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RCR123A and with CR123A ?

Discussion in 'Flashlights & Other Illumination Devices' started by Blacksaigon, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. Blacksaigon

    Blacksaigon Loaded Pockets

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    guys,

    what is the different between RCR123A and with CR123A ?
     
    AK Adventurer likes this.
  2. moshow9

    moshow9 Loaded Pockets

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    CR123A's are primary lithium batteries, good for one-time use. RCR123's (also known as 16340's) are the CR123A's rechargeable counterpart. Something to keep in mind is that RCR123's come in different flavors (3.0v vs 3.7v, as well as different chemistries: IMR, LiCo, Life4po) and not all flashlights that accept a CR123A can officially support a 3.7v RCR123.

    Knowledge and precautions are needed when using RCR123's as well.
     
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  3. Blacksaigon

    Blacksaigon Loaded Pockets

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    thank you mate,

    I've found a flashlight called jetbeam pc10 and pa10. pc10 offer cr123 but when you want to use turbo mode you have to use RCR123A. and is that mean the battery need to support 3.7v or 3.0v is good to go ?
     
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  4. Blerv

    Blerv Loaded Pockets

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    Most lights that take a cr123 will take a rcr123 but it will overdrive it due to the higher voltage. It's always best to check because 4.2v is a big jump from 3v. Don't expect much runtime and use it in short busts on high. Hold it in hand so it heat-sinks better.

    Also, depending on the light I would use an IMR16340. They can easily take over 3 amps where an rcr123 shouldn't go much over 1.5 amps (fairly common with EDC lights).
     
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  5. Dr Jekell
    • Administrator
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Dr Jekell I had fun once, It was awful.
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    CR123A - Primary battery (disposable) with an approx 3.0v normal voltage
    RCR123A - Rechargeable Lithium Ion battery with an approx 4.2v normal voltage

    CR123A batteries should be brought from a reputable vendor (best brought online & in bulk) and be from one of the reputable Mfg (Surefire, Energizer, Duracell, Battery Station) so you can be sure that you are getting genuine cells with functioning safety devices.

    Using counterfeit batteries, damaged batteries or batteries with differing voltages (in two or more cell lights) can cause venting with flame &/or explosion.

    RCR123A batteries come in several different types & should be treated with a lot of respect (but not feared) as these can contain a lot of energy.

    Protected - has circuitry designed to prevent over charging and over discharging which makes them safer than unprotected and more suited to beginners.

    Unprotected - This is just the bare cell with no safeguards, these are best left to the experts as making a wrong move with these will cause venting with fire, explosion, possible injury &/or death.

    3V restricted - These batteries have a circuit in them to reduce the voltage from the battery to approx 3.0v to replicate a CR123A primary for use in lights that are primary battery only, the quality of these types of cells can vary wildly depending on the Mfg, and not all lights will play well with these cells so caution is advised when selecting & using these types of cells.

    Chemistry types - There are a number of different chemistry types (IMR, LiCo, Life4po, etc) each with their own pro's & con's.

    It is recommended that RCR123's and other Li-ion batteries only be used in lights that the Mfg has specified are compatible with Li-ion batteries, for safeties sake and so you don't risk letting the magic smoke out of your nice new light (and will void most Mfg's warranties).

    I would only use a RCR123A battery in a single cell light, if you are going to be using them in a two cell light it would be better to step up to 18650 cells.

    As for the Jetbeam PC10 light you can use either a (quality) CR123A battery (this will usually give you longer run time but lower lumen output, as well as having a 10 year shelf life which is good if the light is not going to be used much) or a RCR123A Li-ion battery (go this route if you will be using the light on a regular basis, and it will give you more lumens at the expense of run time).

    If the light will be used for EDC you could have a RCR123A in the light and then have a back up CR123A battery in a battery capsule (like the Going Gear Numyth Talos Waterproof Lithium Battery Capsule) which would give you the best of both worlds.

    Right enough of my ramblings. If you in need of more in depth info, have a look around the Candlepower Forums.
     
  6. labrador72

    labrador72 Loaded Pockets

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    The PC10 takes the RCR123 Li-on 3.7V. The PA10 you need to use a 14500 Lio-on to get turbo but lose all other modes. They have a defective UI, unless JetBeam fix it recently: for the same price you can get better lights.
     
  7. Kilted1

    Kilted1 Loaded Pockets

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    It's worth mentioning here that our dauntless leader, Jon invented the RCR123A.
     
    Roger likes this.