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Klean Kanteen thermal bottles - any temperature tests out there?

Discussion in 'Other Every Day Carry Items' started by Chiro75, Oct 23, 2014.

  1. Chiro75

    Chiro75 Loaded Pockets

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    Have avoided these bottles for a long time, no idea why because I just got my first one and it is AMAZING! I'm writing a review for my KCcoffeegeek site and before I reinvent the wheel, does anyone know if anyone has posted temperature data for these before? I.e. temperature changes over a period of time. It's my understanding that ice will stay ice for like a day+ and I did a quick test last night where I saw a 20 degree shift in water from 202 to 182 over an hour of time (in a non-pre-heated bottle). Drank two cups of coffee this AM and it stayed nuclear hot with the cafe cap both times for far longer than I needed it to, which was great!

    In any case, if anyone knows of a review where data like that has been posted can you PM me the link or point me in the right direction? THANKS!!!
     
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  2. Fire50

    Fire50 Loaded Pockets

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    Ill bump this thread. Id also like to see these results
     
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  3. Chiro75

    Chiro75 Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting that this isn't out there. Anyway, I'll share my experience of the 12oz thermal with Cafe Cap. If you prep the bottle (pour boiling water in and let it sit for a minute or two) and then pour coffee in, it will stay nuclear hot for well over an hour and probably closer to 2, and then will stay very warm for a long time after.

    In fact, it stays so hot for so long I think it's to the detriment of your coffee. I.e. good coffee is going to tend to open up and change as it cools and really good coffee will probably taste better the closer it gets to room temp, even. So, for me, I actually need and want the cooling. It does work as a nice sort of decanter so I can pour a little in my cup and refresh it, but I only make enough for a cup at a time, anyway.

    But yeah, this thing will stay VERY hot for a very long time!
     
  4. Blitzwing
    • In Omnia Paratus

    Blitzwing Loaded Pockets

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    Mines done well.. The weak link is the cafe cap.. If you use the standard it at least doubles the time involved.. I've gone 3 hours and nearly burned my tongue and after a full day of work in my truck it was still warm.
     
  5. comeonbabylightmyfire

    comeonbabylightmyfire Loaded Pockets

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    This thread is cheering me up tremendously. I have a 12oz Klean Kanteen on my Xmas list.

    Well, I've already bought it but it has to go anonymously to a family member for them to wrap. I must remember to look surprised and delighted when I open it.
     
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  6. Jaybrowndetroit

    Jaybrowndetroit Empty Pockets

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    I have several KK's insulated. They are SUPERB! You need to preheat, per standard procedure. In summer, the cold retention was umbelievable, even after 2 days in a stifling hot parked car. The Canteen cap doesn't temperature seal as well, due to design, so if you don't need that sipping convenience, I prefer the standard gasket sealed caps.

    This guys did some testing of many brands:



    (sorry, site won't allow my citation. Try thewirecutter dot com/reviews/best-water-bottle/
    You can research other multi-bottle tests easily; some post degree gains in 12 hours and 24 hour benchmarks.
     
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  7. Justinicus

    Justinicus Loaded Pockets

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    Edit: I screwed up. Everywhere I say Klean Kanteen below, I mean Hydro Flask. Oops.

    I use a 40oz vacuum-insulated KK as my daily water bottle. In high heat (above 85F or so), with cold water and about 25-33% ice, I expect it to be ice-cold for at least 12 hours, and pleasantly cold under about 50F) for 18-24 hours. The lower the volume, the shorter it can maintain its temp -- simple physics, there. So if I have 40oz of ice water, and chug a quart, that last cup isn't going to stay cold nearly as long.
    In cool conditions like right now (Autumn in full swing, and my mountain cottage is kept in the low-to-mid 60s), I can expect 40oz of ice water to still have a significant amount of ice floating in it after 24 hours.
    I haven't done any hot fluid tests, but I suspect my wife (bless her heart) doesn't really get how these work. She'll fill up water bottles for me and store them in the fridge... filtered tap water at about 75F went into the fridge (32-34F) this summer, and after about 36-48 hours, it still felt luke-warm on my tongue.

    I'm not familiar with Klean Kanteen's smaller offerings, but the 40oz bottle is pretty sturdy. I have two, and have dropped them both MANY times onto blacktop and gravel, falls of about 2-4ft. The powder-coat will take a beating and not flake away, and the sizable dents have not significantly affected its insulating properties. Let's say they look like they have a bit of character ;).

    If you want the best thermal performance, though, in a smaller package (i.e. for coffee), I have it on good authority that Zojirushi is unbeatable. I just this week purchased their latest 16oz bottle ("Zojirushi SM-SA48-BA Stainless Steel Mug, Black, 16-Ounce" on Amazon), and it's performance is impressive. I preheated, poured in hot coffee, doctored it to my liking (including cold creamer) which probably brought it down to about 170-180F. I intended to sip it during my 90-minute commute, and have some left at the office. I couldn't do more than noisily slurp an ounce or so for that entire commute; it was undrinkably hot for at least the first two hours. I wasn't able to drink it comfortably (140-150F) until I came back to it at lunch, about five or six hours later. The downside is that it was surprisingly light. Tapping on the side makes it sound like the metal is pretty thin. I don't think it will be anywhere near as rugged as my big KK bottles when it comes to drops and bangs. My KKs are beaters -- Zojirushi is a trailer queen.

    For comparison, I've been using a "Thermos Stainless Steel King 16-Ounce Travel Tumbler, Midnight Blue" (so titled on Amazon) for a few years now. A couple of them, actually. They're very serviceable, significantly cheaper than Zojirushi, they disassemble for cleaning like the Zojirushi (hallelujah), but they cool down a LOT faster. I haven't done a side-by-side test, but the Thermos cup always went from rocket-hot to barely drinkable in about 45 minutes, and to pleasantly hot in about 3hrs. By 6 or 7 hours, it was down to barely warm. Its sweet spot was about 2-5hrs, where the Zojirushi's seems to be about 4-7hrs.

    Back to the original point of this topic -- if you DO perform thermal tests, I would definitely recommend comparing KK to Zojirushi!
     
    Last edited by Justinicus, Nov 7, 2014
  8. Justinicus

    Justinicus Loaded Pockets

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    Oh, point of fact for anyone who hasn't thought much about it -- you'll always get different performance on cold and hot things.

    It comes down to the all-important delta-T. The larger the temperature difference, the faster thermal energy flows. Stick a 200F cup of coffee and a 120F cup of coffee in a 72F room, and the temp of the hotter liquid will drop faster than the cooler liquid. The further your temp is from ambient, the faster it changes. Now, the cooler cup will still reach ambient sooner, but it will happen less dramatically.
    A hot drink is usually put into a thermo cup at somewhere around 180F. Assuming room temperature (72F), that's over 100 degrees delta T. A cold drink is usually at 32F -- only 40 degrees delta T. Energy will flow out of the hot drink into the environment a lot faster than from the environment into the cold drink. Better performance on the cold side.

    An open top makes a difference too. Hot drink example: hot coffee at the top of a thermos cup touches room temperature air. Some of the heat is lost to the air, and that top coffee cools a bit. Convection brings that cooler coffee down towards the bottom, giving more hot coffee access to the cool air at the top. Likewise, the air does the same thing... warm coffee-scented air rises away, fresh cool air comes into contact with fresh hot coffee. It's a small, but significant drain on the heat. Cold example: ice floats to the top, cooling the local air and the warmer water at the top of the bottle. Convection in the water keeps the entire vessel circulating, just like the hot stuff, but the opposite happens with the air -- ice and cold water cools the air at the top of the open vessel, and keeps it anchored right where it is. Better performance on the cold side.

    An even bigger factor is the ice itself; cold drinks usually have ice in them. It takes a lot of energy to melt ice... just like condensing steam dumps a lot of energy (that's why steam burns skin so badly). Melting a 32 degree ice cube into 32 degree water takes a lot of energy, even though the temperature didn't change a bit. So cold drinks with ice can stay at 32F until all the ice is melted, while the hot drink has been steadily cooling all the while. WAY better performance on the cold side.

    This long-winded explanation is why the stats on a given container will say something like "keeps drinks hot for 8 hours, cold for 18 hours" or something similar. It's also how I'm procrastinating!
     
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