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Is your watch a necessary gear item?

Discussion in 'Watches' started by DayPackDeacon, Oct 31, 2015.

  1. dplafoll

    dplafoll Loaded Pockets

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    And every time you do that, it costs some measure of battery life. EDCing a watch is like EDCing a flashlight. Yes, your phone can do both, but the separate tools do it better, save your phone battery charge, and look and feel better at it to boot.
     
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  2. nr73

    nr73 Loaded Pockets

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    Instructions that came with my Breitling:

    In the Northern hemisphere

    Point the hour hand precisely towards the sun. In relation to the watch dial, the point located midway between the current time and 12 o’clock indicates the South, the North being exactly opposite.

    In the Southern hemisphere

    Point the hour-marker located at 12 o’clock on the dial precisely towards the sun. In relation to the watch dial, the point located midway between the current time and 12 o’clock indicates the North, the South being exactly opposite.




     
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  3. baconboyrlz
    • In Omnia Paratus

    baconboyrlz Loaded Pockets

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    Oh my gosh. One time I lost my watch for about a week, and it was driving me insane, looking at my wrist all the time and then realizing I don't have my watch. Luckily I did find it, and with it, my sanity. :D
     
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  4. dmattaponi

    dmattaponi Loaded Pockets

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    A cellphone is a poor excuse for a wristwatch IMO. Much more convenient to glance at a watch, than to have a phone constantly in hand.
     
  5. RogerStenning

    RogerStenning EDC Junkie

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    Yes. The one I use at the moment is a quartz one, but the battery still outlasts the one on the phone my many orders of magnitude ;) The current aim is to get an automatic mechanical one to eventually replace it. I Used to have a Tissot Seastar (heirloom from my late Grandfather), but it's no longer working, sadly. So, I'll get a new G10 from CWC at some point, instead :)
     
  6. moostapha

    moostapha Loaded Pockets

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    Same here. When I switched to a NATO/Zulu strap, I realized it felt enough different that I could wear it on either wrist...but it only felt right facing inward. I literally never wear a bracelet watch like this, always a strap watch.

    I thought I'd try it the correct way...inside the weak wrist...then smashed my omega into the hand guard of my ar-15 five minutes later.

    The watch is worth more than the rifle, so...never again. Inside strong or occasionally outside weak, though when I wear it there, I check the other 3 places first.

    Deapite knowing thisnyears ago, I "learned" from a YouTube video a few months ago and could not for the life of me figure out why it was exactly backwards.

    Stupid Aussie. You're supposed to have a STRONG accent so I don't get confused you tosser.

    (Note: the insult is not directed at any individual, not even the guy in the video)
     
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  7. AK Adventurer

    AK Adventurer Ice, Ice, Tigre

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    For me it is. The ocassions are anywhere there is no wall clock, vehicle clock, or any other devices use would be dangerous to me or the device. Pretty much all of any day...

    I'm a bit OCD about knowing what time it is, regaurdless of having a schedule, and then there are the times I need to be on time for a schedule. As has been said, getting the phone out is slow, and depending on where you are, and what your doing, dangerous. For you, or the phone.

    I can look at my watch with both hands full, or while driving(no clocks in my trucks, they pre date that). Things I do at work can destroy a phone, and work tends to be away from a wall clock, or even a building to hold one. Or work can coat the phone in any number of chemicals... the watch on the other hand(uhhm.. no pun intended) is above my grip area and usually stays clean, and I don't have to touch/grip it to use it. In the winter getting a phone out requires removal of a glove, and opening several layers, a pocket etc.. Watch requires simply pulling back a glove cuff in most cases.

    A watch is also great for times I'm in pitch black(granted the lume on it is decent), and need it to stay that way, either to not bother others(theatres, tents, bedrooms, dark car while someone else is driving), or hide yourself.(nothing tactical here, for me thats for pre dawn hunting). Turn my phone on for the time and the light output can be seen from Mars. ;)

    I can also have the time at Any time, anywhere, endlessly... Power outages, and dead batteries don't apply since my watches are almost all either Solar or Mechanical.

    A wrist watch is simple Instant access to the time.
    Pocket watches are a bit more of a grey area since they are slower to get at, but still have the plusses of always being with me, and over a phone, they are small, light weight, and a Lot less expensive to risk to certain situations, just like their wrist worn counterparts.
     
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  8. AK Adventurer

    AK Adventurer Ice, Ice, Tigre

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    Like you and TheGremlin I'm a lefty(mostly-->am sorta ambidextrous) and wear it on my left wrist. :cool:

    Might have started like has been mentioned, that its a right handed world, and I went with what seemed natural... Can't remember that far back. If I had a choice, (I don't... a watch on my right feels too dang odd, and makes that wrist ache) I'd still choose the left side.

    IMO, If you think about it, you naturally protect your strong hand more, since its used more. So the watch is safer on that side.

    Which always strikes me as odd, when the reason its soposed to be worn on your off hand side, has always been explained to me that the watch is safer on that side, away from the hand you work with.

    The flip side being that the watch being on your dominate side is more dangerous to you/your hand, since its more likely to get caught in any mechanical work... But common sense dictates taking a watch off of Any hand if its likely to get caught in things.. ;) And I still say I'd most likely protect that dominate hand before the other one.

    I also wear most watches facing in, watch face on the palm side of my hand/wrist. In most work its more protected there from my surroundings and work, tools etc. And all I have to do to see it is raise my hand in most cases and its already facing me. Worn on the outer side, I always seem to have to twist/rotate my hand/arm 180 degrees to see it.
     
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  9. FeeSimpleAbsolute

    FeeSimpleAbsolute Loaded Pockets

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    Interesting. I never really thought about it; just wore the watch. But your reasoning makes sense to me.

    And I do take watches off before doing something that could injure it. I don't have terribly expensive watches, but I can't really replace them right now, and I don't want to mess them up if I can avoid it. It helps that I don't do much mechanical work these days.
     
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  10. Swe_Nurse

    Swe_Nurse Loaded Pockets

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    Regarding left or right wrist carry:

    I wear my watch on my left, wearing it on my right feels odd. My father and my brother wear theirs on the right wrist and it feels odd for them to wear it on the left wrist. We are all right handed.

    The "traditional way" is probably the off-hand carry (which historically means left wrist) and I can see a few reasons for it. First you are usually doing something with your dominant hand, the watch can get damaged, get stuck, damage other things and so on. Especially since the first watches were fairly fragile, not exactly G-shocks. Secondly if your dominant hand is occupied it is harder to glance at the watch. For example when holding a rifle right-handed it would be a bit awkward to check the watch. Now nothing of this is much a problem if you are used to it of course.
     
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  11. Corgi

    Corgi EDC Junkie

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    Right now my watch needs a new battery, so I've been reduced to looking at clocks on the wall...
     
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  12. bryanflowers

    bryanflowers Loaded Pockets

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    I don't trust any man that doesn't wear a watch and a belt.
     
  13. Rich73

    Rich73 Loaded Pockets

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    Like AKAdventurer said above; you can count on a watch. I use my phone as a phone, and that's it. It's a smartphone (Samsung Galaxy) and very competent, but I no longer use the flashlight app or any of the other battery-consuming ones either. None of my mechanical watches have ever let me down. Come to think of it neither have my quartz ones... Compare with my daughter dropping my first smartphone, batteries wearing down over time, the charger cable no longer working, the time it got wet while I was cycling, etc etc...
     
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  14. bob_the_bomb

    bob_the_bomb Loaded Pockets

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    Yes. Batteries on phones are not reliable. A bezel provides a basic timer function and you can find north with it. I consider it an EDC and an outdoors/survival item. Oh and you can braid a paracord strap too...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  15. dplafoll

    dplafoll Loaded Pockets

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    Yep. Seiko 5 is here and I was right about missing having a watch. I love it, it looks amazing, and I'm so happy to have a watch again.
    The only problems are that the strap is a little itchy so I'll end up with some NATO/Zulus, and also now I've acquired a new way to spend money on gear. Luckily this thing oughta scratch the new itch for a while, at least long enough to buy some other stuff.
     
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  16. Outbound

    Outbound Loaded Pockets

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    I don't wear a watch at work. It'd get destroyed before lunch on the first day, even my G-shock. Days off, puttering around the house I don't care what time it is or where my phone is. However, when I leave the house first thing I do getting ready is strap on my watch and slip a knife into my pocket. So yes and no, it's a critical edc item for me.
     
  17. thatotherguy

    thatotherguy EDC Junkie!!!!!

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    As a previous poster has also said, I know several people (actually all women, to be honest) that wear dead or otherwise nonfunctional watches as fashion statements... some of them have watches that run, but they've never set the time on them and don't care to.

    I don't understand that mentality. A working watch is just as much of a fashion statement as the same watch with a dead battery, but if it's working one doesn't have to ask someone else for the time. I suppose I just don't understand, but the idea of wearing something functional that has been robbed of its functionality and still using it as a statement without also having the functionality (which detracts from the statement aspect not even a little bit) boggles me.

    I feel the same way about faux dive bezels and fake chronograph subdials. There's a functional reason for them, so why don't they function? At least with chronographs one can have the legitimate argument that adding a chrono complication to a three hand movement also adds cost, same (to a point) with dive bezels. That argument is invalid with a perfectly good watch that would run if maintenance was performed.

    All IMHO, and if anyone reading this prescribes to the fashion statement only mindset, more power to you. I just don't get it...
     
  18. mrsleeve

    mrsleeve Loaded Pockets

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    Yes I dont go anywhere with out a watch on. Only time I dont wear one is in the shower. Hot water and shampoo dont play nice with the gaskets in most watches
     
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  19. raggasonic

    raggasonic Loaded Pockets

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    I' m on the same boat. I can't imagine spending more than 30 minutes without a watch
     
  20. sungame

    sungame Loaded Pockets

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    I wouldn't say it is necessary, exactly, but it makes things a lot easier.

    Like many others have stated already, it is quicker and easier to glance at my wrist than to pull out my phone and push a button. Also, unless I'm wearing cargos or a jacket, I do not usually carry my phone on person.

    In addition to this, I am (just) old enough to have learned how to read an analogue watch (with hands and stuff) years before I even saw a digital one. Still, I find it much quicker to see approximately what time it is when looking at an analogue watch face.