman makes a couple kits that are pretty nice and affordable packaged in an altoids like tin. Adventure Medical Kits (AMK) offers very well put together kits for reasonable prices. They cover everything from a personal pocket FAK to big base camp trauma packs. I like the AMK kits, they're put together by experts and leave out the tiny dot bandages and other junk that mostly serve to get the piece count up.

    Part of choosing a kit is evaluating your lifestyle/environment and thinking about what types of injuries you and those around you are most likely to sustain.

    Training, training, training! All the gear in the world is useless if you don't know what to do with it. Sure, there's a chance that someone else might happen along with more training than you. But a basic first aid and CPR class is entirely worth while. If you can't find, get to, or afford a class, at least make the effort to watch some YouTube videos. It can't replace hands on training but there's absolutely no reason these days to go around without basic knowledge.
     
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