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Parang v. Kukri v. "Standard" Machete?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Snyperx, May 23, 2017.

  1. Snyperx

    Snyperx Loaded Pockets

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    So this thread is kind of related to the thread I started asking what kukri I should get based on the 3 choices I listed. Came across the Parang style machete and am now considering that over a kukri.

    Can anyone with experience chime in on the most useful machete style for general bushcraft needs (tinder, medium chopping, etc...). Thanks.
     
  2. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    I'm not a bushcraft kind of guy but I use a machete on my property for the clearing the heavy undergrowth that you get in the tropics called bush . For limbing trees and batoning wood for fires in the Midwest, I prefer something about 3/16" thick, about 20 ounces and about a foot long. I also prefer something that is forward heavy like a bolo.

    I believe that you would like a bush machete made of thicker stock.

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  3. Ghostwalker54

    Ghostwalker54 Loaded Pockets

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    In short (and having travelled all over the world most of my life) what adnj appears to be saying is that it may come down to your intended needs. I have a Kukri and a machete. The Kukri is great for cutting small saplings, log splitting and lopping off heads (mine has an extremely heavy blade). But I've seen indigenous people in Nepal and elsewhere use the Kukri as if it were an extension of their arm and hand. The machete is great for certain high Florida grass and other light / thin twig trimming but isn't a great cutter for small saplings and log splitting, etc. And while I've seen the parang used quite often in SE Asia I have no real experience with it's use. It was (in most cases) a bit thicker than a true machete though. Good luck on your decision.


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  4. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for that ghostwalker. Internet fiasco earlier...

    A bush machete is the typical machete profile that you see in the movies. It's also quite effective and with the proper thickness can be used like a knife. I have used a lot of different machete styles in many places in the Americas but the bush style can fill many roles from cleaning fish to butchering game to building a shelter. It also has the benefit of being easily resheathed with one hand when worn on your belt.
     
  5. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Well, seems I've also seen here on edcf and other places some postings for a different tool called the Woodman's Pal (& perhaps by other names?):

    [​IMG]

    Those who have referenced it seemed to like it a lot. I have no direct experience with any of these tools. Although I will admit I find the Kukri style has a certain attraction...!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  6. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    ^
    What you have there looks like a stylised version of what we call 'vesuri'. A common tool used by loggers and farmers when felling trees with chainsaw. You normally cut branches from felled tree with your chainsaw, but you can also use your 'vesuri' for that. Clearing bushes, dragging, etc. being other traditional uses.

    Unlike machetes, kukris et al this tool has no military/weapon connations at al

    Here is a picture of standard one by Fiskars:
    [​IMG]

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  7. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I do not like the woodsman's pal. As a brush clearing device it is much inferior to an 18 inch Latin pattern machete. The edge is too thick and it's too short. It's not thick enough and the edge geometry isn't great for heavy chopping. The hook is not as useful as it may seem and it makes the blade unwieldy and throws the balance off. It's a perfect example in my opinion of a tool that was designed to do everything passably and ends up doing nothing well. Too heavy for brush. Not heavy enough for harder woods. Awkward blade shape. Too short for clearing. Too long for camp use. Too heavy for comfortable all day use, gets hard to control with fatigue. Expensive enough that you don't really want to beat the snot out of it like you sometimes do with a machete to get a job done.

    If you need a chopper, a big knife or kukri is your knife. If you need a clearer for grasses and light brush a machete is perfect. If you need to cut medium woody vegetation a parang is probably what you're looking for. Think about what you will be using it for, find a country with similar blade needs, and find out what their traditional tool is- chances are it's been honed over generations to be perfect for their needs.

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  8. Sweedsteel

    Sweedsteel Empty Pockets

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    This is made in Finland. The thousand year old tool for bush cutting here is a regular shaped big 10" or so, Laplander knife. The ax is better in Scandinavia because there aren't any jungle vegetation, mostly trees.

    For me the Fiskars "machete" is just a product for middle aged guys in suburban gardens. Besides, Fiskars is not the brand to bring when living out your Tarzan dream in deep Africa


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  9. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    ^
    Middle aged - check
    Suburban - check

    However, I'm a farm boy born and raised and frankly have never seen vesuri used outside farming/logging environment. In those circles however, I've done my share with Ponsses, Valmets, Husqvarnas, and vesuris :)

    Clearly there are differences between Nordic countries


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  10. adnj

    adnj Loaded Pockets

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    While not Africa, I can say from experience that Fiskars is well represented in the tropical rainforests that I frequent. You see more Martindale, Tramontina and non-American brands from China simply because they are less expensive (and you can easily see why). Stihl and Husqvarna are some of the only brands that some people buy in motor driven equipment.

    It's the undergrowth that makes all the difference. It's often more work getting to the trees than actually cutting them down.



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  11. Sweedsteel

    Sweedsteel Empty Pockets

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    Glad to hear they sell good. After all is my neighbor we're talking about.


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  12. Brainstorm

    Brainstorm Loaded Pockets

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    ROTFL, @Sweedsteel! :rofl_revamped:

    I actually used a Fiskars machete in West Africa for many years. Cleared brush, collected firewood, and even cut open a bunch of coconuts. And unlike the cheap local blades, it held an edge and didn't rust. :p

    @Mark_Trail: Interesting note about the Vesuri style! Just did a quick search on the big Brazilian river website, and that "vesuri" model of Fiskars does not appear to be available in US. They have a similar one with a saw opposite the blade, but not the plain blade you posted. Oh well...
     
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  13. Mark_Trail

    Mark_Trail Loaded Pockets

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    ^
    Maybe it is positioned more as a some kind of survival tool or something with saw edge. I've never seen vesuri; Fiskars or else; with saw edge. Not sure how well that would work with the curved tip, my initial thought most probably would be cut by striking instead of trying sawing if faced of a some task with saw edged vesuri as tool




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    #13 Mark_Trail, Jun 2, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2017
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  14. crwoody

    crwoody Loaded Pockets

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    My two cents: I have a friend with many acres of farmland. We go out and camp/survive sometimes. I use a Kukri, specifically the Cold Steel Magnum Kukri. It's heavy curved edge can do more than clear brush, like chopping wood pretty well. You also can't easily beat the price of 22 bucks. So Kukri would be my vote, but it depends a lot on what you're using it for.[​IMG]

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  15. SlimJim16v

    SlimJim16v Loaded Pockets

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    That Fiskars thing is a version of a Billhook, was quite common in Europe.

    There is a blade that has had very good reviews for this use, on a blade forum. However every time I mention it, my post disappears. So I won't.
     
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