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Power Outage Kit

Discussion in 'General EDC Discussion' started by swampinboy, May 12, 2012.

  1. swampinboy

    swampinboy Loaded Pockets

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    Looking to get your thoughts and ideas on a power outage kit. I would like to have a small kit assembled in a tote or bag that will include such items for a few day power outage. I am thinking to have some glow sticks, lanterns, candles, flashlight, headlamp, and batteries. I am also thinking of a stove or burner set up for light cooking and warming. Anyone have this or ideas or additional items to include? I have a generator off site but wouldnt run it all of the time once I hook it up. It just seems like everytime we have a short term outage I am scrambling for stuff.
     
  2. yoyosma

    yoyosma Loaded Pockets

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    I like to have my JetBoil with some coffee and Mountain House or/ MRE-type meals and instant oatmeal. If you're on a well and also dont have water hand wipes are handy.
     
  3. swampinboy

    swampinboy Loaded Pockets

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    Hand wipes, very good! And yes on a well. I like the thought of some types of instant meals and beverages.
     
  4. SAKplumber
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    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    For a lightweight stove option(and inexpensive compared to the JetBoil, which I have and love) is an esbit stove. You'll need a pot with it though. I'm sure you can find plenty of options from different outdoors supplying websites like REI, etc.

    If this is truly a power outage bag and not a 72 hour bag, or Bug Out Bag(BOB), definately some simple instant oatmeal packs and some plastic bowls would work nice. I also like the Coleman brand and Mountain House brand(esecially) just add water meals in the camping secton at most stores. Along with some protien bars, and some Kool-aid, or Gatoraid, instant packs for water bottles.

    DEFINATELY a headlamp. Walmart has Energizer brand...pretty good for the random user, nothing I'd want to take spelunking. But they sure do make life easier when you can use both hands.

    Maybe a good paperback, or a deck of cards. Uno or something similar if you don't live alone or have kids who'll get bored.

    Some Hot Hands charcol type hand and foot warmers if you live in colder climates when this happens.

    We had an icestorm knock out our power for 8 days once. I changed my stove and oven to gas because of it. I do have a Dual Fuel Coleman 2 burner stove and Dual Fuel Lantern that made that bearable. Since then I got a couple of kerosene heaters, too. We were better off than most, because of my son and I's history with the Boy Scouts, so we didn't even have to go to the store. They sold out of everything anyway. If this is the type of thing you are preparing for I recommend a chest freezer. Put everything that you can from the fridge in the freezer because it'll stay cold longer since it doesnt loose cold air everytime you open the chest door, as opposed to a front door type.

    I guess the size and types of stuff depend on where you live, how much space you have, and how long you plan for. But I can tell you there are a lot of "72 hour kits" on the market that come in backpacks that list there contents on the web advertisments. You can get a lot of ideas there, as well as Youtube. Google "Youtube, Bug Out Bags".

    Also a FAK. You might get a nasty bump or cut trying to reach your bag in the first place.
     
  5. Jean

    Jean Loaded Pockets

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    We lose power quite a bit:

    Battery powered alarm clock
    Grocery stores will have the candles in a jar on sale after the Jewish holidays in bulk
    The clear solar/battery powered xmas lights
    Boardgames

    Call you water company and ask how long you will have pressure without power. This will allow you to plan your water needs, remember flushing.

    I've got a cigarette lighter tied to big alligator clamps, and a spare battery on a trickle charger. This allows me to run stuff designed for car's 12VDC.


    Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
     
  6. CatherineM
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    We have what I call safety candles. I make candles out of old wax, in large glass mugs. They are easy to carry from room to room, don't blow out easy because the wick is below the rim, and throw lots of light. They work really good in the bathroom.

    Board games because playstations don't work well without electricity.
     
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  7. floater

    floater Loaded Pockets

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    Deetz lantern for light, outlasts anything battery powered

    also keep one of those job site coolers full of water
     
  8. mooshi
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    The foldable Sterno or Coghlan's stove would be good if you don't already have the aforementioned Jetboil (I love mine! :))

    Our family has got a couple of those cheap butane stove that takes the $1.00 fuel canisters. Normally we use it for KBBQ nights, but when the power does go out, that's the first stove that we go to since we've got those canisters stocked while my Jetboil only gets new canisters when I go camping.
     
  9. mooshi
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    Foodwise, we've got instant noodles, those Knorr's sides, oatmeal, mashed potatoes, and other junk that only takes boiling water to make. :)
     
  10. hatchetjack

    hatchetjack EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    We had a 6 day several years ago and a 3 day ice storm this past winter. Some of our kit:
    Transistor radio
    Lamplight Farms oil lamp
    French press for coffee
    Air pot for hot water. Saves fuel on reheating.
     
  11. herosemblem

    herosemblem Loaded Pockets

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    It seems you already have your "lighting" bases covered, but a nice thing to have is one of those LED hand crank flashlights. I got mine from Big5 (a regional sporting goods store), and I believe it's made by Dorcy. Under $10. It's nice to have options!
     
  12. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    @swampinboy: where do you live? I only ask because the climate is a major factor when it comes to what you'll need in the event of a blackout.

    For example, here in my part of Norway, I do not really see the need to keep all my gear in a bag, as long as I know where everything is. When we do get power outages here, they are mostly because a power line has been brought down by the wind, ice or snow, or because some stupid rodent has chewed through a wire and gotten itself fried somewhere. In either case, the power will be out, and sometimes a couple of roads will be blocked due to snow or fallen trees, but everything else will normally be OK. Therefore, there is no reason to leave the house in a blackout. The sensible thing to do is to stay put and make the best of the situation. Normally, the power will be back in a couple of hours, or one or two days at most. I imagine your priorities might be very different if you live in a hurricane, tornado or flood prone area, but here, you would be much better off staying in your home than running scared through the country side.

    A lot of the things that would be most useful in a power outage would not fit in a (small) bag. For example, in a cold climate, a couple of extra blankets and perhaps a pair of slippers for everyone in the household might come in very handy. You would also want to make sure you have enough of everything: Light, backup light, batteries, candles, matches and lighters, fuel for the stove, lighter fluid, food, warm clothes... It would take a really big bag to carry all these things.

    My approach is to keep a small grab bag with a first aid kit, large Swiss Army Knife, a flash light and extra batteries and some electrical tape in my bedroom in case of a fire or other sudden incident that would make me leave the house. Everything else is stored in drawers and cupboards where it is out of the way, but easy to find in a hurry.
     
    Last edited by sungame, May 13, 2012
  13. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    A note on cooking stoves: If you already own a camping stove, that will probably serve you fine. Just make sure you have enough fuel for it. If you don't own one already, or if you want a back up, I would recommend one of the alcohol stoves from Trangia. While not as cheap or small as an Esbit stove, they are still a low cost alternative (at least here in Scandinavia). Also, they are more efficient than the Esbits, and much better if you ever have to use one outdoors. The burner is stored inside the smallest cooking pot, so all in all, you get a fairly compact kit.

    If you don't mind paying a bit, and you will use the stove for camping, hiking or other outdoor activities as well as for emergencies, I would get something like the Primus Omnifuel (if I didn't already own one :D). By changing nozzles, these stoves can run on white gas/coleman fuel, kerosene/lamp oil and camping gas. At least if you use one of the two first fuels, they are very fuel efficient. Also, they give you way better heat control than a Trangia or Esbit stove, and at least if you stay away from the camping gas, they will work just fine even in extreme cold.

    EDIT: Some spelling and grammar corrected in both this and my previous post.
     
    Last edited by sungame, May 13, 2012
  14. chrisr

    chrisr Loaded Pockets

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    A can opener. Sucks to have food, and no way to open it. This assumes you normally use an electric opener.
     
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  15. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

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    "...everytime we have a short term outage I am scrambling for stuff."
    Determine what it is that you scrambled for the last time that you experienced an "outage" and you will answer your own question instead of asking us. You may end up gathering several items that you don't actually need based on our suggestions.
     
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  16. KG2V

    KG2V Loaded Pockets

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    A Generator ;)
     
  17. TarHeelBrit
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    Considering how frequently the power goes out in my tiny piece of north Raleigh I have:

    Multiple candles in jars, as already mentioned safer for moving around the house.
    According to my wife "way too many flashlights" :)
    Battery powered clock.
    Hand crank AM/FM Weather radio/lamp.
    Esbit cookset with extra fuel tabs.
    Folding Firebox multi-fuel stove with grill and boil plates.
    P38, P51, FRED can openers
    MH, MRE entrees and noodles, mashed potatoes, etc . Foods that just need hot water.
    As for water storage. 1 tub filled for toilet flushing and the other will have a WaterBOB for potable water.
    Boardgames, cards and books to pass the time.

    I'm sure I've forgot something???
     
  18. KG2V

    KG2V Loaded Pockets

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    Seriously - I used to (and still somewhat do) have Blackout preps, but if your power goes out regularly (and by MY definition that's 1x/year or more), probably your best prep is a nice Generator, - whole house if you can afford it. Having to use a CPAP machine (and they are somewhat power hungry), I bought a small genny, and I'm seriously looking at a whole house unit, and we lose power once every few years. Survival at that point is waiting the few seconds for the unit to kick in
     
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  19. SAKplumber
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    SAKplumber EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    Victorinox SwissTool! I can't beleive no one said MultiTool! Lol.

    I read that you have access to a small gas powered genorator but you should read up about what one can do to appliances.
     
  20. kertap75

    kertap75 EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    If and when I buy my own house that's one of the first things I want to add. Either enough solar/wind generation to be almost self sufficient or a generator hooked into the gas line. Around here we lose power almost every summer at least once. And about every 3 to 5 years is a bad winter storm with wide spread power loss.