1. Are you a current member with account or password issues?

    Please visit following page for more information

    Dismiss Notice

Let’s talk Tomahawks

Discussion in 'Knives' started by rlewpolar, Jan 9, 2022.

  1. rlewpolar

    rlewpolar Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2020
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    220
    Not sure this is the right place for this topic but who owns some? What kind? What do you use them for? All of a sudden I have a Tomahawk itch


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
    microbe, post tenebras and DCBman like this.
  2. A.B.

    A.B. Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    3,022
    Technically not hawks, but an Estwing hatchet and a Gransfors forest axe. I use them to chop firewood.

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G973F met Tapatalk
     
    post tenebras likes this.
  3. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    I think everyone needs a tomahawk, if for no other reason than...they're cool!

    A couple years back I bought a CRKT Chogan Woods tomahawk. It's actually a pretty functional tool, believe it or not. Historically, solo camping I've always carried either a camp axe, or a heavy hatchet, and I think the CRKT Chogan is a better option (after a couple modifications).

    The Chogan Woods tomahawk is the one with the hammer head on the other side, not the spike (the spiked ones are useless, IMHO...unless...you're a viking and want to really jack-up some rubber sword dorks at the local Renaissance Festival! LOL!). I digress.

    The hammer side is a milled face, so it works really well as a hammer, stake pounder and general purpose hammer (way better than an axe head back). The blade requires some serious attention when you first get it, but once you get it sharp it's a really good camp tool for chopping, splitting and utility work. The handle is really long, so the axe (tomahawk) head packs a wallop with some serious energy behind it. It's probably a little heavier than most of the gimmicky tomahawks, but I like the extra weight because it will do more. The blade is a little larger too, so you get some good purchase on wood when you're chopping.

    One thing (beyond the blade) which needs some work is the handle. Unlike most tomahawks, the head doesn't readily come off for detail work. For that, you have to remove some material from the handle just below the head (at least I did).

    Overall, I really like the thing! I wrapped mine with friction tape for a better grip, and to protect the handle.

    Nice tool!

    ETA - I've got mine razor sharp now with a good angle on the blade. It will chop, split, and if I remove the head I can dress a fish, rabbit or even a deer. In a pinch, I can even whittle with it, or use it as a knife.
     
  4. ramjet

    ramjet Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    865
    I have a SOG in the truck. Great tool for Justin’. Also, easy to pack out if i bail from the vehicle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    microbe likes this.
  5. A.B.

    A.B. Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    3,022
    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G973F met Tapatalk
     
    Last edited by scríbhneoir, Apr 11, 2022
    #5 A.B., Jan 10, 2022
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2022
    karlito likes this.
  6. Rebel

    Rebel Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2015
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    67
    They have been averaging one human death per month from dog attacks in this country- that's just what makes it to the news.

    Dog attacks are considered monetary damage here, not criminal, and people let dangerous dogs loose in public. This is a serious problem and although after years public opinion is starting to say this has to end, there isn't any end in sight. Police have no legal jurisdiction according to Czech law. If the dog has attacked somebody and the police happen to be there, they can kill it. But if the dog kills or maims somebody and is not caught in the act, the case goes to the veterinary agency which does an evaluation on the dog. In most of these cases, the dog is released and repeats attacks. Many of the deaths are caused by recidivist dogs.

    About 1% of the population is able to get a gun license here, but edged weapons are something that almost every carries since there is no restriction. Public sentiment is that we're tired of being sitting ducks, open season on humans.

    So what the hell's wrong with you...
     
    post tenebras likes this.
  7. rlewpolar

    rlewpolar Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2020
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    220
    What’s wrong with a good pepper spray? I’ve stopped a pack of attacking dogs with a good fogger (Fox 5.3). Don’t know what the legality of pepper spray is in Czechoslovakia but it seems way less medieval than using a Tomahawk on a dog. Ironically, we have no problem talking about using one of these on a human attacker so maybe we here in the US are being hypocritical. I’ve noticed that other countries don’t revere pets like we do here in the US. So there may be a cultural issue here at play. Me, I’m a through and through dog lover and shuddered at your post


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
    karlito likes this.
  8. post tenebras

    post tenebras Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2012
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    221
    I’ve been eying the Estwing Tomahawk for years but Reason keeps winning out, preventing me from buying it.
     
  9. Boy SureFire

    Boy SureFire May The Bridges I Burn Light The Way

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Messages:
    2,669
    Likes Received:
    153
    United Cutlery M48 Hawk. I use it around camp for kindling/fire tending, and I also enjoy tomahawk throwing. My larger wood/fire tasks are handled by a pulaski axe in addition to a hand saw. Both axes live in my vehicle for camping/emergency purposes since I'm in a more rural area.
     
  10. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    I kind of get where @Rebel is coming from here. One pitbull can be a problem. Two pitbulls running together is usually a problem. A pack of feral, wild, pitbulls running together is definitely a problem! Dogs left to run freely will breed, and after a couple generations those offspring become feral.

    I love dogs with every cell in my body. I've raised and professionally trained dogs for hunting (Labradors). I have two dogs that I love dearly now. However, I am also a cattleman, and would have no problem shooting dogs who get into our cattle (pitbulls, or any other breed). Out here in the country, dogs are considered "predators" and it is completely legal to shoot one if they are on your property and not under control. Coyotes are no different. Fortunately, we don't have restrictions on firearms (yet...although they're trying hard). We also don't have a pitbull or dog-pack problem...which brings up another point...

    I'll bet the pitbull problem in the Czech Republic doesn't exist because people love pitbulls as "pets", but rather that, if they are raised properly, they can serve as a powerful protector of people and/or property. And, in the absence of firearms, people probably need some help fending off thieves and other criminals. But when those dogs get loose, then they create a problem.

    Now, perhaps Rebel's post could have been worded a little differently to make it have a little softer impact, but personally I hate candy-coating a subject. Plus, what would you do if you had a pitbull coming after you, or one of your loved ones? Would you have a problem shooting it? What if you couldn't have a firearm to defend yourself, or your loved ones? A tomahawk seems like a perfectly viable alternative.

    I don't know, just my take on the matter.
     
    post tenebras likes this.
  11. A.B.

    A.B. Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    3,022
    I have owned dogs all my life. And I'm talking American bulldogs and Argentino's here. Never, ever has any dog, my own, somebody else's or a stray, try to bite me. I get that whole protecting yourself thing, but in my experience, dogs are way better than humans. Domesticated or not. If it is really that bad in the Czech Republic, I would rather walk around with some sausages to feed them and make an instant friend then bash their head in. But that is just me. I like animals. Humans, not so much...

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G973F met Tapatalk
     
    DCBman likes this.
  12. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Well, not to argue, because I respect differing opinions, but I suspect if a stray dog latched onto your kid's arm you might have a different opinion. Now, I can't speak for the Netherlands, but here in the US, I've personally had situations where a pocket full of sausages wouldn't have made any difference...and I got bitten (twice actually). Fortunately, it wasn't a pitbull, but rather a German Shepard type dog (the first time). I didn't even see it coming! I saw the dog in front of me, but then it disappeared behind a building. It was dark, and the next thing I knew it had grabbed a full bite of my upper thigh just below my butt from behind. Bit right through my jeans. Got about 6 stitches from that. The second time it was a Pitbull, and it was on our property, and it was going after our cattle until I distracted it by hollering at it. It charged head-on and leaped for my face. I quickly backed up and it landed in front of me and kept coming. Grabbed my shin just below my knee and just about pulled me down! That time I was armed, and that dog is no longer around.

    Oh, and I completely agree...I like my dogs better than I like most humans (except for maybe my wife).
     
    #12 DCBman, Jan 11, 2022
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2022
    jag-engr and A.B. like this.
  13. A.B.

    A.B. Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    3,022
    Then we live in very different places, I guess. Maybe our wild dogs aren't as wild as over there. Even the wolves here only attack sheep and deer and shy away from humans. Maybe I'm being naïve, maybe dogs like me just as much as I like them. I don't know.

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G973F met Tapatalk
     
    DCBman likes this.
  14. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Well, I think you may be correct. The Netherlands is a much more responsible society than here in the US. We have a whole lot of really irresponsible people who don't care about any thing, or any one. So, I would agree, it is indeed a 'very different' place. I've done a lot of work Internationally, and have had the pleasure of working with a number of engineers from the Netherlands, so while I'm not an expert on your culture, I am familiar with the people and customs.

    I would imagine that same responsible culture extends to dog ownership as well. So, you probably don't have a whole lot of people who just abandon their animals to the wild when the "cute puppy" thing wears off.
     
    A.B. likes this.
  15. A.B.

    A.B. Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    3,022
    I don't know much about US culture other then I see on tv. I always thought the "west" is the "west". I guess I'm wrong there, then. But to be fair, we have a whole lot of idiots here as well. Maybe because we are a very tiny country it doesn't show as much... LOL

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G973F met Tapatalk
     
  16. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Heh, how ironic the subject is 'tomahawks'!

    No, you have it correct; the "west" here is indeed the west...the "Wild Wild West"!!

    We like our tomahawks! LOL!

    :frantic:
     
    A.B. likes this.
  17. Sentinel-14

    Sentinel-14 Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    246
    I've thrown tomahawks before, but never owned or used one as a tool. My general opinion from the ones I threw was that tomahawks aren't for me.

    As an amateur outdoors guy, I started out with a big knife/small knife pair: a BK9 and BK16. Eventually found need for a hatchet and came across the idea of using a carpenter's half hatchet on a longer handle, or a riggers axe, as a sort of "poor man's Gransfors Small Forest Axe." Picked up a head for cheap, hafted it on a 20" House riggers handle, and ended up with a nice all-purpose camping/bushcrafty tool that has all but replaced my BK9. It's a 22oz head on a 19" handle, with 3 inches of bit on one side and a hardened hammer poll on the other. Good for chopping and splitting small wood (less than 3" in diameter), and the poll is great for driving stakes without worrying about deforming the eye. Not particularly balanced for throwing though: only an hour after I finished hafting it one of my uncles had the idea to show off to my nephews by throwing it at a tree: instead of sticking it bounced off the tree and lacerated his (uncle's) arm.

    So, I don't have any hawks nor do I have any want for any, but my half-hatchet works just fine as a camp tool and that's exactly what I want it for. If I were to get a hawk for whatever reason I'd probably get the above-mentioned Woods Chogan, as it seems most suited to do the tasks my half-hatchet does. Not a fan of the cast head, but it'd probably work fine all the same.
     
  18. DCBman

    DCBman Loaded Pockets

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2014
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    1,929
    Funny that you would mention a "riggers axe", or rigging axe as I've known them. These are fantastic tools! In fact, when I worked as a carpenter, a 28oz. Vaughn Rigger / Rigging Axe was my primary framing hammer. It was the 2nd heaviest framing hammer on the market, second only to the Vaughn 32oz. framing hammer. The 32 was a claw hammer, the rigging axe does have a nail puller, but it's better to use a bar over your hammer (because you have to turn the handle sideways to use it). I wanted a hammer which would drive a 16d framing nail in two swings, and that would do it. In fact, it was that hammer which was the inspiration for choosing the CRKT Woods Chogan for a tomahawk. Would it ever replace it? Never, but it's cool.

    Most of the tomahawks are far too small to do any real work, and that's one of the things I fault them over. The Woods Chogan is considerably larger than most. And, the hammer head is definitely useful (unlike things like hooks / spikes, etc.).

    I guess my bottom line is I figured I couldn't go to my grave without owning a tomahawk, and the one I picked is actually pretty useful and I like it. But, it's a camp tool, not a construction tool.
     
    Sentinel-14 likes this.
  19. scríbhneoir
    • Administrator

    scríbhneoir Uber Prepared
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    10,018
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Some posts edited to remove offensive comment.
     
  20. microbe

    microbe EDC Junkie!!!!!

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    1,633
    Likes Received:
    33,812