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My vehicle FAK

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by Safety1st, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    I don’t think I’ve ever taken a photo of my FAK before - so here goes.

    This is my FAK which I carry in the boot/trunk of my car.

    There’s a mixture of catastrophic bleed kit; CAT tourniquet, SWAT tourniquet, CELOX etc.

    Burn packs. Eye irrigation etc.

    Some other kit that I think is unusual, but I think is a must; an hospital/ambulance style blanket (as I find most first aid situations either require someone being covered up, or someone needing something under their head).

    Also some hardware gloves (mechanix) as the situations aren’t always easy accessible.

    Finally a head torch - also because situations aren’t always in the daytime.

    Any thoughts or recommendations for me ?

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  2. TheViking

    TheViking Loaded Pockets

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    Something to immobilize the neck or brace a limb maybe good, if not already covered with your kit. Also something I recommend is if you are working from the side of the road or on the road a safety vest with reflective material.


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  3. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    Hi - thanks for the reply. Yeah - I've a few hi-viz vests in my trunk/boot, just didn't put them in the photo. You're absolutely right though - it would be madness to try to render first aid and then risk being a casualty yourself.

    The neck/limb immobilisation I've only recently acquired - a rolled/folded sort of affair of sponge that has some thin metal inside to ensure rigidity. Im not overly impressed with it, and perhaps need to look for another.
     
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  4. TJones

    TJones Empty Pockets

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    [QUOTE="Safety1st, post: 2700726, member: 11952]The neck/limb immobilisation I've only recently acquired - a rolled/folded sort of affair of sponge that has some thin metal inside to ensure rigidity. Im not overly impressed with it, and perhaps need to look for another.[/QUOTE]

    Sounds like a SAM splint which is a cracking piece of kit for immobilising limbs and, at a push, c-spine. Get some cohesive bandage wrap and you're golden.

    In all honesty I think carrying anything more than that for neck injury (i.e. neck brace) is overkill, there's multiple sizes and if there's no complaint of neck injury paramedics tend not to put them on.

    Better off getting a bystander supporting the neck with their hands until ambo turns up and you doing the rest of your checks.

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    #4 TJones, Aug 19, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
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  5. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    That looks really comprehensive and well thought out.
    My only thought is if it's your vehicle that's hit, especially if you get rear ended, is you might not be able to open the trunk. Can you reach it from inside the vehicle? If not, I'd suggest maybe carrying a tq somewhere you can reach from the drivers seat as well as the main bag. I hav' a small ifak velcro mounted to the back of the passenger headrest so it can be reached from anywhere in the car
     
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  6. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    Hi Mate - yes, that's a good point. I'd not considered that.

    My particular vehicle is a saloon and doesn't allow access to the trunk/boot from anything other than the outside. So I may leave a small trauma pack in the internal passenger section.

    Thanks for that tip.
     
  7. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    tourniquet shoud be out of the wrapper, staged and moved to the outside of the bag in a individual pouch. When you need it, you need it as fast as possible.
    Neck collar makes no sense in a kit like this.
     
  8. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    Yes- the CAT-T out of the wrapper makes good sense... thanks

    The neck collar item - is because where I live is quite remote. So in the event of coming across a vehicle collision, we can be 30-60 minutes away from a paramedic/EMS arriving.
     
  9. TJones

    TJones Empty Pockets

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    Neck collar is still excessive in my opinion. I live in mid Wales, ambulance response times are a joke, better to have bystander support c-spine than carry collars. Just out of curiosity have you had training with neck injuries?

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  10. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    Disagree. Ive been a paramedic since 2003, and we don't place c-collars because of neck pain, we place them based on mechanism of injury. I've personally seen patients come in who denied neck pain so EMS (who should've known better) didn't place a collar, only to discover the patient either had cervical fractures or a head bleed. I've seen it more than a few times.

    Also, having an untrained person hold c-spine is an expedient at best. If a trained person isn't there to assist they could do more harm than good.
     
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  11. TJones

    TJones Empty Pockets

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    By all means as soon as EMS turns up put the collars on, I’m not disagreeing with that at all, it’s at the paras discretion. In the case of first on scene I think that carrying collars in your kit is overkill, maintaining neutral alignment and supporting c-spine should be priority.

    To put a collar on you need 2 people trained in managing spinals which is highly unlikely, so you’re likely to need to use a bystander just to maintain it. It’s not an overly complicated thing and can be taught on the fly.

    You need to decide at what point does your vehicle FAK become a response bag.


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  12. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    I think I misread/misinterpreted the part about bystanders holding c-spine while you continue assessment. However by that logic you could also put on a c-collar with that 2nd person. I do agree about having a vehicle FAK vs response bag. You need to decide what you want it to be. Personally I feel like the OP's bag is more like a response kit, but that could be simply based on his choice of bag.
     
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  13. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    Hi. Yeah, I get what you mean by excessive.. I’m a sort of “better to have and not need than need and not have” sort of guy, even for first aid kits. The neck collar roll thing I’ve got was only a few quid and was primarily bought as a splint for arm injuries, with the collar option secondary.

    Regarding your question about training, yeah I’m first aid trained and have been first at scenes of lots of collisions, due to the job I was in for 20 years .. always like to learn more and be better equipped though.

    Thanks for your post and for helping this thread. It’s appreciated mate.
     
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  14. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    Yes mate - it was an inexpensive bag bought empty, that I’ve then filled. The size and the fact it’s easily accessible was the reason behind the choice.
     
  15. TJones

    TJones Empty Pockets

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    Best mentality to have



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  16. Safety1st

    Safety1st Loaded Pockets

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    I’m interested in the fundamental differences between the two for the private citizen carried in their car.

    Our medic friend on this thread also made reference to it , so there must be something more than I’m thinking. Can you expand a bit more please ?
     
  17. TJones

    TJones Empty Pockets

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    I think it’s subjective and depends on the individual.

    In my opinion gear that covers DR ABC/SMARCH is first aid/basic life saving. Once you get onto managing c-spine, monitoring obs, etc you’ve moved beyond BLS.

    In no way is that a negative thing at all. The more gear (and training to go with it) you have the better quality of care you can provide. Just make sure you top up what you’ve used when the ambo turns up!

    I’m happy to carry BLS plus a few comfort items because my boot/trunk has limited space and I have a small family to taxi around.


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  18. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    I think at the fundamental level, the difference between a vehicle FAK and a response bag is a large first aid kit versus something you'd expect an EMT to jump off an ambulance with. A first aid kit is just that, essentially a boo-boo kit with bandages, some acetaminophen or other pain/fever relief. Whereas a response bag is something intended to support Basic Life Support and is set up for actual patient assessment: BP cuff, stethoscope, BVM, some basic meds like aspirin, glucose, etc. (depending on one's State and local protocols), more advanced splinting and bleeding control.That's not to say you couldn't find some of these in a vehicle first aid kit, it's just that there seems to be a perceived difference in the level of care one can provide.
     
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  19. thekapow

    thekapow EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    a head bleed? you mean a situation where ICP (increased intracranial pressure) is very much likely and a cervical collar is know to dramatically worsen the patient outcome?
    - When even professionals cant get it right.
     
  20. ffmedic245

    ffmedic245 Loaded Pockets

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    No, I mean a situation in which mechanism of injury and prehospital protocol dictates placement of a collar, because CT scans aren't available in the field. That isn't to say that the collar wouldn't be removed in the ED once CT results come back. At least in the State where I live, only doctors can clear c-spine. The subject of this thread hs been pre-hospital, and that's what I'm talking about..