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Rate my Family EDC FAK

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by SureShot, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. TangoAlpha

    TangoAlpha Loaded Pockets

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    Look for competing brands that are less expensive. Celox is a competitor of Quickclot and while its somewhat pricey; if you have a gunshot wound you won't be complaining. Dermabond also has competing brands that are a little less expensive, but in a pinch you can use superglue. It was first developed for medical use anyway. The other alternative is going to a veterinarian/ farm supply. Most people overlook this but farm supply places are a good source of antibiotics, med supplies, and I also purchase zeolite and charcoal for water filtration etc.
     
  2. bushy.243

    bushy.243 Loaded Pockets

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    Like many others have already stated I would definitely add some emergency blankets and some BPC Dressings.
     
  3. VinnyP
    • In Omnia Paratus

    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    Hospital tampons for nose bleeds are the same in name only they look nothing like a feminine hygiene tampon (flat for a start). The military (well NATO I don't know about the rest of the world) don't use tampons for gunshots. Again tampon has largely come to mean the feminine hygiene product (even though it was a much later use of the name) but the ones for wounds etc. are different design with a different ethos feminine hygiene Tampons are not for stopping bleeding they are for absorbing blood not promoting clotting.
     
  4. VinnyP
    • In Omnia Paratus

    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    Just an urban myth it was developed for gun sights. It was much later tested for medical use and found to be a bad idea, that's why dermabond (which is a different composition) was developed.
     
  5. nemoaz

    nemoaz Loaded Pockets

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    Vinny, tampons are made of cotton. Bandages are made of cotton. I don't know what ethos you are talking about. They work and work well. They are cheap and readily available. If you don't want them on your ambulance, don't use them. For a non-medical person, they are a very good item to have and stockpile.

    The cotton also makes a great firestarter. There's tons of it in that very small container.
     
  6. madkins007

    madkins007 Loaded Pockets

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    As an EDC kit, which in my mind means always within reach, this seems like a lot of overkill. Plus- I really don't recommend carrying that many meds as a general rule of thumb.

    Specific notes:
    - Tourniquet. I can make one with other stuff I have and will almost never need it anyway unless I live/work near unusually hazardous situations.
    - Burn cream. Toss it, the stuff in kits is not useful in the early stages of the burn and there is better stuff for the later stages.
    - Most of the meds. Most of this stuff does not do well in a kit- it breaks down, etc. when it is not kept cool and dry. Most of it is not needed in a real hurry anyway, so why not leave it at home or stop by a store when you need it? Pre-packaged adult and child painkillers are an exception.
    - Spray Neosporin is bulky and not very useful overall. Packaged cleaning pads might be a better, smaller, and more stable option.
    - Ace bandage is another big bulky thing that you rarely need in a hurry and can 'make do' with other options.
    - Eye pads- these are actually a great idea! An eye pad and some 2" 'Microfoam' tape can do a LOT of jobs- eyes, moderate wounds, blisters, etc. They are a 'secret weapon' in Cliff Jacob's book 'Camping Secrets'.
    - As others have mentioned, consider adding a space blanket as well as something like a LARGE bandana.

    Red Cross class- did you know they offer 'Blended Learning' in many areas- take most of the class on-line and attend a short class to practice the hands-on skills? Also, I personally like the National Safety Council's first aid program better than the fairly simplistic Red Cross version. (Both do fine with CPR and AED training.)

    If you are taking the EMT class for general preparedness, you might want to think about either a First Responder or Wilderness First Aid class instead. EMT classes assume a lot of things that may not be true for you- mostly a well-stocked ambulance, a trained partner, radio contact with experts, and a nearby hospital. FR and WFA classes are usually better at preparing you to deal with stuff with more limited resources.

    (Red Cross and Safety Council instructor, first-aid nerd, and way-expired EMT)
     
  7. Doc.Josh

    Doc.Josh Empty Pockets

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    Always include a small mirror. It's incredibly difficult to treat a wound that you can see (face or head) if you are alone. Also, I've found that people are often disconcerted by wounds they can't see so even if you are treating someone else, they may feel better if they can check the wound and see how you patched them up after.
     
    nightowl and keeper like this.
  8. medicevans

    medicevans Loaded Pockets

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    Kid friendly medications, like was previously stated. APAP and Motrin.

    Also, once you get your CPR cert, you'll know you don't need a face shield. Want me to sum up the lay person CPR class?

    1. Push hard. In the center of the chest
    2. Push fast. 120 bpm
    3. Don't stop until EMS gets there. Switch rescuers if you have to keep the depth and bpm up.

    That's it. I do say go on and get your EMT-B though. You'll learn a lot. I think everyone should get it.
     
  9. VinnyP
    • In Omnia Paratus

    VinnyP Loaded Pockets

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    What Lay class? Lay means untrained, that is what you get from a video class or what the emergency telephone operator will tell people to do. People trained in CPR should also do breaths at a ratio of 30:2. That is the current teaching of the American hear foundation, the international and European Resus council. There were some promising results for Compression only for a while but they realised that was because it gave better compressions with minimal interruptions, which are the most important thing, the latest data is that high quality compressions AND breaths gives the highest survival rates.
     
  10. The British Are Coming

    The British Are Coming Loaded Pockets

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    I really don't like the obsession with antibiotic ointments, studies have linked them to the growth of MRSA and other drug resistant pathogens. Such things shouldn't be being used by laymen.
     
  11. medicevans

    medicevans Loaded Pockets

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    Vinny, I don't want to start a pissing match with you. Here is what I'm talking about.

    http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/CPRAndECC/HandsOnlyCPR/Hands-Only-CPR_UCM_440559_SubHomePage.jsp

    I misspoke when I said lay class. I combined two things in my head and it came out as one. Trained in CPR is absolutely 30:2.

    However.......you know just as well as I do that keeping a perusing blood pressure is one of the goals of CPR. When you interrupt compressions to give those two breaths, bp drops and it takes several compressions to raise it again. High quality compressions, and breaths given without interrupting compressions equal greatest outcome to survival.

    My opinion, and what I'd do if I were alone and performing CPR, even with a face shield, is that I would do compressions only. Uninterrupted compressions are more important than the breaths, given a short eta by ALS, and short time to defib.

    Also Vinny, you might find this interesting. I've been doing some con-ed and this is one of the studies I've been reading. It's interesting.
    http://m.paems.org/pdfs/online-ce/Immediate-Defibrillation-or-Defibrillation-after-CPR.pdf

    Really, CPR is great, but in most circumstances it only buys time for the medics to get there and defib.
     
  12. tower
    • In Omnia Paratus

    tower Loaded Pockets

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    That is very true, depending upon your definition of "great". The truth is that , overall, 90 to 95% of the patients upon whom one performs CPR will not survive. I personally would not call that great, but I will concede that it is the best (or only) possibility for survival that patient has.

    [​IMG]

    ROSC = Return of Sponaneous Circulation
     
  13. medic2807

    medic2807 Loaded Pockets

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    I've done CPR hundreds of times in my career, and the newest iteration of the science from American Heart is the best so far-pump fast and hard and 2 min of compressions before defibrillation. If I had a dollar for every time i shocked an inadequately compressed (oxygenated) heart from v-fib to asystole I could buy a cheap spydeco.This, combined with the use of an impedence threshold device like ResQPod and early defibrillation have improved my stats from "never" to "sometimes". Lets put it this way-I had 2 code saves in the first 15 years of my career. I've probably had 5 with the new science. To me, a save is an out of hospital discharge and not eating baby food for the rest of your life.

    That being said, my number of patients who linger in the ICU for 2 months and end up in the nursing home has increased as well. Like Patton Oswalt says: "Science-we're all about coulda, not shoulda!"

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2
     
  14. medicevans

    medicevans Loaded Pockets

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    Very true. "Great" is relative. I've had 8 field saves (true saves, survival one month, neuro intact) so far in my career as a medic. They were, without exception, either witnessed arrests by EMS, or defib within 5 minutes because we were so close.

    I think we can all agree that it's not what you have, it's what you know. Knowledge goes a long way, and knowledge is always with you.
     
    sungame likes this.