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Looking for REAL point and shoot

Discussion in 'Electronic Devices' started by clock, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. EZDog

    EZDog EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    I love my G10 and carry it around everywhere!
     
  2. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    They still shoot decent enough pics for their age, here's a random shot from my last camping trip. G12 shooting a dragonfly on a guy-line in the wind (hence the slight out-of-focus);
    [​IMG]
    Still not too bad for a compact little thing...
     
    Moshe ben David and EZDog like this.
  3. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    I just want my pictures to "take" quickly and come out level. I don't know the photography jargon.

    My phone camera takes forever to capture a picture after I push the button. I could seriously knit a scarf in the time it takes so most pics are blurred. And they're never level. My 7.x megapixel Sony Cybershot from 2007 works better than my ultra hot idk how many megapixel computer phone pictures.
     
  4. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Well, the smaller the camera lens the less light will come through so the longer it will take the camera to collect enough light to take a pic. Sensitivity ofc also has quite a big role to play in this (modern cameras even cellphones are actually quite sensitive) but its still hard to beat the larger size of a more proper camera. So more light and/or bigger lens, higher sensitivity and faster processing behind it all to do the work will reduce start-up time and the actual time it takes to 'make' a picture (less blurriness).

    Pics never being level im afraid is user fault. Even the most expensive cameras will take un-level shots if the camera is not level. There's post-processing steps to 'fix' this, it will rotate the pic a bit and cut the edges off to get it back for square but you risk losing sharpness in the image. But best solution here is to just keep the camera straight.
     
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  5. ArkansasFan30

    ArkansasFan30 Loaded Pockets

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    Thanks for the info on the lens and light. I knew the unlevel aspect was my fault. I guess I just hoped a good point and shoot might have some kind of indicator to tell you if the camera is level.
     
  6. Westerdutch

    Westerdutch Loaded Pockets

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    Oh, actually many cameras do have that...i thought for a second there you were looking for correction after the fact. Even my old g12 features a level indicator. Mobile phones have that ability too (they have an accelerometer after all). You may have to dig through a menu or two but i think most modern cameras nowadays have this standard.
     
    ArkansasFan30 likes this.
  7. Alex-

    Alex- Empty Pockets

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    The Panasonic Lumix cameras that have been mentioned are absolutely fantastic. I've got a DMC-FX01, over ten years old but the battery still holds a decent charge, it boots quickly and the autofocus is really fast. In daylight it'll be ready and in focus before you are (about a second), and it's pretty darn decent in low light conditions as well.

    I've also had a cheaper version (cheaper, not cheap) in the Lumix series. I bought it to replace this one. It had worse picture quality in low light conditions, worse video quality, slower auto focus... But absolutely amazing photos in daylight, and 10x zoom. Sadly, it died after about seven years. So I'd recommend to look at the more expensive models. They won't be that expensive, so I'd say the money you save isn't worth it.

    Although, I must admit that I've mostly moved to the iPhone completely now that the raw photo apps are actually decent. I only use the point-and-shoot or the DSLR when I want to shoot something special, going on vacation, or going somewhere I'd prefer not flashing a relatively expensive phone when taking pictures.
     
  8. outbackwack

    outbackwack Loaded Pockets

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    I have an older EOS 40D and a G15 that both take great pics, but ever since I got my Galaxy Note 5 I've used that for taking pics because it takes tremendously good pictures. I may be selling the G15 because of that, although I do have the filter ring adapter on the G15 that is a really nice feature to have. I am a Canon guy... tried a Nikon and it just wasn't as good in my opinion. Lots of choices out there. Depends I what you are going to do with the pics afterwards. I just email and archive for future viewing.

    Outbackwack
     
  9. Alex-

    Alex- Empty Pockets

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    How's this for a coincidence? My daughter has never been interested in photography other than being in front of the camera, but two hours ago she asked me if she could have one because she wanted to take some pictures. So now the Lumix that I mentioned in my post yesterday have a new owner...
     
  10. SlyFerret

    SlyFerret Loaded Pockets

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    I carry a Panasonic Lumix in my bag. Mine is probably about 5 years old now, but it takes great photos. I also like that it has a full manual mode and can shoot raw, so I can get into more advanced photography without having to lug around our big DSLR.

    Sent from my Nexus 9 using Tapatalk
     
  11. Spartan857

    Spartan857 Loaded Pockets

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    Sony RX100V all the way. And this one must have accessory.

     
  12. Aeteocles

    Aeteocles Empty Pockets

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    Hi all! My very first post on EDCF!

    It's really hard to make a camera recommendation without discussing a little about what makes a camera "good." Ultimately, a good camera is one that is capable of producing a 1) sharp image 2) of the things you want in focus 3) with a dynamic range that looks natural to the eye 4) at the moment that you want it to. Every feature on a camera is simply a tool to help you achieve these 4 elements: A camera that is too big gets left behind and isn't there for you at the right moment, or a camera with poor sensor creates grainy images in low light, and so on.

    So, first and foremost, you have to decide what size camera you are willing to carry. You say "point-and-shoot", but that describes the way a camera operates, not it's size. For all intents and purposes, the fanciest DSLR on "auto" is also a point-and-shoot. A camera that isn't on your body is of little use to you--and while I normally would steer people towards something small to carry, I recognize that this is an EDC forum and you might be willing to carry something a little bigger that might fit in your EDC bag if you have one. Generally, I place cameras into 4 size categories: Shirt Pocket, Coat Pocket, Shoulder Strap, Camera Bag. The tiniest cameras, like the Canon S120 will fit into your shirt pocket, while something like the Sony RX100 or Canon G7X would be something more suitable for a coat pocket. Mirrorless cameras and small DSLRs, because of their shape, tend to live on a strap or at the bottom of your backpack or bag. Camera bag cameras would be a full size DSLR that would typically live in a camera bag until it's ready to come out and play--the neck strap isn't a good way to carry it about your day, it's really just there for convenience.

    Once you've decided on the size of the camera you are willing to carry, the next decision you need to make will be the size of the sensor. The sensor is the most critical component of taking a good picture--so long as you have the camera with you (see discussion above regarding size). The sensor size determines how much light is gathered by the camera, which affects the sharpness of the image, the dynamic range the camera can capture (the difference between the darkest point and brightest point in the picture), and the speed and accuracy of the auto focus. The Google Pixel, considered the best camera on a phone when it was released last year, has a 1/2.3" sensor. A "Full Frame" sensor, on the other hand, has about 35 times more surface area and light gathering capability than the small phone sensor.

    The problem is many of the basic compact "point-and-shoot" cameras recommended so far use the same 1/2.3" or even smaller 1/2.5" size sensor as many cell phones. Performance increases, if any, will be marginal. Why carry a second piece of kit when it's going to be limited by the same technology? Higher end "Shirt Pocket" cameras will have a 1/1.7" sensor, but that's pretty much the upper limit for Shirt Pocket cameras--each step up on the sensor size also increases the size of the lens needed to focus an image across the entire sensor, and at some point the camera just stops fitting in a shirt pocket.

    In comes the 1" type sensor. When the Sony RX100 was first released, they called it a "large sensor compact", and the 1" sensor offered unbelievable performance for a camera that still fit in a coat pocket. It provides about 5 times the surface area of a 1/2.3" sensor, and the corresponding performance was all the rage. Other manufacturers jumped onto the bandwagon to offer a large sensor compact such as Canon's G7X.

    But even at a cool 1", a sensor of that size is still pretty small compared to the sensors available on DSLR and mirror-less cameras. An APS-C sensor found on most DSLRs and some mirror-less cameras measures 23.5mm x 15.6mm, whereas a 1" sensor is 13.2mm x 8.8mm. That's 367mm² vs 116mm². A Full Frame sensor is a massive 864mm² by comparison.

    Once you've settled on a camera size and sensor size, find the camera with the largest aperture you can afford. Things like a viewfinder, additional focus points, touchscreens, faster processor, etc. can help you make your decision, but really, you'll want the largest aperture you can get. The aperture is the opening in the lens that lets light in, and the largest apertures on the biggest sensors carry the highest price tag. But, the return in the investment is that you get the maximum amount of light onto the sensor, which improves both image quality, focus speed and accuracy, as well as giving you the ability to get better pictures in low light and to capture images with selective focus (blurring the background and foreground to draw attention to your in-focus subject).

    Alright, long winded explanation aside now, my recommendation for cameras in a few of the categories discussed above:

    Shirt Pocket: Canon S120. It's really no contest. In a camera this size, it's one of the few that has the larger 1/1.7" sensor, a nice large aperture, decent zoom, and a control wheel on the front to let you manually adjust camera settings like aperture or shutter speed.

    Coat Pocket: If you have the money, the Sony RX100 V is the leader in 1" large sensor compacts. For a few hundred bucks less, you can get the Canon G7X.

    Coat Pocket Plus: The Fuji X100T is just sexy. It packs an APS-C sized sensor into a body with a fixed 35mm equivalent f2.0 lens (which is a fantastic focal length that makes very natural pictures with lots of background context). It's fast, it's got manual controls all over, and it's fun to shoot.

    Neck Strap: For an APS-C mirrorless camera, the Fuji XT-1 is a fantastic deal right now (because the new XT-2 was released this year). Paired with the 35mm f1.4 or the much cheaper 27mm pancake lens, you'll have a great walk around camera with flagship class performance and a platform you can grow on. You can also get an Olympus OM-D micro four thirds (MFT or M4/3) camera, but I'm not familiar enough with them to recommend one. The MFT format does make for a camera that is both lighter and smaller than anything offered in APS-C format.

    Camera Bag: I really wouldn't recommend a large DSLR camera for what you are intending. You can easily get all of the functionality of a non-professional level DSLR with a micro four thirds camera or a APS-C Mirrorless. If you wanted a professional level DSLR like a D810 or an 5D Mark IV, then you wouldn't really be reading this essay to the end. Heck, the top end Fuji, Olympus, and full frame Sony mirrorless cameras are almost becoming mainstream in professional circles.

    Hope this helps someone out there....
     
    #52 Aeteocles, Jun 24, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2017
    sarge1967 likes this.