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Liquid Band Aids ???

Discussion in 'First Aid Station' started by TomWelch, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. TomWelch

    TomWelch Loaded Pockets

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    I couple of weeks ago I had a small cut on my toe that
    my neighbor put some liquid band aid on it. This worked
    very well.

    I had never heard of this product until she introduced me
    to liquid band aid, what are the general uses and limitations
    of this product?
     
  2. shmook

    shmook Loaded Pockets

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    It's goos for cuts/abrasions on 'non flat' areas of skin - between fingers etc, but I find it comes off a lot faster than it says on the tin, but I usually use a plaster as it protects the wound more from impact.
     
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  3. _jedi_

    _jedi_ Loaded Pockets

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    Liquid bandages are a great product for quickly addressing small lacerations or shallow punctures with light bleeding. The one thing that liquid bandages do not offer is any form of direct pressure or absorption. If there is too much blood, it will mix with the liquid bandage and prevent the polymer from setting properly.

    That said, I carry it in my EDC IFAK.
     
  4. CatherineM
    • In Omnia Paratus

    CatherineM Loaded Pockets

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    It was a necessity when I was the team mom for an AAU baseball team in Florida. Lots of owies and boo-boos. Between the heat and humidity, I'd have had to staple regular bandaids on. It also has some anesthetic built in. I always have some in my FAK.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  5. musicman13

    musicman13 Loaded Pockets

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    My mother works in a hospital, so we have boxes of hospital grade "dermabond" (brand name I believe) so I carry a stick around in my pack. I personally love it much more than a conventional band-aid due to the fact that it's far more convenient and in my opinion quicker to apply.
     
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  6. xbanker
    • Administrator

    xbanker Geriatric Admin
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    I've contemplated including in FAK, but haven't yet.

    Two questions:

    - conventional wisdom says don't close or seal a wound that hasn't been thoroughly cleaned/flushed; how does this square with usage of Dermabond-like products in the field where extensive cleaning just isn't possible?

    - read the following on CVS website regarding the brand they carry: Dermabond is a special glue that holds a wound together. Dermabond is used on the face, arms, legs, and torso. It can also be used on lacerations smaller than 2-½ inches. It is not used for lips, lacerations that are over joints, deep lacerations, or most hand and foot lacerations. The doctor will hold the wound shut. Next, he will apply a thin layer of Dermabond. Warmth may be felt as the glue sets. Dermabond will be applied in three coats. The wound will then be held in place for 60 seconds. The doctor may place a bandage over the wound. In some cases, stitches may also be done.

    Note: The glue acts like a protective coating. It is not placed in the wound or between the edges of the wound. Never try to repair a wound at home with glue. Getting glue into wounds may prevent them from healing properly.

    The statement I emphasized about placement ... how should it be applied ... only when edges of the wound can be held together while applying, resulting in the Dermabond only on the surface of the skin?

     
  7. Blitzwing
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Blitzwing Loaded Pockets

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    I have some of the nu skin in my kit.. I work in a health care setting and a open wound is just a vector for infection.. If I get a cut I flush it, disinfect it, then coat it with the liquid bandage (mind you on a fresh cut it stings like hell) which works fine even when I'm washing my hands at least a dozen times a day and holds up to hand sanitizer as well.
     
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  8. TomWelch

    TomWelch Loaded Pockets

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    Thank you, I've learned a lot here!
     
  9. Davidk

    Davidk Loaded Pockets

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    Im a electrician & constantly getting cut, liguid bandage, a reglar bandaid' and electrical tape work wonders dor small cuts on hands/fingers!
     
  10. RacerX

    RacerX Loaded Pockets

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    Fun fact: Dermabond is a cyanoacrylate, basically the same stuff as superglue. Superglue is 100% CA though, Dermabond has some dilutives/additives in the mix.

    In Vietnam medics used a CA spray to retard bleeding in the field. Field hospitals hated the stuff because if it wasn't used sparingly and in the right circumstances, it destroyed tissue surrounding the wound and made final sutures extremely difficult.

    /uselessknowledgemoment

    *edit* one more thing that I experienced personally, straight from Wikipedia:

    Reaction with cotton

    Applying cyanoacrylate to materials made of cotton or wool (such as cotton swabs, cotton balls, and certain yarns or fabrics) results in a powerful, rapid exothermic reaction. The heat released may cause serious burns,[17] ignite the cotton product, or release irritating white smoke. Material Safety Data Sheets for cyanoacrylate instruct users not to wear cotton or wool clothing, especially cotton gloves, when applying or handling cyanoacrylates.[18]

    Not sure if this applies to Dermabond as well, however...
     
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  11. ModrnDayMcGyver

    ModrnDayMcGyver Loaded Pockets

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    I love Dermabond, but in a pinch super glue works just fine.
     
  12. Cynt
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    Cynt Loaded Pockets

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    On liquid bandage type stuff.

    My son got to my wife's razor in the shower. He was about 18mos maybe younger at the time. He played with the edge and kinda freaked out at the blood and that it hurt. Would not put up with direct pressure on his finger tip, would not keep a bandaid on, liquid bandaid was about the only thing we could get on a fidly squirming mad toddler.

    Something to keep in mind. Its not high speed trauma gear, but with very young kids you might save a mom a lot of worry and stress. The bottles are very small too.
     
  13. Rapt_up

    Rapt_up Loaded Pockets

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    I use superglue routinely on my small nicks and cuts on my hands. Clean, dry, and hold shut while supergluing carefully. Then its closed and sealed way better than any bandaid. I really like the gel type best.

    I have also used it and liqud bandaid on my dogs when they get cuts/punctures. Much easier than trying to keep dressings on things that are open.
     
  14. Doobles

    Doobles Empty Pockets

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    Glue should only really be used on shallow wounds that are not grossly contaminated, easy to clean with good wound edge appostion. I've not had any experience of the Liquid Band Aid so I'm afraid I can't comment.
     
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  15. chmsam

    chmsam Loaded Pockets

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    New Skin spray and liquid have an antiseptic in it so it can sting for just a second or two. I use both (or a generic form) and find they work well. The only problem I've had with the liquid is that the inner seal on the cap sometimes gets separated. That doesn't make it leak but does make it harder to remove the cap -- not a biggie.

    Really good stuff for what's been mentioned before but also great for cuts around fingernails which can keep getting torn open.

    I've not used Band-Aid liquid bandage which is similar or Dermabond which is a skin adhesive.
     
  16. Butch007

    Butch007 Loaded Pockets

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    This is a good thread.

    I saw a product at the drug store called Nexcare Liquid Bandage Spray. Anyone use this stuff and would you recommend it for a EDC FAK?
     
  17. gremlin078

    gremlin078 Loaded Pockets

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    Is Nu Skin in the same family as dermabond? I knew about the antiseptic properties of Nu Skin liquid bandage, but didn't know that it was the same cyanoacrylic family i.e. superglue
     
  18. Rapt_up

    Rapt_up Loaded Pockets

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    New Skin appears to be benzethonium chloride with a cellulosic laquer base for forming a film (using n-butyl acetate as the solvent)... So it more a covering than a true bonding agent.
     
  19. Mudinyeri

    Mudinyeri Loaded Pockets

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    Another Super Glue user here. We also have the Nu-Skin product in the medicine cabinet at home. Clean the wound first - just as you would if you were going to suture - and then glue that puppy shut.

    I often split the tips of my fingers working out in the cold in the winter. Nothing works better than Super Glue to close and protect those splits.
     
  20. Fucifino
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    My EDC first aid kit consists of a bottle of liquid bandages, 5 butterfly band-aids, some regular band-aids, a few 3x3 pieces of gauze and some cloth tape. I figure if I cant fix something with that, it is about time to call in the pros.