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Looking for that not-quite EDC lamp.

Discussion in 'Flashlights & Other Illumination Devices' started by el_murdoque, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Donald

    Donald Loaded Pockets

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    That reminds me that I have done it similarly. I had two rubber tourniquet straps with velcro on them which I used ot attach a light on a bicycle. Worked fine at the time, but later the rubber in the straps broke down so there went that option.

    Glad to hear there are other similar bicycle light mounts out there, I just mentioned the ones I knew of and had used.

    Your question posed by this thread reminded me of a YouTube video by EverydayTacticalVids called My Car Emergency Lights: Thrunite Catapult V6 & TC20 - A Thrower and A Flood Light.
    He made some good points; I think he may have also mentioned a headlamp, but don't recall for sure. I should add some flashlights to my car. I don't think the crank flashlight I have in there now holds a charge any longer. I would just utilize something I already have. I have not worried too much as I always have at least one EDC on me and if on a trip would have more. Something I don't mind risking if valet parking my car or having it serviced.
     
  2. el_murdoque

    el_murdoque Loaded Pockets

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    You mentioned earlier that you have many Olights. I had to service my car recently - in a dark parking lot of the DIY store where I bought what I needed. I popped the hood and fixed my S1RII's magnetic tail to the hood and had a perfect working light.
    When working on a car, a magnetic tail really comes in handy. Maybe the H1R Nova is a good option.

    The lights I keep in my car are only AA or AAA lights - I know that if I used Lithium cells, they'd be empty the day I need them.
     
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  3. Donald

    Donald Loaded Pockets

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    Good to hear the S1R Baton II worked for you. Gratifying like hearing those how my SAK* saved the day stories. (Swiss Army Knife).

    Before the Baton II came out I probably carried the NW H1R Nova more than the S1R Baton. I'm hoping they have something big in the works like they do with the H2R. If not I imagine there may be a NW H1R Nova around. An excellent headlamp. With headband 2.6 oz.

    Would you mind expanding on the point you make in your last sentence. I do not understand it. Primary lithium cells probably are among the best at withstanding the temperatures in a vehicle. My preference would be to have a rechargeable battery I could periodically charge in the car, that also took a primary lithium just in case.

    I may put a headlamp in my car, but wonder how the headband will hold up in the heat here in Miami, FL. I have a Sunwayman T20CC I intended for the car, but never seem to put it there. It would also serve as an escape tool with its tungsten steel points mounted in the bezel. I'm getting up now to put it in our car. :)
     
  4. el_murdoque

    el_murdoque Loaded Pockets

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    I meant that lithium cells have a tendency to be empty when I need them while NiMh cells last while not in use.
     
  5. BigGreenTick

    BigGreenTick Loaded Pockets

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    That really shouldn't be the case. It's possible you've left them in lights that have high parasitic drain. If that's the case 'locking out' (cutting the connection by slightly unscrewing a tailcap) will solve the issue.
     
  6. Donald

    Donald Loaded Pockets

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    I'm glad to hear that the "Precharged," "hybrid," "ready-to-use," or "low self-discharge" batteries are working for you. Those are the only batteries I use in AA or AAA taking electronics; with primary lithium batteries (Energizer) reserved for backup or special use. I virtually never use Alkaleaks anymore. I have lost too many electronics/flashlights to Duraleaks and Kirkleaks to use them any longer.

    You must be talking about rechargeable lithium batteries...which is what I mostly use. I'm not sure of the shelf life. I suspect it may be around 6 months although I am reasonably certain at least some of mine have gone far longer. Perhaps BigGreenTick has more exact figures. Also BigGreenTick has a good point, for those flashlights which you can use a mechanical lockout, i.e. a small twist of the cap/barrel, that will avoid any parasitic drain and prevent any accidental activation of the flashlight.

    Primary lithium batteries have a long shelf life. I just bought some Energizer AA batteries and the expiration date is 2039. Most CR123A batteries should last 10 years. Many now just give a date of manufacture, but I had some remaining Surefire CR123A batteries that expired in 2014 and if I am not still using one, I was until recently. A couple would no longer work, but the others did. So the good thing about 18650 lithium rechargeable using lights is that you can generally use 2 x CR123A primary batteries as backup. So if you keep a rechargeable RCR123 or 18650 flashlight in your car you have two possibilities that it will work: recharging it in the car or dropping in one or two CR123A batteries you have safely stored in an appropriate holder.

    I assume you know, but for those who don't, never store any type of lithium batteries loose, they can short from metal contact and cause a fire. IIRC I read of someone who had a bag of used loose 9-volt batteries to throw away and the contacts got shorted and they caught on fire.
     
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  7. BigGreenTick

    BigGreenTick Loaded Pockets

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    I definitely should have made sure we were on the same page regarding which lithium cells we're talking about. As Donald pointed out I'm referring to lithium primaries both 3v CR123 or 1.7v Energizer AA/AAA sized cells. Rechargable LiIon cells do have a self discharge rate upwards of 3% (greater at higher temps) per month.

    Mea culpa for making assumptions & thanks Donald for clarifying!
     
  8. el_murdoque

    el_murdoque Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for a valuable lesson in cells. I was unaware that non rechargeable lithium cells existed (even though I've used many in the form of CR123 and various other, more exotic ones).

    In my narrow vision, Lithium cells were the rechargeable ones that leak their capacity over time while NiMh were the AA and AAA cells that
    kept their current until they literally started leaking.
     
  9. BigGreenTick

    BigGreenTick Loaded Pockets

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    Remember that the older formulation NiMh self discharge even faster than LiIon rechargables. Eneloops were the first LSD (low self discharge) NiMh cells, other brands have LSD cells available (often made in the same factory as Eneloops) but always check.

    Alkalines are the only ones that literally leak and should generally be avoided anymore.
     
  10. el_murdoque

    el_murdoque Loaded Pockets

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    I will do some reading up on that topic.