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Pen recommendations

Discussion in 'Pens, Pencils, Notebooks, and Notebook Covers' started by Tromba, Apr 13, 2018.

  1. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    I see the pressurized cartridge pens as being "take a note/sign for dinner" type pens, by & large. If there's much writing to be done, it's with a fountain pen, rollerball, or gel pen with better ergonomics and smoother writing. As previously mentioned, I own some Jotters, and I put them in the same category...pocket pen for quick but not extensive notes, signature, etc. If I have to write pages (Pl.), I grab a Waterman rollerball. Ballpoints are the equivalent of cruel & inhuman punishment if you have to write much....plus they don't write a dark enough line.
     
  2. aih

    aih Loaded Pockets

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    @_mg_ The clip looks ok to me. I like that it is attaches at the top and not down lower on the barrel. As far as the attachment method, that looks ok to me as well. Looks like ring of the clip where it attaches is crimped or pressed into a groove around the barrel at the top of the pen body. I don't fear that it will come loose. My only thing I know I will be watching is potential wear and tear on the shirt pocket.

    @Gogogordy This original AG7 is a decent pen. I see what others say about it being top heavy, but I don't think that will be a problem. Some complain that the barrel starts to narrow too high up, but if it does or doesn't I think it feels fine and doesn't feel too skinny. It's chrome-plated brass; solid, substantial; but I still would not want to drop it. The only hesitation I would have in recommending it is I don't fancy the ink and the way Fisher cartridges write as much as I do Parker ball point cartridges and ink, but it is acceptable and you may like it (and as others have remarked, one can use other cartridges anyway). All in all, it is an attractive, well-made writing instrument. Hat tip to @Moshe ben David for recommending it.
     
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  3. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    These pens usually ship with the Fisher medium tip refill, in black ink. Unfortunately, the medium tip has a history of being somewhat blobby on startup, which is not all that nice. Some time back Fisher came out with Fine tip refills, initially in blue ink and I think now in black ink. The fine tip refills have garnered a reputation for NOT being blobby. You may want to consider trying one.

    The other complaint one often hears about Fisher refills is that the ink does not flow as freely as what so many expect after having used gel or rollerball refills in other pens. I suspect this characteristic will not change with the tip size. Fisher designed the pen to 'write upside down, on vertical surfaces, under water, over grease...' you know the drill. This is accomplished in large part because the refills are sealed; the ink is under pressure (nitrogen gas I believe), plus is 'thixotropic'. Inside the refill it is more like a paste, rather than a gel or a liquid.

    Like most of us, I don't anticipate writing in zero gravity. Nor typically under water. I do often write on a vertical surface. The other hugely beneficial thing for me about Fisher pens is that they do not leak. Not even when stored in a car in the heat of summer. They are not affected by freezing cold of winter. They just write. Plus the refills have a much much longer writing distance than any gel or roller ball refill I've ever used -- generally longer than most 'standard' ball points also.

    At any rate, congrats on your acquisition! May you use it long and in good health!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  4. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    To me, that's the big negative issue with Fisher pens--there are NO acceptable alternative cartridges that work in them. The only refill that will fit in terms of length & diameter is the Zebra F type...If used it will wobble due to smaller tip diameter. In my estimation it is jumping from frying pan to the fire in terms of ink/writing quality, anyway. Zebra ballpoint is awful...the pens are great but the ink is very substandard. I don't understand why they don't produce their gel & hybrid inks in the same size cartridge so it could be used in a F-701...or at the least produce a gel version of the F-701 the way they did with the 301. The Jotter is the better alternative in terms of choice of refills, because it will take any Parker type refill...which means it would also take the Fisher with adapter.
     
  5. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    @Tesla: right you are. If a pen body will handle a Parker type refill that pen can absolutely take a Fisher refill -- they're generally packaged with a little tail adapter specifically to go where Parker refills go. I have many of my pens so equipped!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  6. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I have one small testimonial to Fisher pens. Over the last summer, I worked with my city government to catalog the state of the sidewalks and sidewalk ramps as they pertained to ADA regulations (internship). This necessitated walking outdoors in the summer heat for most of the day, every day. The paper maps I had to mark up with data were, of course, subject to sweat and grease, which meant that a standard ballpoint would not reliably write on them, but the data had to be made in ink, so I could not use pencil. A Fisher pen was the only writing tool that worked reliably on that greasy, sweaty, humidified paper. They aren't the most pleasant writing experience, but when you need a pen to write on less than ideal surfaces, they're sometimes the only option. I like to keep some around for that reason.
     
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  7. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    Yes..different horses for different courses!
     
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  8. aih

    aih Loaded Pockets

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    If nothing else, this thread shows that a pen can be a very personal thing. That's probably true for every item discussed in these forums. I think my instincts in my original response to the OP were correct: What works for me may not work for him, nor for a lot of guys (and gals), and it is wise to help someone like the OP discover what does work for them.

    I've discovered something I don't like about the AG7. It doesn't take a lot of force to depress the button at the top and extend the ballpoint. I found the pen open in my pocket a couple times today. I think I probably did it when taking out boarding passes and returning them to my pocket. The good news is ink did not bleed into the fabric of my shirt pocket.

    It occurs to me that I mostly use twist to open pens nowadays. Not because I have really thought about it. Just happened because of the pens I like for aesthetic reasons and the way the pen feels in the hand. But now I'm thinking about it.

    As far as writing, and writing a lot..... If I am writing pages, I hope it is typing. I don't want to be at one sitting writing pages with a pen, not nowadays.
     
  9. Stonerman33
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Stonerman33 Loaded Pockets

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    This is partially true. Recently, a pen maker created and now sells a D1 adapter that is fisher sized. Basically, it’s a fisher shaped cartridge that you stick a D1 refill into. It even has an adjustment screw to tweak how much of the tip sticks out of the end of the pen. All for the princely sum of $16. D1 refills can be found in ballpoint, gel, and hybrid ink formulations of various tip sizes. They don’t hold a lot of ink, so be prepared to swap refills somewhat frequently, and the refills themselves are usually a couple bucks each.

    https://www.schondsgn.com/collections/pens/products/inks?variant=7266294202414


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    I wonder if that will function in Zebra pens, since the 2 refills (Zebra & Fisher) are virtually identical except for tip diameter?
     
  11. Tromba

    Tromba Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks again for all of the suggestions. It was exactly what I was hoping for.

    I had it narrowed down to the parker jotter or the fisher ag7. I was at a staples today and was able to handle a jotter. I didn’t particularly like the feel in my hand so I think an ag7 will be the winner. I do carry a fisher bullet in my pocket and love it so I think the ag7 will be a good compliment as my daily work horse at my job.

    Thanks again.
     
  12. aih

    aih Loaded Pockets

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    Excellent. I was going to ask if you had made a decision. And I was going to advise that there are some premium Jotter versions that look pretty nice, but OBE.

    I'm interested in what you think of the AG7 as compared to your experience holding the Jotter. As others have already pointed out, they aren't too different, at least I don't think so.

    By the way, my overall experience with the AG7 on my trip earlier in the week was positive. I spent one day in a meeting taking notes, plus the odd use for various things on travel days. No real issues, pen worked fine, comfortable to hold and use. My only negative experience was accidently pressing the button and extending the ballpoint in my pocket by accident, but once I realized I was doing it I just watched myself from then on and no more open pen in pocket.
     
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  13. eholland

    eholland Loaded Pockets

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    Best click pen I’ve used within the past 10 years is the Cross Gel Click Pena available on Amazon from $15-$70. I haven’t paid over $23 for any of the three I have and love them. Ink lasts a long time and refills available on Amazon (buy the 5 pack ink replacements when found).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. BugOutBob

    BugOutBob Empty Pockets

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    Look up the Zebra F-xMD, it runs about $15 shipped from the UK. It is a full stainless steel pen for a great price. You can use it as is or pull out the only plastic part from the nose and pop in a Fisher refill. I haven't broken mine in over a year of dropping it.
     
  15. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    It is erroneous to say it's a "full stainless" pen. It is made the same as the F-701 except for the clicker. It has a stainless shell over a plastic frame, basically and is no more or less durable than the F-701.
     
  16. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    While I am sure you could design a pen top heavy enough to cause it to tend to rotate to land top top it would be horrible to actually write with. You typically want something between balanced (weight balance point in the middle of the pen) and tip heavy depending on your writing style. Top heavy, which you get with some styles with posted caps) feel terrible in the hand. Even slightly top heavy can by annoying. For example I have a Big Idea Designs Ti Arto, that is a titanium screw capped pen. The cap posts on the back to avoid loosing it. I love the style and the refill mechanism but don't really enjoy writing with the pen as it is slightly top heavy with the cap posted. I enjoy writing with Tactile Turn pens, especially the new style Movers and Shakers that are slightly tip weight biased. I have some Japanese rollerballs that have become desk/drawer queens since they are so top heavy with the cap posted, that I have to keep track of a loose cap when I am using them, which is annoying.
     
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  17. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    Civilized folk use pen holders/wallets. Engineering nerds and techs used pocket protectors due to the need to have a bunch of sharp tipped mechanical pencils and technical pens in various colours to mark up drawings. Sadly these days are gone with the advent of CAD. Heck, decent pens are even a dying item, with the advent of mass produced plastic barrelled crap, and the fact that way less actual writing is being done.

    When I started in engineering, drawings were all done by hand, with entire drafting departments to do up professional/production drawings, and informal memos were written by hand on standard 3 ply memo sheets. Official, or more senior distribution memos were all hand written and then submitted to the office secretary, to be typed. I can remember when the department got its first single shared pc in 1982.

    Things that make you realize you are ..... old.
     
  18. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    For those that like Fisher pens but are less than thrilled with their refills (which are amazing for their write anywhere, at any temp, and survival in cars winter and summer but have a writing experience only slightly above writing on a cave wall with a blunt piece of charcoal) there are adaptors that "adapt" a DI style refill to the standard Fisher pressurized refill dimensions. Just to be clear I love Fisher pens and am amazed at what conditions they can write under. I carried a Spacepen for over 20 years as my edc pocket pen. I have one in all my vehicle glove boxes as I know it will write at any temp, and after years sitting there. However, you cannot get a decent super fine line width, and even their fine is a fairly nasty writing experience compared to a good gel refill like a Pilot G2 or a Pentel EngerGel. If you love the pen, or the format and want better refills, and are willing to give up the write anywhere, bombproof performance (ie you want a pen for reasonable temperatures, and dry conditions to write on paper which is true for most writing people do), consider:

    https://www.shapeways.com/product/XQZNG8V2L/adapter-fisher-pr-to-d1-mini

    I have no direct experience with the product but there are way more refill styles available in the D1 format. I suspect you are going to get some tip wobble which may be a showstopper for some folks.

    There may also be similar products available as models on MakerSpace, if you have access to a 3D printer.
     
  19. Tesla

    Tesla Loaded Pockets

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    I bought one of the 3D adaptors off this Tofty site awhile back to adapt Jetstream SXR-80 refills to Zebra F type refills. It worked in my 301 compact just fine, but would not advance & retract properly in my F-701, which was disappointing. The idea of having to use a D1 style refill in a full-size pen does not really appeal to me due to the lack of ink capacity, but the Zebra to D1 might conceivably work in the Zebra F-701.
     
  20. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    I completely agree about refill capacity being an issue. However, I have been on a lifelong quest for the "perfect" pen. Which to me is a combination of style, functionality, build quality, weight, material, grip design and texture, and did I mention weight (I like heavy pens). Plus it HAS to write well. I that end I have bought many pens. Especially small run artisan pens as they tend to be made of materials I prefer (metal, carbon fibre, exotic woods). While I realize this is rather OCD and a source of considerable amusement for my adult children, it harms no one and is a more affordable obsession than some.

    A bad refill completely ruins a good pen for me. Given that, I would and have happily spent more money feeding a pen that I liked expensive refills. Plus I don't actually write much anymore and the experience is way more important than the "cost per page" metric. One of the pens I used a fair bit was a Rotring Trio, loaded with a pen, pencil and stylus back in the days of the PalmPilot. A refill lasted about a week but I always had some in a desk drawer and tucked away in my TimeText.

    One of the things I liked about the Big Idea Designs clutch mechanism pens is that they handle most refills. Which allows me to continue to spend money at CultPens and JetPens buying and trying different refills, when I already have way more than a lifetime supply of refills in my desk drawer.
     
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