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Pocket FAKs

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by thegrouch314, Mar 28, 2018.

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  1. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    If you guys have a pocket sized FAK (jeans pocket sort of size), share them here. I'm always lookking for ideas as to how to improve mine.

    I currently have two pocket sized FAKs. One is an old pill bottle, approximately 6x4cm. The other is a typical pouch shaped, 10x8x4cm.

    Bottle:
    [​IMG]

    4 assorted plasters
    2 5x5 dressings
    5 steri-strips
    tape
    anti-septic cream
    anti-histamine cream
    Meds wrapped in colour coded foil: paracetamol, ibuprofen, loratadine, buscopan, caffeine, travel sick, ant-acids.
    Other prescription meds (the yellow ones)

    The flat things roll up around the sides and the tape, pills and creams sort of jam into the middle.
    This is how it looks without the pills:
    [​IMG]


    The other one is a cheap Masterplast FAK that I gutted and replaced the contents. I have several of these scattered about the place. There's one on my desk, one in my bedside table, one in the garage. I give these out to friends and family too.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Alcohol wipes
    Cleaning wipes
    Assorted plasters
    Steri-Strips
    Dressings
    Micropore tape
    Zinc oxide tape

    [​IMG]
    (Sorry it's so blurry)

    More dressings, adhesive and non-adhesive
    Crepe bandage folded flat
    Safety pins
     
  2. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    Try out TheUrbanPrepper's "Mini Medi."
     
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  3. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    Mostly self-explanatory. The tablets are aspirin (cardiac arrest), the card has a duct tape wrap on one end and micropore tape on the other, the red sachets are burn stop. The bag is a heavy-duty grip seal from ebay.
     
    #3 PragmaticMurphyist, Mar 29, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
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  4. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    Very nice

    Are those savlon sachets? I've never seen them before. Where did you get them?
     
  5. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Savlon antiseptic wipes, sadly now these seem to be discontinued. There are lots of other wound cleaning wipes, but these were larger and more robust than most.

    Sorry!
     
  6. Tromba

    Tromba Loaded Pockets

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    I make them in bulk based on the urban prepper mini medi. I have one in every different jacket and I carry one in my pockets when I am able.

    They come in handy so often with a 3 year old running around.
     
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  7. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    If your "patient" is in cardiac arrest, they're beyond aspirin, lol.
     
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  8. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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  9. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    Aspirin is for chest pain (warning sign of heart attack). You might be better off carrying chewable baby aspirin. Thats what EMS usually carries. Give 4 for a total of 324mg (81 MG each).
     
  10. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for the tip.
     
  11. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    I was ribbing you.

    To arrest is to stop. So when you have "cardiac arrest" the heart has stopped and without measures, we're all incapable of providing outside of multi-thousand dollars in preps and training, you're looking at the end.

    When pain is onset, the aspirin is typically a good choice unless you know they're actually allergic, i.e. anaphylaxis. The aspirin isn't for pain but rather the inhibition of platelet aggregation.
     
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  12. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Oh gawd, don't bring ribs into it! It's complicated enough!

    Yep, one thing all my various trainers hammered into us was the need to find a defib ASAP. Breaths and compressions buy time, but that's about it. (Something TV gets consistently wrong. Apparently shouting, "Don't you die on me!" is also ineffective.)

    Another one to remember is no aspirin for children or teens (Reyes syndrome?)
     
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  13. T Shrapnel-Carruthers

    T Shrapnel-Carruthers Loaded Pockets

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    Can't imagine carrying FAK in my pocket but do have one in my briefcase: 1oz tin with plasters, sterilising wipes, wound closures, paracetamol, ibuprofen, and loperamide (anti-diarhoreal).
     
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  14. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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  15. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    As long as you don't try to perform a precordial thump like they always like to show on TV lol. That's where they pound on the patient's chest when someone is in cardiac arrest. They don't even train paramedics to do it any more!
     
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  16. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Now you've got me seriously questioning my TV-based decision to go into bomb disposal! ("Red wire... Blue wire..."!) :frantic:


    Back to the topic - even a couple of plasters (bandaids) is better than nothing. Going into a meeting dripping blood (even your own!) can get you talked about!
     
  17. jag-engr
    • Administrator

    jag-engr Semper Bufo!
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    How common is an aspirin allergy? I'm just curious.

    I'm in my late 30's and have never taken aspirin that I can remember :unsure:
     
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  18. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    Not sure of the prevalence. If you're fine with other NSAIDs like ibuprofen and naoroxen you're probably ok although people with asthma, hives, and reccurent upper respiratory issues seems to be somewhat predispositioning although I'm only describing this on a shallow level.

    I don't have any number handy, but after antibiotics the NSAIDs have the most sensitivities.



    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
     
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  19. PragmaticMurphyist

    PragmaticMurphyist Loaded Pockets

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    Your curiosity was infectious, so I went looking and turned up this link: https://www.allergy.org.au/patients/medication-allergy/allergic-reactions-to-aspirin-and-other-pain-killers It reckons c. 1%, but amongst people with asthma (like me) or nasal polyps it's more like 10-30% (so I'm glad I looked! Thank you).

    One more reason to remember the AMPLE checks - https://www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advice/what-to-do-as-a-first-aider/how-to-assess-a-casualty/the-secondary-survey.aspx
     
  20. SOS24

    SOS24 Loaded Pockets

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    I carry some first aid items in a pocket organizer: three steri-strips, a 2x2, couple bandaids of different sizes, small piece of mole foam, alcohol wipes and goodys powder. I also carry an Officer Survival Solutions Pocket Patrol Pack (pressure bandage, swat-t, woundclot, gloves) for more of a trauma incident.