1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Rate my Family EDC FAK

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by SureShot, Jan 6, 2013.

  1. SureShot

    SureShot Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    2
    Starting this year it is my goal to complete the Red Cross First Aid/CPR class in January and then get my EMT-B certification by the end of the year.

    This is my first time putting this together, but I have the Condor EMT Pouch seen here: Amazon
    attached to my Maxpedition Sitka. Please be critical, but keep in mind this is for my Wife, 2 Kids(8 months and 4 yr) and Myself.

    [​IMG]

    Starting at the top left. Skipping some of the self explanatory items.

    1. Israeli tourniquet
    2. Large BandAid
    3. x8 Regular band aid with antibiotic ointment
    4. Hand Wipes
    5. Sterile ABD Pad 5in x 9in
    6. x10 Waterproof Spiderman Band-Aids
    7. Gauze
    8. Nitrile Gloves
    9. Butterfly bandage
    10. 70% Alcohol Wipes
    11. Eye Pad
    12. x2 Tums
    13. Aspirin 325mg
    14. Tylenol 500mg
    15. Migraine Medication (Inside straw)
    15. Antibiotic Ointment
    16. Sudafed 12 hour
    17. Insect Itch relief
    18. Burn Cream
    19. Roll of Gauze
    20. Ace Bandage
    21. Zofran (for Nausea)
    22. Meclizine (Motion Sickness)
    23. Spray Neosporin
    24. Qtips
    25. Large roll of Gauze
     
  2. mooshi
    • In Omnia Paratus

    mooshi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    5,565
    Likes Received:
    13,421
    I'll add more if/when I think of anything.

    But how about more kid-friendly medication? Those are awfully high dosages should something happen to your kids.
     
    sungame and MedicInTraining like this.
  3. MedicInTraining
    • In Omnia Paratus

    MedicInTraining Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2012
    Messages:
    689
    Likes Received:
    650
    I would suggest maybe a few more gauze pads and maybe another ACE Bandage and a triangular bandage? Assuming if this is to stay at home? Maybe an instant ice pack if you're taking it to sports or your children are accident prone?

    If it's an outdoor kit- perhaps a thermal/mylar blanket or two.

    Once you get CPR Certified get a disposable CPR faceshield to throw in here.
     
  4. keeper
    • In Omnia Paratus

    keeper Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    753
    Likes Received:
    782
    trauma scissors. hemostat, tweezers, nail clippers. more regular bandaids, 2X2 gauze pad, 4X4 gauze pad, Coban, saline bullets I think you have a good start, and as you take your training, ideas will come to you, of things to remove from your kit and extra things to add. Remember to pack your kit so you know where things are, and that you know how to use the items you pack. Nice to have you here on the forum, and good luck with your training.
     
  5. zombieslayer001

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,172
    Likes Received:
    712
    Immodium, gas relief,
     
  6. tower
    • In Omnia Paratus

    tower Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    4,591
    Likes Received:
    3,753
    If its for you wife too, how about sanitary napkins/tampons, PMS med's.
     
    Erasergirl likes this.
  7. tinker gnome
    • In Omnia Paratus

    tinker gnome Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2010
    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    373
    Personally I would add a small headlamp, like a Zebralight or Spark, preferably with lithium cells (for longtime storage)
     
    Erasergirl and SurvivePenna like this.
  8. BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel

    BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    202
    Different size SAM Splints maybe.
    If you or your family are prone to sporting accidents you may want to add them.

    Came in handy for me a number of times but YMMV.

    I would also add a pair of Lister scissors and a cutting tool for clothes (Gerber Strapcutter for example).
    Iodine-based disinfectant (less stinging than alcohol swabs), a pair of pointed tweezers, blister pads & mole skin can also save your day or that of someone else.

    I also carry a box of foam ear plugs in my FAK (and have already helped people out with some)
     
    Erasergirl likes this.
  9. FrozenMuffin

    FrozenMuffin Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2012
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    167
    Add a light of some sort. These are fantastic FAK lights. They fit well into MOLLE or PALS webbing and you can hold them in your mouth easy enough. I always opt for a flashlight over a headlamp, they take up less room and they're more precise.
    Since you have young kids, I would say lower dose meds would be important, a thermometer (I think I see one in your picture but I don't see it listed) and stuff to treat scraped knees and elbows.

    Other than that it looks like a pretty good kit.
     
  10. KMoN

    KMoN Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    I like steri-strips in addition to the many things Keeper already mentioned.
     
  11. Erasergirl

    Erasergirl Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2013
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    359
  12. littlequick
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner
    • In Omnia Paratus

    littlequick EDC junkie

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2012
    Messages:
    506
    Likes Received:
    3,361
    Don't use a tampon for anything but normal usage.
     
  13. BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel

    BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    202
    I can confirm from my own experience that tampons are extremely effective against nosebleed.

    It looks quite stupid, though.

    Speaking if which - you have your vitals covered as well when hemorrhaging from the nose: as long as the little blue ribbon moves you're good.

    --
    Sent from a Marconi wireless using Morse Code.
     
  14. Erasergirl

    Erasergirl Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2013
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    359
    are you speaking from experience?:p



    I think i see scissors in the image, but i can't tell what they are.
    I recommend bandage scissors and hemostat/forceps..
    if you are trying to sew a small wound even with the nytrile gloves things get slippery.
     
  15. tower
    • In Omnia Paratus

    tower Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Messages:
    4,591
    Likes Received:
    3,753
    Tincture of benzoin makes steri strips very effective if you don't plan on suturing.
     
    keeper likes this.
  16. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2012
    Messages:
    3,211
    Likes Received:
    7,306
    As a layman with only the Red Cross First Aid/CPR class and the first aid training from my scouting years, I think this looks pretty good.

    I have to agree that you should probably add some painkillers and other medication in more child friendly dosages. Other than that, I have only one simple suggestion: How many pairs of gloves are there in your kit? Since it's a family kit, I think you should have at least two pairs, one for you and one for your wife. An extra pair wouldn't hurt either.
     
  17. nemoaz

    nemoaz Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    17
    It's hard to make recommendations without knowing more. My kit might change depending on where I was (climate, location urban/rural) and any particular medical problems you might have.

    Personally, I don't carry a fak as every day carry. EDC to me is in my pocket. I'd look pretty strange carrying a pack around everywhere. Or two if this is just one of your EDC.

    I don't carry bandaids or anything smaller than 4x4s. Big bandages can be cut to make a small bandaid (with some tape) but little bandaids aren't worth anything for large wounds. Triangular bandages (or clean bandanas) are quite useful.

    I don't close (steritrips sutures etc) anything in the field and you shouldn't either unless you've received real training (medical school or military--- not youtube or Rambo) on how to do it. There's a reason that the medics and even the ER docs often won't close a wound.

    I do sometimes carry tampons. They are great for their normal useage: stopping bleeding. We used them for nosebleeds in the hospital. The military uses them for gunshots.

    I prefer iodine as an antiseptic. It can also purify water. I like dual use.

    When I splint a finger, I splint it to the next finger usually with tape.

    Remember that your antibiotic is primarily petroleum jelly and your tampons or bandages make great fire kit.
     
  18. stevem174

    stevem174 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    1
    I like to have levels and a modular system.

    First It's hard to have too many gloves. I try to have several pair in my kits. They protect me from your blood but they also protect you from anything that I have on my hands, as I might not have time to wash them prior to treating you.

    When I think of levels, I have a boo boo kit, mid level and a trauma kit.

    Do an assessment of your personal needs. What are your most common injuries and illnesses? In your case, because of the kids and level of training, I would expect you to commonly treat the dreaded trauma of knee and elbow scrapes. A Batman or Barbie band-aid can kill pain faster than morphine. :)
     
  19. TangoAlpha

    TangoAlpha Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    277
    My general FAK looks like yours for the most part with the exception that I carry a Quickclot pack. It works better than anything else I've tried to stop bleeding. I don't use it for the minor stuff but recently used it for someone who was under a car bleeding profusely from their head. And I carry medical superglue to be used in place of stitches when needed. I used it to patch up a buddy needing stitches who was lacking health insurance. It healed without major scarring and saved him an E.R. visit.
     
  20. BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel

    BravoOscarFoxtrotHotel Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2011
    Messages:
    328
    Likes Received:
    202
    Are you talking Dermabond or something like that?

    Looked into it once and found it too expensive :eek:


    --
    Sent from a Marconi wireless using Morse code