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Laptop Reliability

Discussion in 'Electronic Devices' started by snowkiwi, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. Jean

    Jean Loaded Pockets

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    I'm sure you can find a home for that MacBook.
     
  2. chaosmagnet
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    chaosmagnet Loaded Pockets

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    Four years ago my then-corporate overlords decreed that my laptop was to be a Lenovo ThinkPad widescreen desktop replacement. It was heavy as :stomp::devil::banghead:and I probably had 100K air miles with the blasted thing. The battery was good for about an hour. But it ran good and never broke. More recently I bought a Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 11e for personal use and while it's low-spec it has been rock solid. My daughter liked it so much she saved her money and bought herself one.
     
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  3. T Shrapnel-Carruthers

    T Shrapnel-Carruthers Loaded Pockets

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    My mid-2010 13" MBP is still good to go. If only it wasn't twice the weight of the MBA that replaced it.
     
  4. DeepBlue

    DeepBlue Loaded Pockets

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    Just looking through these posts and what strikes me is that a) we (including myself) can expect 5-6 years use out of a Laptop before its obsolescent and b) decent machines are pretty robust and don't typically just die.

    On obsolescence, just 8 years or so back I thought I'd done pretty well to get 3 years from a machine. Typically, a laptop was feeling slow and sluggish and unable to cope with the latest o/s or apps by that time and I'd be very happy to be getting a new one at work (I've been using laptops since the earliest machines - 17lb Toshibas and Dells began appearing around early 90's) after 3 years. So in that time I've gone from 17lb machines that were obsolete inside 18 months or so to a sub 2lb machine (Macbook 12") which looks good for at least another 3 years.

    On robustness, I've rarely had an issue. Recent times, the corporate machine was IBM/Lenovo Thinkpads. All were decently robust and well made. I think the only issue I had was that one model tended to break the screen ribbon cable after 12-18 months use but that seemed to be a design flaw on that model. Got better when SSD became the norm. My last Lenovo was a light small one with SSD and I managed to fling that from a rucksack 3 times in a month from about 4-5' onto some very hard surfaces (user error with a bit of a dodgy bag). No damage apart from a scuff to the corner. I was pretty impressed with that but I suspect the much lighter smaller machines are now much less susceptible to damage anyway. I now use Apple MacBooks and personally find them very good and well made. I don't baby any of my machines but I'm not careless (one rucksack aside) with them either, they dont live in padded bags just a thin sleeve that protects against scratches when slipped into a shoulder bag.

    In 25 years, I've travelled all over the world with laptops using them every day including, in recent years, to places that are dirty and dusty and very off-grid. My experience is that, for the better 'business class' and therefore expensive gear, they are not and probably never were, unreliable and 'disposable' electronics. May be different at the $300-$400 end. I think this is a case of 'you gets what you pay for'.
     
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  5. Moshe ben David

    Moshe ben David Loaded Pockets

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    DeepBlue: I can relate!

    Back in the days when I was really a 'road warrior', I only experienced one true hardware failure. And it wasn't the laptop itself. No, the problem was the recharger 'brick'. And back then they were really bricks. On the side where the power cord from the wall socket entered the brick, something went wrong. Basically in those days, the power cord was designed to be removable from the plug using a female three blade plug on the cord. Seems the idea was to make it more compact for travel. At any rate, this ultimately caused the pins inside the brick to loosen up, making the brick useless, resulting in an inability to recharge the laptop... Due to travel I went 24 hours without a charger until I could replace it.

    When I finally moved over to a MacBook Pro, the Apple approach to the charger was sheer joy!

    L'chaim!

    Moshe ben David
     
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  6. T Shrapnel-Carruthers

    T Shrapnel-Carruthers Loaded Pockets

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    I have had a couple of hardware failures: a couple of hard drives, a motherboard and something on a Thinkpad that went "phut". The latter is the only one that occurred on the road, shortly after take-off on a flight from Chicago to Singapore, producing a rather nasty smell and destroying my plan to clear an email backlog.
     
  7. mrsleeve

    mrsleeve Loaded Pockets

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    I might be a bit late to the party, but for the last decade or so I have been running what ever the big box store had a sale on for about 300 bucks, and doing the same for my wife. Now I travel for a living and my laptop general goes in and out of a hotel room every day, and my wife watches or flows much of her video entertainment though her laptop. We had been getting about 3-4 years out of a set, and replacing them. So I finally got off a little money and got her a mid level 17" Asus G751 gaming rig, mostly for the cooling and the GTX 980m graphics card. Best decision hands down for her as she does not travel as much, and her set up never runs hot, and needs a cool down period to buffer and it has become a desktop replacement for her for just everything she does.

    So when my last big box special started to go out (Win 10 free upgrade really took its toll) I just picked up a MSI similar in spec to my wifes ROG just in a slightly smaller case with a bit less robust cooling system, again one of the bet buys I have done for my self in a long time. I went with the smaller case for travel reasons, yes its heavy but it boots from cold in less than 30sec, it runs all my games on the highest settings, it will run all the proprietary company software with ease should my issued POS ever go down, it does not hesitate at all with any photo processing and will run most all it at the same time. Yes they were expensive, but they are both upgradeable,and serviceable so when they start to fall behind the times in performance a few simple upgrades and we back to current spec. Same if they break they are worth fixing.

    BEST OF ALL going with these more Niche setups with the all metal cases and and lots of go fast parts, NO FRICKEN BLOAT WARE well there was a little bit from Asus, but not the obnoxious amounts of "preinstalled" USELESS :censored: that you get on the stuff outta the big box stores computer departments
     
  8. WillAdams

    WillAdams Loaded Pockets

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    To avoid bloatware, get a "Microsoft Signature Edition" version from the Windows store.