1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Newbie seeking gun advice

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by dml24, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. dml24

    dml24 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    514
    I am in the same situation as Kamm.

    Looking for that first EDC/self-defense gun.
    Since I am a newb, looking for recommended .22s to learn with and for practice.

    I am aware a .22 is not an ideal self-defense gun, but it would be better than no gun, and in most self defense situations I doubt a potential attacker is going notice what type of weapon might be pointing at him/her.

    Looking forward to all reommendations too come... thank you all!!
     
  2. Monty

    Monty Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    71
    I've got a Ruger SR22 and so far it has been very good to me. Nice understudy to a larger self-defense pistol.

    Recommended.

    And as soon as you feel comfortable, upgrade to an appropriate self defense caliber, you don't want to be relying on a .22 for self defense any longer than you have to.

    Be honest with yourself, if you only think you are going to buy or can only afford one pistol, go ahead and get a nice 9mm and skip the .22.
     
    MedusaOblongata and Ronin87 like this.
  3. swany66675
    • In Omnia Paratus

    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    38,512
    Ruger Mark III 22/45 it has a nice size to it and is just a blast to shoot, if you get board it easy to mod thousands of parts to mix to make it truly yours. This one is a 22/45 lite and its a ton of fun to play with, wish PA would change an arcane law and allow me to hunt with it.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    a35335, CSM-101, SAKplumber and 2 others like this.
  4. undert0e

    undert0e Empty Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    I could not agree with you more. I carry a Glock 19 as my daily carry and have for years.


    First be in the mindset that if you draw your weapon you are going to use it. Many states have serious repercussions for brandishing. Your intended target should never have enough time to realize your gun caliber. Just my $.02.

    I lived in Baltimore city for a number of years and my wife works in emergent surgical medicine. The lion share of GSW she dealt with were from shotguns or .22s. Believe me they can get the job done. Albeit not as effective as a larger caliber, a .22 pistol in the hands of an adept shooter should not be dismissed.
     
    Wolfhound0023 likes this.
  5. torogi

    torogi Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    31
    A .22 handgun is a good choice. I would go 9mm at least but my advise is take some handgun safety classes if you can. Before i bought my first gun i took 2 NRA handgun safety course and it did help a lot!

    I recommend glock for variety of reasons.
    1. Cheaper production gun
    2. It just run.. and run.
    3. They come full size, compact and sub-compact
    4. In those 3 sizes, they have 9mm, 40S&W and 45ACP and some more.
    5. The best part i believe is GSSF. Its a yearly competition (depending in you area) for all glock owners. No holster needed, just standing start low ready and start blasting after the start signal.

    Prizes are very good. You can win a gun, glock of course, some money. They do random drawings too for another gun. They have armorers on site to fix and replace OEM parts of your glock for free.

    I dont work for glock, not sponsored. I dont even shoot glock in competitions (USPSA). But the above is a common info in shooting world.

    Also if you are a GSSF member for 2 yrs, you get a voucher to purchase a glock for $425 (plus local tax and fee). EVERY YEAR as a member. Thats cheap.
     
  6. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2,142
    Likes Received:
    3,129
    A .22 is a good fun gun. Now that .22 ammo is available again ... you can shoot thousands of rounds and not spend a lot. They're good for getting the basic safety principles and operational mechanics down - especially if you purchase one that operates in the same manner as most other semi-automatic pistols. I would tend to agree, however, with those who've suggested moving to 9mm (perhaps even skipping the .22) as quickly as possible.

    Here's the reality of a self-defense scenario: If your pistol clears your holster, you should be putting rounds into your attacker immediately after. Pointing a gun at a "bad guy" is a good way to get slapped with a brandishing charge and/or have your firearm taken away from you and used against you. At "bad breath distance" if you hesitate for a second to shoot me, I'm going to take your gun away from you, probably break your strong side wrist in the process and most likely put a couple rounds in your cranium. Now, the average tweaker may not be able to do that, but you never know against whom you may be defending yourself.

    This is serious business! It is, quite literally, life or death. Which leads me back to the .22 vs. 9mm debate. Being intimately familiar with the firearm you will use if/when you need to defend yourself is of primary importance. This includes being able to handle the recoil and get second, third, fourth, etc. shots on target. Is your life worth the cost savings of .22 ammo vs. 9mm ammo?
     
    cowsmilk and riot like this.
  7. swany66675
    • In Omnia Paratus

    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    38,512
    I believe everyone should own atleast one 22 rifle and pistol they are just plane fun. If you ever get the chance to introduce another to shooting it becomes a cheap way to let someone else gain some experience.

    The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
     
  8. BklynBoy

    BklynBoy Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2013
    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    914
    There is nothing wrong with a .22 to learn the fundamentals and for less expensive practice than with 9/40/45, but it is not a good choice for SD. Handguns tend to retain their value very well, so if you cannot afford to keep the 22 and to also get a reasonable SD weapon, you can sell the .22 for about what you will buy it for.

    When I have taught people to shoot, I usually start them off on a .22 so they can learn the fundamentals without having to deal with the recoil of a "major" caliber. This does not take more than a few sessions and then, if they want to learn to shoot a handgun for SD, part of what they need to learn is how to shoot well while managing recoil; this is something that you cannot do with a .22. So, you actually might find that the best thing to do is pick an instructor who can supply you with firearms for training and use his .22 for the first few sessions before you graduate to a larger, SD caliber.

    As a newbie, especially one who is interested in firearms for self defense, who you choose as an instructor is more important than which firearm you purchase first. Your initial instruction should include firearms safety, firearms marksmanship and firearms/SD law. Pick a class with a low student to instructor ratio. The lectures can be done in larger groups, but you want personalized attention for the firearms handling portions of the class (no more than 4:1). Use this forum or one of the major firearms forum to get recommendations for good instruction where you live. Finally, be aware that there are many people who can do a very good job of teaching you how to shoot, but are not well qualified to teach you the law of self defense. Assuming you do not have the budget to be taught by Mas Ayoob (who is a great instructor on both aspects), do yourself a favor and buy or borrow a copy of Mas's book "In the Gravest Extreme" (I'll even lend you my copy). Also, a very good book on SD law is this new one for lay people "The Law of Self Defense" by Andrew Branca, a SD lawyer.

    BTW, another good choice is the S&W M&P .22. It is the same size as the full sized S&W M&P pistols and even fits in the same holsters, so it is perfect for practice
     
  9. paaiyan

    paaiyan Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Messages:
    437
    Likes Received:
    477
    I would agree getting a .22 version of a popular SD pistol, such as the S&W M&P .22 or Walther P22, both of which are solid platforms.
     
    BklynBoy likes this.
  10. David123

    David123 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    7
    This!

    My first gun was a glock 19 and I found it perfectly easy to learn the fundamentals of shooting and quickly hit a high level of competence without ever firing a 22.

    I have since shot a 22, a Ruger Mark III, which was lots of fun! But for self defense you need something larger. If you did buy the 22 I feel that you would quickly graduate to a larger gun. So you need to ask yourself if you will shoot often enough to practice with your self defense gun and the 22 to make it worth the investment in the 22.

    My advise, go to a range an rent a selection of guns in various calibers. I'm sure you will find the 9mm manageable, and this will mean that you can, if you choose, buy just one gun and focus all your time on learning to shoot on that gun.
     
  11. dml24

    dml24 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2013
    Messages:
    755
    Likes Received:
    514
    Monty, Swany66675, Mudinyeri, Torogi and all thank you for the recommnedations, cautions and advice.

    I will have to give some thought and look at the dollar difference between a .22 and 9mm. I have more than a few coworkers who are shooters of handguns and rifles. Similar advice received. I will also learn more about Glocks, Rugers and others gun recommnedations.

    I know why I like this site so much, great advice from people who are prepared.
     
    GohawnFG and swany66675 like this.
  12. Garen Osborn

    Garen Osborn Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2013
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    27
    Last time I saw 22lr it was nearly as expensive as 9mm. So it doesn't make sense from an economics standpoint to go 22 right now.

    If you've got your heart set on a 22 I would get the smith and wesson m&p in 22, then transition to one in 9mm or 45 later. Skip the 40 in my opinion.

    Broadcast via Jedi mind tricks
     
  13. Chimay

    Chimay Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2012
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    754
    Depending on what your budget is, there are several larger caliber guns that offer .22 conversion barrels. This way you can learn and practice with the gun you would shoot in a SD situation and be able to shoot cheaper ammo. The downside is you will spend an extra few hundred dollars on top of your gun purchase to get the conversion parts and a few spare mags. You just swap the barrel and magazine and you are ready to go in most cases.

    Just another route you could go.



    Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk
     
    swany66675 likes this.
  14. swany66675
    • In Omnia Paratus

    swany66675 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    38,512
    I like the idea of conversion barrels for SD guns and if you think you may go this route there are lots of options. It usually takes a minute or so to switch calibers and it makes you more proficient with your carry gun.
     
  15. David123

    David123 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    7
    There is a 9mm to 22 kit for the Glock 19 if you decide to go this route.
     
  16. StJimmyS21

    StJimmyS21 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    111
    Also a fan of the Glock line here(carry a 19 off duty/17 on duty) Modern ammunition does a pretty good job of leveling the playing field in terms of terminal ballistics. There are a lot of great rounds that expand predictably and maintain their weight while passing into or through a target. Ultimately, the question comes down to what gun can you handle comfortably under crappy circumstances. Crappy circumstances meaning strong hand only, support hand only, in the dark, at various ranges, cold, wet and miserable. Table-top your day, then apply the worst conditions you could possibly find yourself in. Fights don't always happen on sunny square ranges, and they occur with little warning. I understand that this sounds dramatic, but if you are looking for a weapon to carry, these are things you should think about.

    Anyway, back to your question: I prefer Glocks. Simple, efficient and to the point, with lots of accessories if you feel like dressing it up. My advice in choosing a firearm would be to crowdsource your friends and family. Know someone who has a khar, or kimber, S&W, or Glock? Fork over the cash for a box of rounds, and see if you can give it a try.

    Hell, if you find yourself in the SW Michigan area, look me up. I'd be happy to let you test run mine.
     
  17. BubbaFett
    • In Omnia Paratus

    BubbaFett Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    3,278
    Crazy, I was thinking along both of these lines. Glock 19 is what I chose for my first gun (within the last couple of months). I have not been able to find .22LR but if it becomes more available I may look into that conversion kit for plinking.

    Good luck and thanks to everyone else for the collateral advice!
     
  18. BklynBoy

    BklynBoy Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2013
    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    914

    The high price of .22 in contrast to 9mm is a recent historical anomaly. I expect (hope) that ammo prices go back down and that .22 in particular drops significantly back down to something closer to its historical levels
     
    BubbaFett likes this.
  19. StealthChaser13

    StealthChaser13 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    8
    I started with handguns within the last year. I started with a 9mm, and had no issues. SO, while a .22 is a good choice of a gun to learn how to shoot, don't be afraid to start a little bigger.
     
  20. TheSmallWonder

    TheSmallWonder Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2013
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Glock is way overrated... They are the Kimber of 1911's
     
    MCPOWoller likes this.