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Loctite Blue Thread Lock stick

Discussion in 'Knives' started by Moshe ben David, Dec 22, 2017.

  1. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I've fortunately never used Loctite Red on a knife. However, I have used the Loctite Blue when repositioning clips.

    I like to carry tip down with the blade along the outer pocket seam on my right side. In other words, the clip ends up at the pivot end.

    No matter how careful I tried though -- even just applying a drop using the end of a toothpick or a bent paperclip, that blue stuff has caused me some grief. Worst case was when I move the clip on my Kershaw Cryo. That blue stuff seeped into the pivot, really messed it up. Might as well not be an assisted opening knife now -- really needs a good wrist flick.

    I recently posed the question of how to avoid this to Nick Shabazz. He brought my attention to the fact that Loctite Blue now is also available in a stick form; reviews on line suggest this is sort of the consistency of a chapstick. Seems this product has been out in the automotive world for some time -- I just didn't know of it.

    Anyone on here ever use this on a knife?

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  2. assassin10000

    assassin10000 Loaded Pockets

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    Sounds like even the drop was too much. I typically clean the inside surface after tightening if possible. Since you are on the pivot side you may not be able to reach to get that excess that's squeezed out when the threads are tightened.

    Instead of applying to the hole, I would apply to the screw and wipe the excess off so it's just level or below the thread height and let dry some before installing. This also prevents it from being pushed out the backside of the hole as you are threading the screw in, which is what happens if you apply to the hole itself.

    Another option is to disassemble the knife (if the clip doesn't cover any fasteners), install the clip, clean any excess locktite up, let dry/set and then reassemble after making sure nothing will make it to the pivot.


    This stick is nothing but a dryer application of the normal blue lock-tite, I'm not sure how easy it will be to apply to the small screws for a knife though. I've never tried.
     
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  3. Yablanowitz

    Yablanowitz Loaded Pockets

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    Never used it on a knife, but I have used it on other things. It seems to work just as well as the liquid and it is a lot neater to apply.
     
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  4. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    You've described what has happened very well. I've had it happen both when applying a drop to the hole or when applying to the threads. Problem with wiping excess off the screw threads is that clip screws are so doggone small that just handling them is a pain. I've never had a good way other than a driver with a magnetized head which is OK for getting them to the hole but not for much else.

    I've not attempted to disassemble any of these knives. I know that would be the best way; just haven't gotten to that point neither in terms of tools nor willpower!

    I also suspect applying the stick to the threads will not be all that simple; for the same reason as wiping excess off the threads. But I am hoping that at least it will reduce seepage into the pivot area!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  5. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    We live by the stuff in the First Robotics world (I am a fab/assembly mentor for a team). About the same consistence as chap stick. Way more student friendly than the liquid stuff. We teach the student to roll the fastener on the stick so the thread grooves get filled in with the stuff. Done right there is very little excess. Plus it does not migrate around like the liquid stuff. Do this for securing motors, and building transmissions. Use nylocks for most of the regular assembly.
     
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  6. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Have you used this stuff on any fasteners as small as clip screws? I don't doubt it would secure the threads; just wondering how tricky it is to handle fasteners like that to effectively use the stick type...

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  7. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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    Too cheap to buy yet another product for special cases.

    At the size of pocket clip screws I apply thread locker to the screw not the screw hole. The procedure generally goes something like this (apologies if anything seems like I am stating the obvious).

    1. Shake/knead the bottle/tube of Loctite. Over time, the transport liquid and thread locker separates. If they aren't fully mixed, you tend to have more migration and overspill.
    2. Squeeze a little thread locker on a small piece of aluminum foil.
    3. Pick up the screw by just the head using a jewelry pickup tool.
      [​IMG]
    4. Dip just the threads in the thread locker.
    5. If you then touch the screw to a clean portion of the foil, capillary action should shed any excess thread locker.
    6. Insert screw in hole, turn the pickup tool until the threads just begin to catch.
    7. Release the claws
    8. Do final tightening of the screw with the appropriate screw/bit driver.
    I have never had any Loctite wander off where it shouldn't have using this method.

    ATB,
    Sam
     
    Last edited by indigo_wolf, Dec 27, 2017
    #7 indigo_wolf, Dec 25, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017
    Gary Gross, Adahn and Mumbojumboo like this.
  8. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    Yes, use it on smaller that that. Tiny grub screws and collet screws. Technique we teach is to grap the fastener by the head with either tiny needle nose pliers or locking forceps (depending on the size of the fastener) and then gentle roll the threads in the blue loctite stick, wipe/scrape off the excess, if required, and then use the holding tool to get the fastener started. Depending on the level of skill/finesse you possess you can also use a magnetised driver if the fasteners are ferrous. This works well for lots of grub screws that have allen heads

    The liquid stuff works as well, and is actually easier to apply, as you can usually hold the fastener on a magnetised driver and apply a tiny drop, if (and it is a huge if) you use the correct amount. We switched to the stick format to deal with migration issues from the typical "more has got to be better" student application.
     
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  9. RoadWizard

    RoadWizard Loaded Pockets

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    Purple is recommended for any screws less than a quarter(.250) inch, used often with no issues, should be able to find at auto parts store. When attending school for motorcycle mechanic had to sit thru 4 hr class on Loctite, from one of their reps, actually pretty informative. Stay away from red, unless you want future nightmares with disassembly.
    http://na.henkel-adhesives.com/industrial/Loctite-Threadlockers-by-Color-14023.htm
     
  10. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    What you describe fits with what I thought I knew. However, one would think that screws holding a pocket clip on a knife would be small enough to use the purple, but so far I haven't heard anyone reply in the affirmative! I've been using blue; just wondered about the purple.

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
    I have been using blue when shifting my pocket clips. But as I described in my opening post, I've had issues with migration into the knife pivot. The worst case was on a Kershaw Cryo; completely messed up the assisted opening. The knife still opens; just needs a pretty significant wrist action. No, I didn't try to tear the knife down. I can still use it; so I just use the wrist...

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
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  11. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    I just as habit follow all the steps you describe. Shaking a bottle to make sure everything is mixed is built into my DNA. My Dad was a pharmacist; I was trained as a biochemist. No one in my family ever seems to handle even a bottle of salad dressing without shaking it. LOL.

    The one thing I don't have -- but as you may imagine I will buy -- is that jewelry pickup tool. Tell you the truth, I didn't know such tools exist! But really makes a ton of sense. Thanks for suggesting it!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  12. bj warkentin

    bj warkentin Loaded Pockets

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    Locking forceps are also great. They come in a variety of sizes and have more grip than the 3+ pronged pickups. I have both and find the forceps more useful for tiny fasteners. The only disadvantage is if you are gripping the fastener head off center they can slip and launch the teeny, tiny, impossible to find, one of a kind fastener, into the deepest darkest corner of the shop behind almost impossible to move equipment racks. For extra bonus points you can do this late at night, when you are hours away from a mission critical deadline.
     
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  13. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    UMM. No thanks. I've used locking forceps myself. I've also played the game of trying to find the object after launch... Don't ask me if I ever won! (Not!)

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  14. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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    Launching the object would be annoying. Wondering if I could reclaim it before the cat did would be nerve wracking. Pondering the chances of the screw making a detour through the cat's gastrointestinal tract is the stuff of nightmares. :eek::frantic:

    ATB,
    Sam
     
  15. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    Just look at it as a test of the quality of the stainless steel or whatever from which the screw was fabricated! You could also keep in mind the legendary very specific high gourmet coffee beans from Indonesia which are coffee beans which are 'processed' through the intestinal tract of a civet. No I am not making this up. Google it. I've never tried the stuff but it is reputed to make a 'marvelous' pot of coffee!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
  16. indigo_wolf

    indigo_wolf AKA Breezy

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    Yes, I ran into the reference of this a few years back when watching the movie, The Bucket List. Makes one wonder what prompt the first person to try this. "Hey, you know what would taste great?...."



    ATB,
    Sam
     
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