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preparation for earthquake

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by jocsen, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. jocsen

    jocsen Loaded Pockets

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    In the last days we have a lot of earthquakes in Greece. What do you think should be in a backpack in order to act immediately?
     
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  2. TC32

    TC32 Empty Pockets

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    I am lucky enough to not live in an earthquake prone part of the world but I do live in a multi-storey building and have a bag ready to go with some items to help in emergency exit should the building be badly damaged by fire etc.

    I shall leave it to others to discuss the details of earthquake specific actions but the below may be a helpful starting point.

    If you don't do anything else, I'd say put a whistle and small AAA flashlight on your keys so that you always have these items with you. Do the same for all of your family members.

    I think you'll want to consider the following goals and assemble a kit based around them that is lightweight enough to quickly grab and move with:

    1 - Surviving the initial earthquake / escaping the building
    2 - Safely leaving the immediate affected area to reach a safe zone
    3 - Providing short term accommodation and living requirements for your family


    1 - Surviving the initial earthquake / escaping the building

    Personal protective equipment to prevent injury during your escape, as you will likely be surrounded by broken glass, sharp metal, rubble and so on. Have some strong gloves and footwear in or attached to your bag, consider safety goggles and dust masks too and maybe even a helmet. If you don't protect your hands, feet, eyes and lungs, your ability to survive other dangers will be seriously reduced.

    You will also want a good flashlight, preferably several, as there's no guarantee it will be daytime when the quake happens. The building and surrounding area may be unrecognisable from damage and light will be a good way to get attention if you need help. Pack extra batteries, preferably lithiums.

    Have extra whistles in your bag to give to others. They are cheap, effective means of communication with no batteries or training required.

    Consider tools to help open or break doors and windows that may have become stuck due to the building shifting. I have a small crowbar, centre punch for glass and a multitask.

    Lastly, pack a first aid kit to manage any trauma or other injuries that are sustained during the earthquake. There are others way more qualified to write on this than me but do some research and assemble a FAK that you can use to your level of skill.


    2 - Safely leaving the immediate affected area to reach a safe zone

    You should already have your footwear taken care of from the previous step. The only other things I would add here are bottles of water, additional ways to clean water such as a filter or purification tablets and depending on your climate and time of year, a good waterproof coat.

    I would avoid loading yourself down with food, tents and so on, as we are going for a bag that can be grabbed and run with in a matter of seconds. Light weight and small size are key.


    3 - Providing short term accommodation and living requirements for your family

    It's very possible that you won't be able to return home immediately after an earthquake, even for an extended period afterwards. Make sure that you have a good amount of cash in the bag so that once you have reached safety you can pay for accommodation, travel, food and so on.

    You will also want to make sure you have copies of any important documents such as ID, bank details, insurance details, contact details for family and so on. The same goes for things such as photos and similar. These days lots of people use cloud storage but it doesn't hurt to have a USB drive with these on. Obviously, encrypt any sensitive info stored digitally.

    Lastly, it may be helpful to have a spare phone and way to charge it. Don't count on using it during the quake but it may be helpful to have your own phone line available to deal with all the administrative work and contacting family and friends once you are safe.


    Hopefully this information is helpful. I'm not an expert by any means and I'm sure more knowledgable people will post soon too but perhaps it's a start.
     
  3. jocsen

    jocsen Loaded Pockets

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    HI!Thank you for your answer! i think a whistle is a really good idea. Plus some kinda food like peanuts and water would be good i think.
     
  4. bpa

    bpa Loaded Pockets

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    If you have gas service, have a tool by the valve so that you can turn it off if necessary
     
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  5. MCPOWoller

    MCPOWoller Loaded Pockets

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    Water and high protein food would be helpful. Water supply may be the first to go. Tools, whistle, light, heavy duty gloves, small first aid kit would also be helpful.
     
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  6. reppans

    reppans Loaded Pockets

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    For a home BOB, a backpacker's rig - ie, fully self supported for 4-5 days. For EDC, you can get pretty close to that (1-2days) ~10 lbs/10L with ULW backpacking gear.
     
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  7. Strayz

    Strayz Loaded Pockets

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    One of the things I would also add is a way to get out of the home. I am not sure where you live at but I remember that Athen and Thessaloniki were like New York and had a lot of High Rise housing solutions.

    Very high quality/Sturdy backpack.
    General first aid Kit.
    Sleeping solution and possibly a tent.
    Food for 2-5 days.
    Water and Water Filter.
    Compass.
    Map.
    Whistle.
    a knife, depending on where you are at. Greece like many places have rules that are not enforced until it is discovered that you have something everyone thinks is illegal.
    Plan for family and others to find you, and you find them.

    After those items Google Bug out bag and see if there are things you think you might want in the back pack. The biggest issue is going to be where to keep it so that you can get it after the Quake hits before you get out of your dwelling. Might even think about the trunk of your car depending on where you park your car.
     
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