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Knife Restoration, have you done any?

Discussion in 'Knives' started by TRUE LIBERTY, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. TRUE LIBERTY

    TRUE LIBERTY Loaded Pockets

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    Around my neighborhood they have heard I do sharpening and thought that means I could do knife repairs. So they showed me this German knife made in 60s they bought in Germany. It had 2 inches of the tip broken off and they had put in storage for a decade. I had only done one other broken tip when my wife dropped a large kitchen knife and broke of a inch from the tip. Anyways I could kick myself for not taking a before photo but quite happy on how it turned out.
    [​IMG]
    It had some rust and pretty heavy scratches but I couldn’t remove all the scratches because I had to preserve the artwork on the blade. And it sharpened razor sharp with a really nice reflection.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. twin63

    twin63 Loaded Pockets

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    That looks great! Excellent work.
     
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  3. Adahn

    Adahn Loaded Pockets

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    Good job! Do you have 'before' pictures?

    Here's my biggest restoration project I've made 6 years ago:

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  4. TRUE LIBERTY

    TRUE LIBERTY Loaded Pockets

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    No, I thought after I started I should have done a photo.
    Love the handle you did on that one. How did you attach it, I don’t see the pins like on the original handle?
     
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  5. Adahn

    Adahn Loaded Pockets

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    Thank you.
    First I glued (epoxy) the antler onto a piece of carbon fiber as a spacer, then the teak (the antler was not long enough but had the perfect shape to act as a guard)
    Then I drilled a hole into the antler, down into the teak to hold the tang. Then I added a carbon fiber bolster onto the blade (which should have been thicker) with the exact size of the tang (I had to heat it up a bit to push it onto the tang).
    The tang has two holes, one is held by a screw that's goes through the teak, you see it as a pin. The other hole in the tang holds a screw with some nuts and acts as a hidden pin with epoxy all around it.

    So I had the blade with the bolster (sealed with superglue in the inside) and the handle, filled up the hole in the handle, pushed in the tang, pushed throught the screw, held the bolster on both sides with clamps and let it set for some hours.

    I intended to epoxy the tang into the handle, hold it in space with that screw, remove the screw, add a brass pin.
    The epoxy held so strong on the thread that I couldn't remove it, so I just sanded it over ;)
     
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