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Paleo Diet and core strength..anyone?

Discussion in 'The Breakroom' started by ketchupgun, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. ketchupgun

    ketchupgun Loaded Pockets

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    :):(:):(:frantic:

    Well...let's leave it at different strokes for differnt folks...I'm of the "who benefits from this" mentality and the Monsantos of the world come to mind...and so the link i posted makes some great points and we're all entitled to our opinions.

    Cheers! All good.
     
  2. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    OK, let's leave it at that. I guess we were straying a bit off topic anyway.
     
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  3. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

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    It's not optimal, but it's better than nothing. Ideally, one should get 30 minutes of continuous exercise 3-4 times a week (or more). When I started trying to "cram" workouts into five days out of seven, I was hard pressed to find time. What I did was set my alarm clock fifteen minutes earlier for a week - getting in as much of my workout as I could - then fifteen minutes earlier the next week and then again the next. I eased my way in to waking up 45 minutes earlier without the pain of doing it all at once. Now, I'm used to it.

    I guess I'll weigh in on the organic food issue too. As the husband of a dietitian, I've been aware that the scientific/dietetic community has known for quite some time that the benefits of "organic" produce are relatively limited. The Stanford review was of existing studies (one could call it a meta-study as sungame did). Stanford didn't go out and conduct new research that contradicted previous research. They reviewed existing research. Some of the research reviewed was relatively old (in terms of the organic food trend).

    You'll note that I made a comment, earlier in this thread, about the nutritional value of frozen vegetables being greater than that of fresh in many cases. This is due, in large part, to the fact that the frozen vegetables are picked at the peak of their ripeness (and nutritional value) and frozen almost immediately. Conversely, much of the produce one finds in the typical grocery store was picked well before its peak and sits around long after its peak. This is less of an issue if you're from local growers, of course.

    What we lack, in terms of comparative research, are the long-term effects of produce raised utilizing pesticides, etc. vs. produce raised organically. Logically, one could surmise that organic produce would have the edge. However, short-term studies don't seem to bear this out - as we saw in the Stanford research review.

    With all that said, we eat a lot of "organic" produce from our own garden, trees and fields. I'm not against organic. I'm just skeptical of paying a LOT more for it from a grocery store or farmers' market.
     
  4. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    Hey, It's all good. I don't think I was too far afield as we were talking about organic foods from the get go. But be that as it may, I only posted the Sanford article to further the discussion, not upset anyone or start an argument. If Ketchup, or anyone else, felt that way, I apologize. I would agree that any so called study should be looked at with a critical eye, especially as to who is paying for it.

    We have a large family garden at the family farm so I eat lots of "organic". I guess Mudin's last sentence sums it up for me.
     
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  5. ketchupgun

    ketchupgun Loaded Pockets

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    @mud
    How do structure your eating around workouts? Ie: carbs before then protiens after? Nothing before, protiens after? That sorta thing...?

    Thx
     
  6. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

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    I usually don't each much before workouts ... mainly because I dislike puking. :hungry: I do drink quite a bit of water throughout the day - before, during and after workouts. I have an after-workout drink that I make with whey protein powder, honey and wheat grass powder. Then, I just eat "normally", i.e. a "balanced" plate of (mostly) simple carbs (fruits & veggies) and protein. I shoot for about 60% carbs and 40% protein on my plate. Additionally, I try to eat several smaller "meals" (usually six) rather than three larger meals.

    If I'm doing an early morning race, I'll have a Boost and plenty of water before the race.
     
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  7. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    I'm a big fame of Reason magazine. As such, I sometimes got to their YT channel. I just watched this recently posted video and thought of this old thread. As always, I only toss it up to further the discussion.

     
  8. ProjeKtWEREWOLF

    ProjeKtWEREWOLF Loaded Pockets

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    This is really interesting.......watch it all before you pre-judge.


    I've 'slipped' on my diet and exercise......slowly getting back. Having some real problems with my knees- Patellar Subluxation- so impacts are quite painful and cause swelling. Grrr.
     
  9. bpa

    bpa Loaded Pockets

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    Paleo has worked pretty well for me. I'm not a fanatic about it, but dairy is pretty much gone from my diet, as are grains. That and exercise has worked for me. I don't buy into the Paleo hype, but cutting grains and dairy out has been effective. That's the real diet, regardless of what it is called.
     
  10. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    :eek: What, no ice cream?!?! Sounds fanatical to me, lol. Of course, I don't drink coffee, so, "Who's the odd man out now?"
     
  11. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    Deja vu all over again. Ironically, I just watched this from the same source.



    It's best to remain a curious student.
     
    Last edited by T.H.Cone, Dec 11, 2013
  12. T.H.Cone

    T.H.Cone I am senor Fluffy, hear me roar

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    Wow, three posts in a row. Clearly everyone is still totally inthralled with this thread. A bit saddened, I press on alone.:banghead:

    So, anyway, I just read an article on Fox's site entitled The REAL caveman diet: Research shows ancient man mainly ate tiger nuts. You'll have to google out yourself, of course, but I found this quote interesting because it begs the question, "Just how far are you hard core Paleo folks willing to go?"

    "They also provided a good source of nourishment for a medium-sized hominin with a large brain. This is why these hominins were able to survive for around one million years because they could successfully forage – even through periods of climatic change.

    But early man couldn't live on nuts alone, of course, and Fred Flintstone was likely no exception. These early relatives may have also sought additional nourishment from fruits and invertebrates, like worms and grasshoppers, the study concluded."

    Sounds yummy. So who among you is this commuted to the real pale diet?

    I also noted that they mentioned that cavemen were around during "climate change", which is weird, because I was unaware that there were cavemen around since the industrial revolution. But I digress.
     
  13. JustinJ
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner

    JustinJ Loaded Pockets

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    for anyone intrigued by this fitness guru convict, there's a biopic about him out there called "Bronson." It's sort of a crime-comedy, starring Tom hardy in the title role.
     
  14. ProjeKtWEREWOLF

    ProjeKtWEREWOLF Loaded Pockets

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    It's a fun movie...Charlie Bronson has written loads of really great books. My favourite is 'Insanity'...
     
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  15. KODIAKman

    KODIAKman EDC Junkie

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    I'm on my second round of the Whole 30. It is very Palo in nature. Basically for 30 days you eat veggies, fruits, meat (not processed), and nuts (-legumes, so no peanuts). It's pretty restrictive but after a week or two cravings go away and for me it works. I've had lot of gut issues the last year and they are almost all gone at this point. The first 30 days I lost 17 pounds and a few inches. This was all under the guidance of a doctor and coupled with I started working out three days a week. The only thing I really missed was beer so I allow myself one cheat day. Once a week, normally a weekend I'll have a few brews with the guys. I use quite a few recipes from pale cookbooks. It makes me feel better so I'm sticking with it.
     
  16. 0dBm

    0dBm Loaded Pockets

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    For the past five years, I have combined Pilates, cycling, and a plant-based diet. I am in the best shape that I have ever been in my entire life. Pilates has given me unprecedented flexibility and unbelievable core strength. Because of my advancing age, I do not run (ran track in high school) frequently and for sustained periods any longer. Cycling is much easier on the knees and it gives me ample cardio conditioning. A plant-based diet keeps my cholesterol and body fat to a minimum. I did bodybuilding during the late-70s to 1990. I am returning to that regimen and hope to sustain it for the remainder of my life. I have maintained my waist size for the past 30 years.

    My lifestyle has not been easy to maintain with the demands of schooling, career, marriage, and family over the years; however, my health remains at the VERY top because I could not have achieved and sustained those other four without it.