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ONE THING EVERY EDC'er SHOULD HAVE

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by Nate320, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Nate320

    Nate320 Loaded Pockets

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    Quik Clot!!!

    I don't care how big, or small, your EDC is, you need to keep this stuff handy. In todays day and age, shootings and mass casualty situations are a monthly occurrence. Ask yourself, can your current EDC first aid kit handle gunshot and other profusely bleeding wounds?

    You can purchase the sport version of Quik Clot on line from Cabelas here: http://www.z-medica.com/products/quikclot_ACSplus.asp

    If that isn't enough you can order other versions of this product at: http://www.z-medica.com/ordering/ordering.asp

    This is a great addition to everyone's EDC that could save someones life, and for a fairly cheap price


    Thanks,

    Nathan Rischling

    :luck:
     
  2. dudegalea

    dudegalea Empty Pockets

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    Good call. This stuff is really popular with the military, and definitely deserves a place in your EDC.

    Even in the less dangerous accidents, the sight of (seemingly) a lot of blood can be quite frightening to the injured person, so being able to stop the bleeding quickly will help alleviate that problem too. (I mean the kind of accidents that are serious and look scary, but are not obviously life-threatening.)
     
  3. Mud

    Mud Loaded Pockets

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    Cellox IS better from all ive been reading....

    Quick clot sometimes makes the wound worse because of the way it corterizes (SP) the capilaries shut
     
  4. Mr. kydex

    Mr. kydex Loaded Pockets

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    I've never heard of Cellox, Could you post a link?





    Thanks.
     
  5. Pantex

    Pantex Empty Pockets

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    I know ya meant Celox versus the concrete building forms Cellox . As well in my experience either or the quik clot work in the same manner. Point I want to make is if you carry this bring the granules and the impregnated bandage / sponge versions . The small quik clot bandage allows a lone person to be better able to perform a self aid as it is a real :censored: to pour the granules into a wound on back or in blind spot etc where one can stuff the clotting agent infused sponge / bandage into a cut or wound they can't see due visibility or hard to rear or pour into a wound.

    Remember a little goes a long way when using this stuff as well ! This stuff is a chemical version of the hot bowie knife one sees in the movies to stop a bleeder . Granules in most cases have to be surgically removed. Unless ya have a gusher that direct pressure will not stop don't use this stuff !!

    Stay safe !
     
  6. mikel81

    mikel81 Loaded Pockets

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    :ty:

    This really is a must have item, especially for a FAK. I will be ordering one or two as soon as I can put together enough items to justify paying to ship it. Although you can not put a price on life, so I should probably just order it.
     
  7. dudegalea

    dudegalea Empty Pockets

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    I found an interesting thread on another forum comparing the various products:

    http://forums.firehouse.com/showthread.php?t=89994

    From what they're saying, it sounds like the original version of QuikClot had a problem with causing burning around the wound (due to an exothermic reaction when the pad is applied), but the newer formulation doesn't have this problem.

    And here are some comments from a medical hemostat blog. Who knew such a thing existed? ;D
     
  8. ironraven

    ironraven Empty Pockets

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    In a car's FAK, a package of Celox, sure. I am very much a fan of Celox over QuikClot, due to QC's issues with moisture- I live in Vermont. Other than industrial accidents (I work in an office, not much risk there), the thing I'm most likely to come across is a car accident due to rain/snow/ice. *laughs* Not quite what works when the directions I got with early QuikClot was "first, remove all excess moisture".

    But for EDC, I don't know if it worth the expense vs probability of use when you think about the friction wear and tear that our on person gear experinces.
     
  9. dudegalea

    dudegalea Empty Pockets

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    I can see how that would be a problem up there! ;D
     
  10. molawns

    molawns Loaded Pockets

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    WOW, you sound like a Quick Clot salesman! :doh:

    Leave medical treatment to the professionals! If you happen to be the first responder to a patient bleeding, just use direct pressure until Paramedics or EMT's arrive...Let them handle it. I also agree with others, here...Celox seems to be a superior product.
     
  11. Nate320

    Nate320 Loaded Pockets

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    Being in emergency managment, and a first responder to large disasters and mass casualty situations I can say i would surley want someone by me that has this stuff. In Omaha, we recently had a mass casualty drill where the scenerio was a plane that crashed at an air show (we are preparing for our upcoming airshow). There were 143 wounded and 7 critically. It took all of the avaliable EMT's in the metro 56 minutes to treat and transport those people. Now Omaha is NOT a small Nebraska town with a volunteer fire department, we have many avaliable resources to respond to these situations and it still took almost an hour to get to the last person. Personally I wouldn't want to be laying on a tarmac bleeding out not being able to help myself or others. you can only hold a wound for so long. I will agree with waiting for EMT's when it is only one person and the response time for paramedics is fairly short. But being prepared for this kind of situation could be a lifesaver. I also have not heard of Celox until now and only have experiance with QuikClot, but will definatly look into the pros and cons of both products. But from my experiance it will definatly slow a bleeder! I am also not a salesman for QuikClot :lolhammer:. My point is, if you already have a heafty FAK, what is it gonna hurt adding this to it, and why not atleast TRY and assist if you see someone bleeding out? I hope this doesn't start controversy over good samaritan medical pratices :lolhammer:.

    Stay safe, and prepared,

    Nate

     
  12. El Verbo

    El Verbo Empty Pockets

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    I am definitely buying a case. Any more opinions from EMT's, doctors, such as Nate 320? Is this foolproof? Can just anyone apply it? Are there any drawbacks? Will it hinder ER treatment or have latent effects?
     
  13. randyha

    randyha Loaded Pockets

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    OK. I have a question for anyone in the know. I've considered carrying some of these quick clotting bandages. But, I've heard that they could cause problems in certain cases. Does anyone know when these should, should not be used?
     
  14. VVR41TH

    VVR41TH Empty Pockets

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    They're a last resort on the civilian side of medicine; in the military world, they're actually AFTER a tourniquet (if it's an extremity wound: bit hard to use a tourniquet on a gut shot, etc). Some people have previously mentioned that QC will "cauterize" wounds and actually burn the victims. That might have been true of the old, granular QuikClot, but the newer ACS/First Responder/Sport version works well below those sorts of temperatures (105 F). The other major problem that I've heard about of the old stuff is the very form it came in--granular; it would cause all sorts of problems for the SECOND responder and the surgeon who has to deal with the problem down the line.
    Celox has been proven to work more effectively in a couple of military trials (granted, we're talking about Celox being something like 25 times as effective as a pressure dressing alone versus QC being only 23 times as effective as the dressing), and it doesn't have the problem of clotting when it comes in contact with moisture, thus ruining the product; granted, I'm not sure what it is in blood that triggers the product, so I don't know if someone with an exotic blood disease/cancer could still use Celox (or QC for that matter). But, again, in less you're really likely to have a massive wound where the minor percentages that Celox gives you over QC, or you live in a really wet area (or work near water, etc, and might be forced to use the product in such a manner), QC will do what it needs to, and is quite a bit cheaper: QC Sport 25g, an entry level model, can be had for as low as $7 a package, while 15g of Celox (their entry level) is over double that, typically around $18. The only draw-back to the cheaper Sport as compared to a more expensive ACS or First Responder model of QC is that the sport doesn't provide the surgeon/second responder/etc with removal instructions on the package.
    Lastly, if anyone is considering saying "no" to hemostatics all-together, I'd recommend against it. Both Celox and QC have proven themselves to be able to completely stop a groin arterial bleed--something I'd pray never to have to attempt with just a pressure dressing and gauze. As the saying goes, "better to have it and not need it."
     
  15. vic2367

    vic2367 Loaded Pockets

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    ordering some right now for my edc fak


    many thanks
     
  16. Stutoffee

    Stutoffee Loaded Pockets

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    As I stated in another post, I hadnt heard of Quick Clot or Celox until I started "visiting" various preparedness forums such as EDCF.
    I appreciate that there will be differences from country to country, but are these sort of products generally available over-the-counter or do you need to find a tame GP (MDs in the Uk are known as General Practicioners - dunno if thats spelt correctly but its nearly 1.00am here ;D).
    Though I have no real need for a proper blow-out kit, I can definitely see the benefits of having stuff like this in a FAK.
    IF it is unavailable in the UK, does anyone out there fancy "swopping" some with me for kit that YOU find hard to get hold of?
     
  17. VVR41TH

    VVR41TH Empty Pockets

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    The only fun stuff that the UK has a lot more available than the US is super regulated in the US (certain pain killers, etc.).
     
  18. Bubba

    Bubba Loaded Pockets

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    I like good kit as well as anyone
    I'm an eagle scout, so I believe in being prepared
    I'm an ex-EMT (expired) as well, so I am a fan of first aid stuff

    When I first learned of Celox / Quick Clot I also became interested and started to acquire it for my kits
    and now I do have it in my 'trauma kits' that I carry with to gun training, hunting, etc

    but..

    I feel I should relate the full experience I've had with these two products over the years
    I almost always ask about it when I meet medical professionals because I'd like to feel better about it

    #1 if you read the directions for use, they are quite limited (for specific injuries as mentioned)
    #2 almost every EMT / Paramedic / Military Medic / Doctor I've talked to about it have been against it's use for the general (non military) population
    #3 every training class I've attended also suggests having it, but they rarely condone it's use (except for the specific injuries as mentioned) and then only with training and when it will help more than hurt the patient

    So I figured I'd add a post to encourage anyone who buys it to READ THE INSTRUCTIONS, it's no miracle item, and can cause more harm than good in many (most) situations where medical attention is close by (in town)

    We are talking EDC here (for the most part) and I'd hate to think someone is planning to use it a few minutes away from a hospital since it would probably be a real pain (literally) to remove from a wound
     
  19. VVR41TH

    VVR41TH Empty Pockets

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    While I haven't talked in depth with any paramedics/military medics/EMTs about hemostatics, a Navy field surgeon (who also does ER work in civilian life) that I deeply respect has used the stuff, and loves it--and I'm talking about the old, granular stuff, that could screw the patient up a lot more royally than any of the current generation hemostatics could even dream of. In his words, a "decent doc" shouldn't have to worry (much) about the removal of the stuff; his concern was more about the heat, something that's now been supposedly fixed. Now, this means a lot considering that's it coming from one of the people who had to deal with the problems that a hemostatic could cause, not a medic who's just using it to keep the patient alive. However, I still have reservations about the granular forms, as far as second-aid removal goes, but I think any of the "pouch" hemostatics (QC ACS, et al) wouldn't have that problem.
    This all being said, outside of military medicine or extreme civilian medicine (extreme as in you show up on a patient who's had a bisected femoral artery and has bled into unconsciousness, thus taking away any time for other measures), hemostatics are STILL a last resort, just like a tourniquet would be.
    EDIT: I just should note that I'm not an EMT or medic/corpsman; I'm looking into getting EMT-B, but right now, I only have a first responder cert.
    P.S. Eagle Scouts FTW.
     
  20. Stutoffee

    Stutoffee Loaded Pockets

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    Not true!
    WE have Tritium Glowrings readily available, too!! ;D