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Portable Diphenhydramine for FAK

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by kevinstan, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. kevinstan

    kevinstan Banned

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    I have been upgrading my FAK lately and realized I am missing a couple of things. One of the most important one is a compact easily carried form of benadryl. I have seen before the pre measured spoons that seem portable, as well as the small transparent film quick melts - but so far no luck finding them in any stores or even online. I was wondering how everyone else carries benadryl for allergic reactions. I have 3 kids all 10 and under and I like being prepared. Anyone have any ideas or can point me in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. rsitter

    rsitter EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    why not the pills?
     
  3. kevinstan

    kevinstan Banned

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    Young kids. I heard the liquid acts faster and is better ? Correct me if I'm wrong, but I was advised against pills for quick remedy of allergic reaction. Especially in younger children. ??
     
  4. Macgirl

    Macgirl Loaded Pockets

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    As small as a Benadryl pill is, kids still have issue with swallowing one, at least mine does so I assume that's the issue here.
     
  5. me_john85

    me_john85 Loaded Pockets

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    What about the sealed staw technique.

    Sent from my GT-P3113 using Tapatalk
     
  6. kevinstan

    kevinstan Banned

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    I thought about the sealed straw since I do that for other things in my fak but I'm worried about good measuring. And I'm not sure if a teaspoon would even fit in a straw ? I have thought of that, but wanted to see what everyone else was doing.
     
  7. rsitter

    rsitter EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    how bout a foodsaver. use the 'seal' function with those vac seal bags. you can measure out single doses and just make a few of them.
     
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  8. Evilbunny

    Evilbunny Loaded Pockets

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    From what I understand Both brands that made those perfect measure spoons were discontinued. I found a place that seemed to have some instock though called foodtown.
    Benadryl

    Allergy - Perfect Measure
     
  9. me_john85

    me_john85 Loaded Pockets

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    Get some big milkshake straws and a syringe. That would be a good way to measure it.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Cprrckwlf

    Cprrckwlf Loaded Pockets

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    The strips have also been discontinued, though CVS and Walgreens both put out a generic in a children's format quick dissolve/rapid melt tab.

    You might also check the legalities and discuss with your pediatrician the possibility of prescribing an epi pen (as well as in depth allergy testing, of course).
     
  11. DBR

    DBR Loaded Pockets

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    Make sure that you have your child tested by an Allergist. Do not rely on a regular Pediatrician to do it. Have the child tested and if they are not allergic, they are not allergic. I don't know of any legalities about having a Epi-Pen Rxd. You either have the Rx or you do not. But if your child is allergic and that goes into their medical record, you might hit the wall financially, they can be as high as $200.00 currently and they will probably go higher because of the change in health care laws and if the child goes to public school, they will demand at least one of them. You should have two on hand at home if they are actually allergic to something, the second is in case the ambulance doesn't arrive fast enough.

    My Wife told my Son's Pediatrician that she was allergic to bananas and kiwis and the Pediatrician then Rxd my Son an Epi on the guess that he would be as well and, at the time, we could only afford one of them and the school demanded it. So much for children's safety. They would not let it be transported between home and school, either. Thank The Egg he is graduating this year so I don't have to deal with county school bureaucrats anymore.
     
  12. bcWRX-02

    bcWRX-02 Loaded Pockets

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    Triaminic thin strips are still available I believe (they are the same thing). Our ambulance service uses benadryl strips or chewables, not sure where they get them from now
     
  13. Cprrckwlf

    Cprrckwlf Loaded Pockets

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    You are 100% right there, the questions I was thinking of were all around if you have an Epi-Pen and were to use it, or assist in its use, on someone other than who it was prescribed for. We had a very long discussion on it in my last NOLS refresher. One of the guys who holds EMT-B and WEMT even had an interesting problem where he lives: as an EMT he is not allowed to administer an Epi-Pen, but as a WEMT he is. He said he decided long ago that if it came down to it and the Epi-Pen was what was needed his criteria for whether he was acting in an Urban or Wilderness capacity was going to be whether or not there was a plant or animal anywhere nearby. :D


    I didn't know Triminic made allergy stuff at all. (I don't have kids but I looked at Triminic a few weeks ago when I was sick and looking for dextromethorphan without guaifenesin -- because I think combining cough suppressants and expectorants is dumb.) Anyway, I just popped over to their website and they've got a big notice that they discontinued the strips due to "business need" in Jan 2012. :(
     
  14. DBR

    DBR Loaded Pockets

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    Triaminic, as far as I know, has DMX as CPrr pointed out. Some people use either one as a sleep aid, DMX or Pat Benedryl / Daphne Hydramine. :D
     
  15. Day Tripper

    Day Tripper Loaded Pockets

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    You can chew up the pills, which destroys the outer coating and helps the medicine get in your system faster. Tastes nasty, but does the trick. Or crush them and dissolve them in a small glass of water and drink it.
     
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  16. DBR

    DBR Loaded Pockets

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    For fast action you can separate the capsule and then take the powder on your finger and rub that onto the roof of the mouth of someone having an allergic reaction. It does work, it is quick but is not a substitute for something like Epinephrine. Learned that trick from an instruction sheet in a Bob Cooper Survival Kit and the tip was from David Alloway. I used it on a friend who was having a mild allergic reaction. She is allergic to apples and sometimes manufactures of fruit juices don't disclose that they use apple juice as a base. She drank it and instantly, the roof of her mouth started to itch. I separated a 25MG generic Diphenhydramine capsule and rubbed it on the roof of her mouth and she took a second pill orally, intact, a few minutes later and she was fine. Some people have much more severe allergies and this will not work and only an Epi Pen will do, short of having a Doctor or EMT on site with injectable Epinephrine, etc.
     
  17. Kilted1

    Kilted1 Loaded Pockets

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    I keep the dye free gel caps around. If someone can't swallow them for whatever reason, it's easy enough to make a hole and squeeze the juice into their mouth. Thankfully I've never had to do this but that's my emergency plan. It might taste nasty but some will get in even if I have to find another route (which I hope it never comes to).

    My wife has some moderate food allergies so we have to be careful when eating out. Onion being hard to avoid, often listed as 'spices', we keep stocked on Benadryl or similar. She liked the strips a lot as they were easy to keep with her all the time and kicked in quickly, but they were only around for a little while.

    I try to stick with the dye free ones. If I eat anything red, it's going to make the left side of my neck itch for a day or so. If it gets bad enough that I want to take a pill for it, I'd rather not take one that contains the same stuff that caused the initial problem.
     
  18. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    I have chewed up Benadryl capsules before. Not great, but not terrible, either. A ten-year-old should be able to do it just fine, but younger children may not be willing to chew up something bitter.

    Unless you have a child with an allergy known to produce anaphylaxis (peanut allergies are especially dangerous), most food allergies produce a milder reaction that does not demand instant intravenous medication. Personally, I have tried an Epi-Pen for a non-life-threatening allergic reaction (severe hives and itching) and it did nothing but speed up my pulse and give me a big green bruise the next day.
     
  19. DBR

    DBR Loaded Pockets

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    Well, you can tell you have a strong heart! Because that was a pretty big risk!
     
  20. jag-engr
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    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    True enough. Interestingly, a doctor had prescribed it to me after several trips to the ER for allergic reactions. It didn't help at all and I ended up in the ER anyway.

    I've since figured out what does work (Benadryl, Pepcid, and prednisone) that I can take in a low dose at home. Fortunately, I have managed to avoid a reaction for some years now.