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Motorbike kit

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by damsdv, Apr 26, 2018.

  1. damsdv

    damsdv Empty Pockets

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    I am after some advice.

    Looking at getting a decent sized medical bag to put into my motorbike side pannier/saddle bag. I have an Indian Roadmaster.

    What I am looking for is either a roll out ‘tool roll’ type bag or something like the ‘M3’ trifold medic bag. I carry a large number of items for use on country rides and group rides. The only time I have needed a kit was when I didn’t have it.
    I currently carry BVM, Airways (NPA and OPA) large number of wound dressings (Commercial version of FFD)Sam splints, various gauze, dressings, bandages. Saline, plasters, burn dressings, casualty blankets (the small silver ones) pain killers etc etc. Currently they are in a couple of different bags in the left side pannier ( In Australia the left side is the curb side so away from the road)
    I have looked at the trifold ‘M3’ medic bag but not sure how big it is as I cant get my hands on one to see and I don’t want to pay for something that will not work. I am also thinking about the roll up type bag that would make access to the gear easier.
    Open to advise and criticism.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  2. volvoboy

    volvoboy Loaded Pockets

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    The roll-up bags are nice, but I don't think your BVM will fit in one. It's hard to advise you on the M3 bag because I can't tell how much equipment you have (although it sounds like a lot). The nice part about the M3 bag is that it is multi-compartmented, so you can get a bunch of stuff in, but it is still a "medium" sized bag (8x7x8 according to one website). One thought (although you might have already done this) is to look at as many websites as possible that offer a fully loaded M3 bag to get an idea of how much stuff it can hold compared to how much you have. Look at Doom and Bloom and see what they can fit into their kit: http://store.doomandbloom.net/medium-survival-trauma-carry-kit/

    Hope this is helpful.
     
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  3. JIM
    • +3 Supporter

    JIM Loaded Pockets

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  4. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    No tourniquet? Motorcyclists are at a fairly high risk of severe limb damage, including traumatic amputations.
     
  5. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    I'd even be inclined to attach a TQ to the tank bag if you have one, or the outside of your panniers for quick access. I used to keep one in my top jacket pocket because my bike had no storage and I didn't carry panniers
     
  6. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    If you don't have training/the know-how when to use (and more importantly not to use) a tourniquet you should not own one.

    And honestly, traumatic amputations? Do you often see those around you? I have been an avid motorcyclist since i was allowed to drive one, been a member of a few clubs (with plenty retarded members doing stupid things) and have had plenty friends crash with everything from a simple bruise to pulverised hips/brain damage but ive never witnessed an accident where a tourniquet would have made any difference whatsoever. Is your country/area just so much more unsafe or do motorcyclist not wear proper personal protection?
     
  7. thegrouch314

    thegrouch314 Loaded Pockets

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    IMO, there's not much a bystander can do for crush injuries but a high speed crash with lots of metal flying around? Seems like some sort of heavy bleeding could occur and even proper gear can't absolutely protect you. A tourniquet can help. It makes sense to me to carry one.

    I agree about proper training though, that's the most important thing
     
  8. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    Well obviously one shouldn't carry one if one doesn't have the knowledge on how to use it properly. But take a look at the list the OP presents, it includes both a BVM, NPAs and OPAs. These are items that requires about the same or higher level of training as a tourniquet.
    You haven't seen it, therefore it doesn't happen?

    Yes, I've seen plenty of traumatic amputations, I'm a nurse in trauma orthopedics. Everything from car accidents to work place accidents, chainsaws and crush injuries, everything from fingers to femurs. I can recall at least two cases where a traumatic amputation occured while riding a bike and where a tourniquet was applied, in one case it was a bike vs large car and in the other it was bike vs guard wire. In both cases tourniquets were applied by first responders.

    It happens, simple as that and it makes sense to carry tourniquets if you carry other medical equipment.

    Regarding personal protection there's nothing that really can prevent the kind of damage that would warrant a tourniquet (in the case of motorcycles).
    I would too, if I rode a bike. I don't but I carry tourniquets anyway.
     
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  9. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    That's not what i said. I don't carry things with me on the one in a million chance something might happen (just imagine the stuff you'd have to carry around if you did), I choose my gear on the likelihood that ill actually need it and that puts a tourniquet pretty far down the list. You are a professional and you have literally seen it happen twice, if anything that tells me enough about the urgency of carrying one. Seeing traumatic injuries on a daily basis as part of your job is quite far from reality for most people.
     
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  10. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    This is not about what you carry, my question was regarding the OP's kit which is (presumably) more advanced than your kit. You questioned that traumatic amputations happened in motorbike accidents and yes, they do. With a frequency higher than you realize. I've worked in orthopedics for two years, during that time I've seen two cases where I know a tourniquet was used. As for amputations (traumatic and secondary) in motorcycle accidents they are far higher than that.

    The likelihood of needing to use a tourniquet is low, but the consequences of not having one when it's needed is extremely profound. Which is why I carry tourniquets on a daily basis. In addition the OP's kit contains other fairly advanced medical gear and it makes zero sense to not carry a tourniquet with that. Which is why I asked my original question.

    What do you carry in your medical kit?
     
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  11. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    My motorcycle medical kit is quite basic (by no means a trauma kit) as space is very limited on my bike. Your basic gloves, band-aids, gauze, elastic and non elastic dressing, two pair #1 and #2 quick dressing, heat blanket, alcohol, tools and some small stuff (aspirin/skin-glue/sugar/sunscreen etc.). Its my big boo-boo kit. On official tour-rides we usually have a dedicated medic with a proper bag and training.
     
  12. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    Sounds reasonable.
    Does your medic carry tourniquets?
     
  13. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    I actually had to google that, as far as im aware its a dutch 'bhv' certified case. They do not have tourniquets.