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Question regarding waxing canvas/cotton

Discussion in 'Do-It-Yourself & Gear Modifications' started by waldamir, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    I had purchased a cotton jacket from bass pro on black Friday with the intention of making myself a shell layer to protect myself from the wind an rain during colder months.

    Ive seen a lot of recipes online using beeswax, boiled linseed oil and turpentine. I have a lot of beeswax lying around and I was wondering what is the purpose of using other chemicals?

    Im trying to keep cost as low as possible and avoid wearing a toxic candle so if anyone else has done this before I would be very grateful if they could offer up some wisdom.

    Thank you
     
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  2. Nick4305
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    Nick4305 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    If my memory doesn't fail MangeD700 did a similar work on a pair of trousers some time ago... May be he could be of help.
     
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  3. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    Hopefully he will chime in. I'd like to hear the opinions of many.

    Thank you for your response
     
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  4. MangeD700
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    MangeD700 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Well, my Fjällräven Vidda Pro trousers is made out of "G-1000" which is 65% polyester and 35% cotton.
    I use Greenland Wax, a cube of wax that can be bought at Fjällräven shops.
    I rub them in once and use a hairdryer to get it to melt in to the fabric. On areas that gets alot of wear, like shoulders and elbows, i rub once more to make it withstand some more moisture.



    Sent from my S6 Edge+
     
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  5. MangeD700
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    MangeD700 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Sent from my S6 Edge+
     
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  6. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    Thank you for the input. I've looked into the greenland wax however I'm looking for a homemade waxing recipe. Like I said above I have a lot of beeswax laying around.

    Would it be possible to use only the beeswax, and nothing else added to it?
     
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  7. MangeD700
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    MangeD700 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I haven't a clue about that. It feels like a 50/50 chance you'll lit as a candle when drying at a fire....

    Sent from my S6 Edge+
     
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  8. 16VGTIDave

    16VGTIDave Loaded Pockets

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    I've been considering something similar. As I understand, the Greenland Wax is a blend of paraffin wax (like used in canning), bees wax, and mineral oil. The different waxes have different melting points and the mineral oil helps soften the mixture and make it easier to apply. I've read of mixtures from 40/40/20 to 80/19/1.

    I don't know what the perfect ratio will be, but one of these days I'm going to try mixing up something like 70/25/5 and see how it works.

    Dave
     
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  9. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    I've been looking for a all natural recipe. I tried waxing (with just beeswax)a little canvas ditty bag I had made some time ago and it turned out ok. I would definitely say it wll keep water but I don't know how much or for how long.
     
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  10. elduderino

    elduderino Loaded Pockets

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    I've done this and after much consideration decided against the boiled Linseed oil, because it stinks. I used half beeswax, half paraffin wax (from old candles). Melted together in a bain marie (aka double broiler I think). Let it set, rub it on, used a heat gun to melt in to cotton.

    Observations and recommendations:
    Get a paint brush and apply straight from the bain marie - getting hard wax into the seams wasn't easy. You'll probably still need a hair drier/heat gun to melt it in.
    The jacket I did this on was, in hindsight, a bit coarsely woven. I applied three layers because of this. It works as a repellent, but also has a waxy feel. More than any waxed jacket I've ever encountered and has a waxy smell.
    Would I do it again?

    I've got some photos on instagram (cpdennett) dont want to post an outside link.

    C
     
  11. Jonb74

    Jonb74 Loaded Pockets

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    I tried waxing a Rothco cotton/canvas-ish messenger bag using beeswax and parafin. I used a double boiler set up and painted it on, then used a hair dryer to melt it in. Hindsight observations: I used too much and it made the bag really stiff. It did repel water very well, but I ended up throwing the bag away. Wouldn't do it again. Instead I would buy a can of the spray on silicon based stuff and call it good (ie Camp Dry). Less messy, less lingering smell, doesn't make the fabric stiff, doesn't rub off on clothing, etc.
     
  12. tattoosteve99
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    tattoosteve99 EDC Junkie!!!

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    The reasons some used boiled linseed oil is because it was a tried and true method many years ago. I still use a similar method on my old canvas tent. Turpentine and bees wax is what I use. Yes it does stink and is flammable, but after it sets for awhile the flammability goes down. Cotton is flammable anyway. Adding just wax makes it more so. So just find something that works for you.
     
  13. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    So let me see if I got this straight. Linseed oil, turpentine and beeswax is just what people used to do because it worked.

    Just using beeswax alone will work just fine but be more flammable

    forgive me if I'm not understanding this right

    I'm on a limited budget and have A LOT of beeswax laying around, so if it is possible to achieve the same thing as beeswax and linseed oil or beeswax and turps (or a combination of the two) with just beeswax then I'd like to do that as long as I'm not going to look at a fire funny and burst into flames
     
  14. tattoosteve99
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    tattoosteve99 EDC Junkie!!!

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    The oil or turpentine is used to make it thinner so it soaks in more and also keeps it from being too thick. Wax itself will work just go slow and take your time. I believe linseed oil also helps preserve the fabric from rot too
     
  15. waldamir

    waldamir Loaded Pockets

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    If I were to use just the beeswax should I just melt it down and use a paint brush to paint it on while it's still liquid and then use a heat gun to melt it in? Or just rub it on straight from the block and then use the heat gun to melt it in?
     
  16. Jonb74

    Jonb74 Loaded Pockets

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    I would rub it on from a solid block and then melt it in. I did it the other way and it was way too much and made the material too stiff.