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Making Knives.

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Liberteer, Mar 16, 2014.

  1. Liberteer

    Liberteer Loaded Pockets

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    Something I have wanted to do for a long time now..but have never done it. have no idea where to even begin. any advice or helpful hints as to where to start?
     
  2. Curse The Sky

    Curse The Sky Loaded Pockets

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    IMO, start with something that's already "somewhat" built. Start with a large file or a farrier's rasp. You can learn to anneal it so that you can grind it into a basic shape, then heat treat it, sharpen it, and finally temper it. You can either do a basic paracord grip, or make your own scales out of wood, micarta, etc.
     
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  3. MJGEGB

    MJGEGB Loaded Pockets

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    First things first figure out how you plan to handle the heat treat. This will determine the steel you can work with. If you plan to do it yourself go with 1084 high carbon steel. It Ia's the easiest and most forgiving steel to work with. If you plan to send it out then find a place to work with and make sure they can HT the steel you pick out.

    You will need a drill, a good single cut bastard file, needle files, hack saw, and sand paper. A belt sander will make things a whole lot easier but the drill is the only needed power tool.
     
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  4. krprice84

    krprice84 Loaded Pockets

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    Sorry for the naive question but what is the drill for? Or is this for making a folder? I'd think a fixed blade is definitely easier to make for your first one no? Don't understand the drill part but I've never made a knife yet either.

    What about an angle grinder though to get it closer to final shape? Is there a reason you wouldn't want to do that? Or a plasma torch? I've got both and curious if I could do that or if there's a reason that's not recommended?
     
  5. NOT-A-FAN

    NOT-A-FAN Loaded Pockets

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    a drill would be to make holes to attach the handle materials. i have been interested in this subject as well. i have seen some companies that provide knife blanks some are even heat treated and all you have to do is add grind, finish and handle scales. may be the best way to go starting out
     
  6. FenixArcher

    FenixArcher EDC Junkie!!!

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    Where to first begin is to figure out what tools you have available to work with.
    You could start out working with not much more than a hammer, a dremel, and a couple files, but it's best to have as many tools and as much workspace as you can.
     
  7. SpyderPrepper

    SpyderPrepper Loaded Pockets

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    Your basic steps for making a simple carbon steel, forged, fixed blade knife: anneal, shape and grind, harden past critical temperature (the point where steel is no longer magnetic), quench, sand off resulting black layer, temper, sand and polish again, finish the blade, affix the handle, sharpen, make a sheath.

    There a ton of other factors, such as what to use for a quench, extra sources of carbon, differential tempering, health and safety hazards, forge types etc.

    Finally, and this is just my opinion, if you don't heat treat it yourself you are not a knife maker, merely an assembler. I work in the knife/outdoor industry and I continually talk to so called "makers" and none of them heat treat or forge their steel. They get someone else to do it all and then slap on some scales and strut like a peacock. Note, I'm not saying this is a bad place to start.
     
  8. Minibear453
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner

    Minibear453 Loaded Pockets

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  9. batteur
    • GITD Manix 2XL Owner
    • In Omnia Paratus

    batteur Loaded Pockets

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    I plan to make knives, too. I bought some SB1 steel from Jürgen Schanz (his signature alloy) and plan to have it heat treated by him, since he offers it and knows his steel.
    I also bought some scales material, and have a cherry root drying in the garage since two years.
    I have a few files, but need at least one additional big flat one. I can use my father’s workshop, but it’s more suited for working with wood than metal. A drill press and saws etc. are already there. And last year I bought a Dremel 4000 in anticipation of beginning soon. :rolleyes:

    Here’s a video about how to make a filing jig for shaping the blade:
     
  10. Birchwood

    Birchwood Loaded Pockets

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    I've been making knives for a couple years now. A decent sander will be one of the most helpful tools. Even a cheapie 1by30" or a 4by36 will help you more then you expect. I made my first nine blades with not much more then a 4by36, and some hand tools. I would recommend scanning Craigslist for a decent sander to assist in shaping your blades and getting a decent grind. Also, do yourself a favor and go to harbor freight and stock up on some steel clamps and some quick grip clamps- they're cheap as dirt there, and hold up pretty well. Another tool that is a must is a decent bench vise. One of my first, with some hand pressed micarta: [​IMG]
     
  11. Birchwood

    Birchwood Loaded Pockets

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    Another bit of advice: this hobby thrives off of your own creativity. Look at the tools you own, and what they can do for you. And just go for it! You'll learn as you go, you really don't need much to get going, and as you go you will learn what you need to push your hobby forward. Once you get started, you will realize that much of what you need- you can make yourself, or modify an existing tool you own. If I can be of any assistance, feel free to message me.
     
  12. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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